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Low Sulfur Diet has worked wonders


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#21 lizegg

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 03:30 PM

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I have started on a low sulfur diet and as a result stopped taking the digestve enzyme i was on as it had some bad ingredients but have seen on the peppermint oil capsules i was taking that they contain sulphites. do you think this means peppermint tea has it too? i thought it was good for wind. I'm wondering if my main problem is volume rather than it always being a terrible smell, as i can't normally smell it (i have a bad sense of smell though). The list i'm using seems to say that soy sauce (I'm not sure if soybean oil is just American for soy sauce (Im in the UK) is OK for a low sulfur diet so i'm still using it - does anyone know if it should be avoided? all different lists seem to say different things! I'm half chinese so am sort of expecting that if it's a particular intolerance to something that it's more likely to be milk-based stuff, alcohol etc. unlike a lot of people on this forum (i think) I'm more D than C but still with the wind!


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#22 Kathleen M.

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 04:14 PM

Sulfur is mostly about odor rather than volume.For volume you might need to limit starches (rice is usually the least gassy but you may still want to keep from having a lot all at once) because a lot of the gas volume comes from the starch no human digest but will feed the bacteria in the colon quite nicely.
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#23 lizegg

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 08:44 AM

thanks kathleen. am starting to have more quinoa instead

#24 lizegg

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 08:08 AM

i saw somewhere on this forum that soluble fibre produces gas but insoluble fibre doesn't. it seems to say all over the internet that soluble fibre is better than insoluble for ibs sufferers. does anyone think it's true that soluble fibre produces gas but insoluble doesn't? I had thought of decreasing insoluble and replacing with soluble but don't want to if it makes it worse! I am taking pepto bismol and charcoal tablets which seem to be doing something at least!thanks for any help/ advice

#25 BQ

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 09:13 AM

Here is some info on Gas which will clear things up for you I think.http://digestive.nid...eases/pubs/gas/
Please remember this is a group of folks seeking support on how to live with and manage IBS. THESE ARE ONLY MY OWN THOUGHTS. IF YOU WANT AN EXPERT OPINION, ASK A MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL.

#26 Kathleen M.

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 10:59 AM

It isn't true that soluble vs insoluble equals fermentable vs non-fermentable. Citrucel is a soluble fiber but not fermentable.A lot of the soluble fibers do have a high fermentation rate so tend to be gassy. However not every IBSers is extremely sensitive to gas volume. So I may be fine with one fiber that bothers someone else. Some people can't tolerate any fiber of any kind in any amount. I was like that when my pain levels were very high. All these A is better than B or C is bad for IBSers is to the last statement ON AVERAGE. No one is statistically average in all ways. So take every single statement with a grain of salt. However, they can help guide you to what is more likely to work than not work, but it still takes trial and error to see what works for you.I also think a lot of the site L says M and site R says S is a lot depends on who is writing the information and whether they go by hard data, or what worked for them. Even hard data is all about the AVERAGE person and generally doesn't talk about the 5% that were this other way or the 33% that were another completely different way.
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#27 lizegg

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 03:45 AM

thanks a lot BQ and kathleen.

#28 Common Response

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 03:59 AM

i saw somewhere on this forum that soluble fibre produces gas but insoluble fibre doesn't. it seems to say all over the internet that soluble fibre is better than insoluble for ibs sufferers. does anyone think it's true that soluble fibre produces gas but insoluble doesn't? I had thought of decreasing insoluble and replacing with soluble but don't want to if it makes it worse!

Hi Liz.I was speaking to my dietitian on this very subject.Traditional soluble fibre such as Psyllium produces gas.My dietitian now prescribes Normafibe as a daily soluble fibre supplement.Normafibe contains stercula granules (620miligram/gram) which won't produce flatulence or wind.The Gastroenterology Dept of my Public Hospital prescribes Stercula based soluble fibre due to its properties.http://www.getprice....2--43695037.htm





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