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Printable FODMAP Diet Chart for your Convenience


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#1 Common Response

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 12:42 AM

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Hi Everyone.I networked with my son and together we came up with a single page printable FODMAP diet chart.It's colorful and easy to follow.Feel free to copy and or distribute it.If it's use helps anyone reduce their suffering then I'm more than greatful.We've needed to update the chart (15 Jul 2011).Artichokes & Pistachio nuts both contain Fructans and therefore unsuitable.

Attached Files


Edited by Jeffrey Roberts, 15 September 2013 - 10:00 AM.
Chart updated to list eggplant as low fodmap

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#2 tourist

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 06:03 AM

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Thank you, I look forward to seeing the attachment. The FODMAP concept has saved me from daily pain and discomfort but I have been a little frustrated by the variations in the available lists. Some say tomatoes and collards are safe, others say don't go near them, and so forth, leaving me to wonder if I have to develop my own list from trial and error. For the past 5-6 weeks I have been living on a diet of those foods that leave me unscathed and adding one at a time, and that's working well. I am so unused to being free from gas and distension its still a daily celebration. But I sure would like to see a few FODMAP food lists that have a core of agreement. I am also very lactose intolerant.Here's an interesting bit that may be related: the muscle cramps that have limited my ability to exercise are gone. I have been athletic all my life, competing in a number of sports and when these IBS issues became serious, about seven years ago, I was also plagued with muscle cramps that not only woke me in the middle of the night, but would also seize up and not allow me to do abdominal crunches or anything that flexed the calves or arches. The muscle cramps disappeared suddenly when I began to eliminate FODMAPS. I think the osmosis of fluids to the gut had been disrupting the fluids and electrolytes in the muscles.

#3 Common Response

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 08:00 AM

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Thank you, I look forward to seeing the attachment. The FODMAP concept has saved me from daily pain and discomfort For the past 5-6 weeks I have been living on a diet of those foods that leave me unscathed and adding one at a time, and that's working well. I am so unused to being free from gas and distension its still a daily celebration. But I sure would like to see a few FODMAP food lists that have a core of agreement. I am also very lactose intolerant.Here's an interesting bit that may be related: the muscle cramps that have limited my ability to exercise are gone. I have been athletic all my life, competing in a number of sports and when these IBS issues became serious, about seven years ago, I was also plagued with muscle cramps that not only woke me in the middle of the night, but would also seize up and not allow me to do abdominal crunches or anything that flexed the calves or arches. The muscle cramps disappeared suddenly when I began to eliminate FODMAPS. I think the osmosis of fluids to the gut had been disrupting the fluids and electrolytes in the muscles.

Excellent result T.For years sufferers have tried many treatments without result.Distrusting of cures, to many, the FODMAP diet might appear as just another fad solution.Quite a few might find that sticking to this diet will pleasantly surprise them.I'm not sure about Collards, but Endive, Spinach & Silver Beat are all FODMAP free.Eating them with a stable gut should present no problems.An unstable gut, overloaded with FODMAP, is already compromised and is easily overwhelmed with any food one might consume. Tomatoes are acceptable however the seeds, which are very acid, can affect some.When preparing a tomato sauce, I like to sieve out the seeds.

but I have been a little frustrated by the variations in the available lists. Some say tomatoes and collards are safe, others say don't go near them, and so forth, leaving me to wonder if I have to develop my own list from trial and error.

You'll find that early FODMAP lists were limited by the resource of those assigned to analyze foods.With time further research has allowed more to be categorized and to correct errors.Unfortunately many haven't kept their lists up to date.The attached chart has had a dozen recent changes and reflects foods listed by a large Public Hospital in my area.

#4 Jeffrey Roberts

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 10:29 AM

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Thanks so much for sharing your diet chart. Sorry for the technical glitch. Please try again to open the attachment. Members should now have this permission.Jeff

#5 mikeyb

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 07:18 AM

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Thanks Kathleen and Jeff for sorting out the attachment. Can now be downloaded.Many thanks to Common Response for the chart. It will be interesting to see how this diet pans out for myself and others.

#6 Common Response

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 01:08 AM

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winter sqaush not on there i that safe and is all fresh fish safe

Hi S.Where I hail from we don't really use the term squash so I'm not totally familiar with it.If my search is correct squash and pumpkin are the same thing.Pumpkin is safe, so I believe Squash is as well.All fresh meat & fish is FODMAP free.Avoid any meat/fish which is commercially minced/cured/smoked/preserved or otherwise tampered with unless you're certain of the additives involved.

#7 faze action

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 06:33 AM

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Awesome! Great job, Common... I have one question (if you know): why are red bell peppers and not green okay? Are orange, yellow peppers okay as well?

#8 breakaway

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 02:42 PM

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I networked with my son and together we came up with a single page printable FODMAP diet chart.It's colorful and easy to follow.

Hi thanks for making such a professionally designed layout. I noticed that you put soy as something that is allowed although I have seen it on the dis-allowed list.Also what do you mean exactly under the sub-heading, "large total fructose dose"?Thanks

#9 Common Response

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 06:46 AM

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Awesome! Great job, Common... I have one question (if you know): why are red bell peppers and not green okay? Are orange, yellow peppers okay as well?

Hi F.Red bell peppers (capsicum) are ripened green bell peppers (capsicum).Green bell peppers have been found to contain substantial levels of polyols (FODMAP).Apparently the ripening process removes the polyols.I don't have any knowledge of the polyol content of yellow and orange capsicums, but they sound like ripening stages towards red.That would make their polyol content reduced.Hope this helps.

#10 Common Response

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 07:12 AM

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Hi thanks for making such a professionally designed layout. I noticed that you put soy as something that is allowed although I have seen it on the dis-allowed list.Also what do you mean exactly under the sub-heading, "large total fructose dose"?Thanks

Hi B.Fructose is generally a problem when:1. Food contains more fructose than glucose. e.g. Kiwi fruit contains 4 units of fructose and 4 units of glucose per 100gram (balanced) Honey contains 40 units of fructose and 30 units of glucose per 100gram (problem)2. Too much fructose is eaten at once (high fructose load = 2-3 pieces of even suitable fruit at one sitting).The Low FODMAP diet acknowledges that we couldn't survive without some FODMAP to allow a balanced diet.Most of us can tolerate some level of FODMAP but we should avoid a fructose overload.Soy Beans contain raffinose which is a poorly absorbed windy food molecule.Although Soy Beans contain galactans and should be avoided, for most, Soy Milk, Tofu (Bean Curd) & Soy Sauce is tolerated.Having said that, you should experiment once your symptoms have subsided.I should amend the chart to include Soy Beans as a Galactan FODMAP and to be avoided.Similarly Sweet Corn should be avoided, but products made with Corn Flour are acceptable.

#11 Common Response

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 07:24 AM

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on the list it says summer squash i can only get winter in ukdo you think carrots would be better than winter squash for me i did used to eat carrots somethimes cave me consaption and bloating but when i think both do whats lowest in fructose

My dietitians Low FODMAP diet guide lists all squash as suitable.Perhaps I should remove "summer" from the chart!You might also try Zucchini.Most FODMAP vegetables, with the exception of Sugar Snap Peas, contain Fructans and Polyols, not Fructose.Fructans and Polyols are FODMAPS & unsuitable.If you had problems with carrots perhaps this was due to your overall diet.Diet on low FODMAP for awhile until your gut settles and then retry carrots.

#12 faze action

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 12:27 PM

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Hi F.Red bell peppers (capsicum) are ripened green bell peppers (capsicum).Green bell peppers have been found to contain substantial levels of polyols (FODMAP).Apparently the ripening process removes the polyols.I don't have any knowledge of the polyol content of yellow and orange capsicums, but they sound like ripening stages towards red.That would make their polyol content reduced.Hope this helps.

That does help. Thanks. Now I have to toss the green pepper in my fridge... :(

#13 Common Response

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 12:03 AM

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Full ingredients Maltodextrin, Prebiotic Fructooligosaccharides (FOS 0.3g), Probiotic culture (Lactococcus lactis Rosell-1058, Lactobacillus casei Rosell-215, Lactobacillus acidophilus Rosell-52 and Bifidobacterium bifidum Rosell-71). does thi look safe its a probiotic

Maltodextrin is a Fructan and unsuitable on a low FODMAP diet.Ingredients appearing on product labels are usually listed in order from highest to lowest percentage content.As Maltodextrin appears first it would suggest a high percentage of content.When choosing a Probiotic also ask your Pharmacist to help you choose one which is Lactose free.

#14 Common Response

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 12:12 AM

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i feel fed up with all this one min ok next not i will try carrots againcan i find zucchini in uk food stores

Perhaps you misunderstood S.To clarify, carrots don't contain FODMAP.If you suffer from fructose/lactose malabsorption/intolerance then carrots are a suitable vegetable.There are two reasons why you might continue to have problems with carrots.
  • You might have another unrelated gastro intestinal problem making you sensitive to carrots.or
  • Your digestive system is currently overloaded with FODMAPS causing you to have problems with any food you eat.
If your issue is the second reason, then by strictly follow the low FODMAP diet your system should become more robust and be able to handle the carrots. Time will tell.Regarding zucchinis, why don't you visit your local greengrocer?

#15 -Nikki

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 10:19 AM

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In the UK zucchinis are called courgettes.

#16 Common Response

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 01:31 AM

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god i hate ibs just had tea cod fish lettuce and turnip zucchini and turnip feel sick bloated belly making so much noisehad papaya fruit to before food was that a OK teai was having peppermint caps found they helped some time and made me worse other days any one else find that

Hang in there S.In terms of the meal you described.Make sure you don't have large portions of fruit per sitting.Avoid smoked cod as this could be an irritant.Add a carbohydrate to complete the balance, such as steamed rice.To properly evaluate this diet you should try it for atleast a month.If your condition has developed over a long period of time, it's possible that your intestines have been colonized with undesirable bacteria.Having lived on continuous supply of undigested food (FODMAP), undesirable bacteria still present might continue to produce gas and an unstable environment. These need to be starved out and could take time to die back once you remove foods which they have been living on.During my early period on the FODMAP diet I was able to obtain relief by using Huang Lian.It's a Chinese herb which is very delicate to the stomach and removed my tendency to diarrhea and gas.It stimulates the heart, large intestine, liver, and stomach channels.Use for damp heat and toxic heat disorders, especially those affecting the gastrointestinal system.It's inexpensive and taking it for a month might help you to turn your condition around in conjunction with the diet.http://www.orientalpharmacy.com/hulisutak.htmlUsually sold at Asian Herbalists or Asian General Stores.

#17 murphe6

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 06:16 PM

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on the list it says summer squash i can only get winter in ukdo you think carrots would be better than winter squash for me i did used to eat carrots somethimes cave me consaption and bloating but when i think both do whats lowest in fructouse

Hi Scarlett,I am new to this group and just having a look at some recent posts. I am trying to narrow down my IBS problem and have done some research today; I don't know if this is helpful, but I read somewhere that some cooked vegetables such as carrots contain more fructose than raw ones. Some good info at this site: http://www.healthhyp...absorption.html Hope this helps!

#18 breakaway

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 09:28 PM

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Hi Common Response,Thanks for replying. Do you know why it is okay to eat moderate amounts of fructose if it is "balanced" by glucose? (I'm trying to logically figure out how the digestive problems are arising)Also, do you have any thoughts on peanut butter?

#19 Common Response

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 03:02 AM

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Hi Common Response,Thanks for replying. Do you know why it is okay to eat moderate amounts of fructose if it is "balanced" by glucose? (I'm trying to logically figure out how the digestive problems are arising)Also, do you have any thoughts on peanut butter?

I don't know technically how it works but have relied on the research performed by Dr Sue Shepherd.All fruit contains fructose.Research revealed that as long as the fructose/glucose content of fruit is balanced and in moderate amounts, the digestive system is able to cope.Acceptable fruits such as kiwi fruit contain equal quantities of fructose & glucose.That's also why sucrose (table sugar) is acceptable.It's a double sugar molecule containing one fructose & one glucose molecule and therefore in balance.Peanut Butter and peanuts aren't recommended.Peanuts are just one of those foods which are windy & difficult to digest for most.

#20 Kathleen M.

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 07:22 AM

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The balanced with glucose has to do with how the fructose receptors work. People with fructose intolerance do absorb some fructose.The fructose receptor works best when there is at least as many glucose molecules around as fructose. I believe when they are most effective they grab both a glucose and a fructose molecule (from what I remember when I looked this up before). So they work less well when you have an excess of fructose around.You also usually only have so many receptors so you don't want there to be more fructose around than you have receptors for them. So that is why small to moderate amounts may be tolerated where large amounts are not.So basically there is some amount of fructose that you can absorb per meal when there is enough glucose around to make sure you can get each fructose across. Fructose you do not absorb and gets into the colon is what causes the symptoms, so what you absorb and use as fuel in the rest of the body is not a problem. You just don't want to put more in than you can use.
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