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Printable FODMAP Diet Chart for your Convenience


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#81 Common Response

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 06:44 AM

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Initial advise was to do what you described but this was later retracted as it was found that the juice of the onion was as bad as the flesh and caused symptoms just as severe.Avoid all parts of an onion at any cost.Also watch for hidden onion.Many processed foods contain onion powder.Also rotisserie chicken is often rubbed with onion salt before it's roasted.Also beware of "secret herbs and spices".I'd say your reaction was triggered by the onion juice and earlier by possible inulin in the rice milk.I actually wrote to Vitasoy to bring to their attention the contradiction of adding inulin to their products.I indicated that most consumers choose rice/oat milk because of food intolerance issues.Adding inulin,high FODMAP, replaces one irritant with another.It's quite possible the brand you tried contained inulin as many producers add hidden ingredients.Also, your digestive system is over populated with bacteria you've been feeding on undigested FODMAP anbd is continuing to cause symptoms.This bacterial population established itself over many years and will not have been affected after only a week of food elimination.It can be a slow process with gradual improvement over weeks or months.In the mean time your gut will be quite unstable as it begins the path of recreating its flora.My wife celebrated her birthday the other night.I thought, why not and had two pieces of cake and two chocolates and boy I new it the next day.The symptoms were quite dramatic and reinforced my need to stay faithful to the diet.It's good to watch your daily reactions to fine tune your diet but it's also important to look for the bigger picture over time.

While doing some research on the FODMAP diet I came across some information about onions on one of the FODMAP sites. It says that although one cannot have onions on this diet, one can chop the onions large enough to remove them after cooking so that one gets the flavour and doesn't actually eat the onion.I did this in a beef stew and was awake most of last night with horrible gas.Can the gas be caused by the onion juice? I'm assuming that was the problem.Has anyone else who is trying this diet felt worse in the first week? Could it be that my body is having a detox and suffering from withdrawal from my normal diet?




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#82 Becky0000

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 05:45 AM

Just to let you know that after a week on the FODMAP diet I'm happy to report I've just had 2 PAIN FREE days!!! What relief. I'm thrilled!At first I thought it was a rather restrictive diet to follow, but it's well worth it to feel normal again. I've made up some more interesting menus/recipes and I definitely intend to continue with this eating plan.I'm amazed at how well I feel now the pain's gone!Thanks for posting the diet on here. I hope more sufferers follow your advice.Becky

#83 Common Response

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 06:09 AM

Hi Becky.Great news in terms of your confidence moving forward.When you have time to explore there is a whole new world of food out there waiting to be discovered.There is much to learn from Asian countries where wheat and dairy were largely unknown.In fact a large percentage of Asians are lactose intolerant.Tonight I served a wonderful dessert of Red Bean rice balls in coconut cream.They pound the cooked rice into a resin and use this to coat red bean paste into one inch balls.These are then boiled until they float to the top of the water.They're then drained and served in bowls with coconut cream.A low FODMAP sweet with very little sugar and a treat.This followed my stir fry chicken with ginger, celery, red capsicum, carrot, zucchini, bok choy, & cashews, served on a bed of steamed Thai jasmine rice.All low FODMAP as well.Followed by a cup of finest Chinese Jasmine tea.Earlier in the day, my breakfast consisted of a bowl of Uncle Tobys oats topped with blueberries.All low FODMAP and a great start to the day.

Just to let you know that after a week on the FODMAP diet I'm happy to report I've just had 2 PAIN FREE days!!! What relief. I'm thrilled!At first I thought it was a rather restrictive diet to follow, but it's well worth it to feel normal again. I've made up some more interesting menus/recipes and I definitely intend to continue with this eating plan.I'm amazed at how well I feel now the pain's gone!Thanks for posting the diet on here. I hope more sufferers follow your advice.Becky



#84 Chrono

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 05:36 AM

Hi, new user here and I have some questions regarding berries and swedes/rutabaga. From what I understand xylitol is a big no-no on the fodmap diet, but I have seen some sites that claim that certain berries like blueberries contain a high amount of xylitol and thus is unsuitable on the fodmap diet, but yet it is deemed suitable in the fodmap diet chart? Also I thought all vegetables that are a member of the Brassica family like the swede is to be avoided?

#85 Pixna

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 10:41 AM

Thank you so much for this very helpful chart! I am vegan and would like to know if there are other vegans here who are doing well with the low-FODMAPS diet. Any input regarding what's working for you would be appreciated.

#86 Common Response

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 03:13 AM

Hi S.Almond milk is an excellent replacement for milk.The trick is to buy unsweetened almond milk.The problem with processed food is that the manufacturer can slip in extra ingredients without declaring them.Look for the ingredients on the packaging.Sue Shepherds diet guide recommends Pure Harvest Almond Milk.This is what Pure Harvest say about their product:Pure Harvest Organic Almond Milk is a great substitute for people who cannot tolerate dairy or soy milk. It is Cholesterol-free, Lactose-free, gluten-free & does not contain cane sugar.Ingredients - Filtered water, organic almonds, organic rice syrup, organic sunflower oil, sea salt.If you're using an unsweetened almond milk, then perhaps dilute it 50% with water until your system can get used to it.The Rice Bubbles should be OK, but Kellogs do fortify them with vitamins and minerals.You could be getting a reaction to the added chemicals.I personally buy an organic Rice Bubble product which has no additives at all, other than the rice.

Can i ask if almond sugar free milk is fructouse free i am haveing troulble after breakfast when eating rice bubbles and almond milk i no both are fine for ibs but what about fructouse am haven bit bother after tea steamed fish rice carrots any advice



#87 Common Response

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 03:45 AM

Hi, new user here and I have some questions regarding berries and swedes/rutabaga. From what I understand xylitol is a big no-no on the fodmap diet, but I have seen some sites that claim that certain berries like blueberries contain a high amount of xylitol and thus is unsuitable on the fodmap diet, but yet it is deemed suitable in the fodmap diet chart? Also I thought all vegetables that are a member of the Brassica family like the swede is to be avoided?

Hi C.Very interesting questions.My understanding is that although blueberries might have xylitol it's at tolerable levels provided you stick to small portions.Xylitol is more easily tolerated than others such as mannitol & sorbitol.Sue Shepherd adds the comment: "contains some polyol, limit if you are intolerant".The low FODMAP diet is designed around keeping overall FODMAP levels below ones tolerable threshold.If we eliminated FODMAP 100% our diet would be very limited, out of balance, and unhealthy.Having said that you need to see how your body tolerates blueberries.You might find it's OK, or you might find you have a reaction and need to reduce the portion.There are a number of vegetables in the Brassica family which should be avoided.Two which fall outside this recommendation are mustard seed and rapeseed which are OK.Swedes and turnips, in the Brassica family, feature in Sue Shepherds allowed vegetables list, but I'll make inquiries and get back to you.

#88 Pixna

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 07:30 AM

I'm a little confused about certain foods that are listed on this chart that are listed differently on others: avocado, chives, eggplant, green beans, nuts and seeds, peas, pineapple, and zucchini. Are these foods low or high in FODMAPS (safe or not safe)? Various sources seem to differ on these, so it's very confusing. Also, how can we find out when new foods have been tested?One more question (for now :)): What is the reason some of these listings conflict with each other on certain foods? Isn't there a "definitive" way to determine a food's levels of certain components?

#89 Common Response

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 01:50 AM

were do you buy your white rice bubbles organic from please can you recomed a brand please

I've been buying "Abundant Earth" Puffed Rice from the health food section at Safeway/Woolworths in Australia.Made from 100% whole grain brown rice.http://www.abundantearth.com.au/cereal_products.htmlCheck out the shelves at your supermarket for something similar.

#90 Common Response

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 01:53 AM

I thought all vegetables that are a member of the Brassica family like the swede is to be avoided?

I contacted my dietitian who is closely associated with the initial research performed which led to the establishment of the FODMAP diet.This is what she indicated:Turnips and Swedes have been independently tested for FODMAPís,and are allowed on a low FODMAP diet.Eat them with confidence. :)

#91 Common Response

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 02:16 AM

Hi P.Green beans, zucchini, nuts (except pistachio), pineapple, green beans are all safe.Eggplant (polyol), sweet peas (fructan), and avocado (polyol) should be avoided.Having said that the following should be noted.
  • Nuts are a concentrated food and should be eaten in moderation, particularly peanuts which a difficult for many to digest.
  • Allowable fruit (including pineapple) should be restricted to two portions per day, eaten at different times.
  • Individuals should assess what a suitable portion size is for their unique tolerance experience.
  • Most experienced an increase in tolerance after dieting on low FODMAP for awhile.
  • Chives are meant to be safe, but being similar to the onion family, l personally won't eat them.
There is conflicting information out there in the net.Partly due to outdated information.In March a small number of foods were added to the unsafe list after further testing found them unsuitable.My chart on post number 1, is current and is sourced from those close to the original researcher, Dr Sue Shepherd, who pioneered FODMAPs.I keep in regular contact with my dietitian and have updated my diet chart twice since first posting.Hope this helps. :)

I'm a little confused about certain foods that are listed on this chart that are listed differently on others: avocado, chives, eggplant, green beans, nuts and seeds, peas, pineapple, and zucchini. Are these foods low or high in FODMAPS (safe or not safe)? Various sources seem to differ on these, so it's very confusing. Also, how can we find out when new foods have been tested?One more question (for now :)): What is the reason some of these listings conflict with each other on certain foods? Isn't there a "definitive" way to determine a food's levels of certain components?



#92 Pixna

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 07:58 AM

Thanks so much, Common Response! I greatly appreciate your reply and the information.Do you know, on average, how long it takes for most people with IBS to see major improvements on a low-FODMAPS diet? I realize that everyone is unique. At the same time, I'm wondering if overall improvement in general takes weeks or months on average, and also whether most people stick to the diet for the long-term (not just for eight weeks). Thank you!

#93 Kathleen M.

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 08:49 AM

Since most of what FODMAPS do to you is increase gas volume, it tends to be a diet that works fairly quickly (on the order of days, not months or years).Usually how long people stick with specialized diets tends to be how well it controls symptoms and how annoying the symptoms are when they fall off the wagon. Some people can stick to a diet for years if it controls symptoms enough they become much more functional in their life.If you are limiting foods for the long run try to make sure the foods you can eat give you as balanced a diet as possible.
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#94 Pixna

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 01:00 PM

Since most of what FODMAPS do to you is increase gas volume, it tends to be a diet that works fairly quickly (on the order of days, not months or years).Usually how long people stick with specialized diets tends to be how well it controls symptoms and how annoying the symptoms are when they fall off the wagon. Some people can stick to a diet for years if it controls symptoms enough they become much more functional in their life.If you are limiting foods for the long run try to make sure the foods you can eat give you as balanced a diet as possible.

Thank you, Kathleen. I've only been following the low-FODMAPS diet for a few days now. I did see almost immediate improvement in a few symptoms, but I think I have SIBO in addition to IBS, so I'm guessing this is going to be a long-term thing. I asked about the time issues because I read that one book states you should be on the low-FODMAPS diet for about eight weeks before doing any food challenges, and I was wondering if that's how long it takes for changes in the gut to take hold. I think my diet is pretty balanced, so that's not a major concern for me. Feeling better and getting rid of my symptoms is what is paramount to me.

#95 Chrono

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 02:26 PM

I contacted my dietitian who is closely associated with the initial research performed which led to the establishment of the FODMAP diet.This is what she indicated:Turnips and Swedes have been independently tested for FODMAPís,and are allowed on a low FODMAP diet.Eat them with confidence. :)

Thank you, that is great news :)

#96 Kathleen M.

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:43 PM

If the diet seems to be working it does make sense to stay on it at least for awhile to see what the normal ups and downs are before testing potentially problematic foods.That way you have a good feel for what the range of good days and bad days are on the diet. So if you add something that just happens to be on a bad day you don't automatically blame that food if you know that is your "new normal".
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#97 Pixna

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:46 PM

That makes sense, Kathleen. Thanks! :)

#98 Common Response

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 01:11 AM

Thank you, Kathleen. I've only been following the low-FODMAPS diet for a few days now. I did see almost immediate improvement in a few symptoms, but I think I have SIBO in addition to IBS, so I'm guessing this is going to be a long-term thing. I asked about the time issues because I read that one book states you should be on the low-FODMAPS diet for about eight weeks before doing any food challenges, and I was wondering if that's how long it takes for changes in the gut to take hold. I think my diet is pretty balanced, so that's not a major concern for me. Feeling better and getting rid of my symptoms is what is paramount to me.

Hi P.I agree with Kathleen.I just came home after a long day at work and was thinking, "It feels great not to be walking around with a gut full of undigested food".As Kathleen indicated, withdrawing FODMAP from your diet should have positive effects soon after, but the SIBO which has been feeding off this material will continue to have a affect for some time.Eliminating FODMAP isn't a cure but a way to manage your condition, so until there is a cure it is something you must continue to do.Eight weeks is probably mentioned to give your gut a chance to stabilize before you begin to challenge your system with specific foods for which there is no intolerance test.I found my gut took atleast three months to stabilize and that was after also taking Huang Lian (Coptis rhizoma) which help dry out diarrhea l was having.I've suffered with undiagnosed malabsorption/intolerance of fructose and lactose for decades. My theory is that the bacteria which would have colonized your large intestine will take time to die off.In the mean time it will continue cause symptoms.If you suffer from anxiety and/or are not mindful when you eat, even after eliminating FODMAP, if you gulp your food without chewing properly undigested food can still arrive into the large intestines and continue to feed the bacteria.Also, as careful as you are, you might unintentionally continue to eat FODMAP until you come to terms with what you can and can't eat and in what quantity, which will have an impact.I recommend that you become very familiar with the FODMAP food chart and learn which processed foods should be avoided.Learn suitable recipes and plan ahead so you have plenty of low FODMAP food on hand so you can continue to eat a well balanced diet whilst avoiding the trap of eating unsuitably.Try to be strict and combine your diet with exercise, relaxation, mindful eating, and avoid alcohol, particularly beer, wine and dark spirits, and drink plenty of water.Keep networking to fine tune the diet and to build on your knowledge.When FODMAP free, most of your ingested food will be digested and absorbed in the stomach, duodenum and small intestines, leaving a sweet balanced waste entering the large intestine.As their food source drops off, the bacteria in the large intestines will die back to healthier levels and lead to reduced symptoms, regular satisfying elimination, and increased feeling of wellbeing.I also recommend embracing the diet with full confidence as it has been scientifically validated.A majority of those who suffer from lactose and/or fructose malabsorption/intolerance, and most likely fructans, polyols, and galacto-oligosaccharides), and who don't have secondary issues contributing to their problem, should see significant improvement if not elimination of symptoms by eliminating FODMAP from their diet.The greater the time on low FODMAP the more robust your system will become.

#99 Pixna

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 08:03 AM

Common Response, your reply is so helpful and supportive -- thank you!!! Fortunately, I am extremely mindful when I eat, never have alcohol (the one time I had a few sips of wine several months ago I nearly keeled over died from the pain afterward), exercise regularly, drink plenty of water, and have virtually memorized the FODMAP chart. I totally agree that it is incredible to feel so much better so quickly -- amazing! That does confirm to me that this is most certainly the right path for me to follow. However, I still have some "issues," and what you said about the bacteria feeding off the undigested material for a while makes perfect sense. I am also thrilled that there is scientific validation for it -- that does give me a lot of confidence. It is comforting to know that it took three months for your gut to stabilize -- thank you for sharing that with me. While I'm not expecting instant miracles, the initial changes have me very optimistic and excited for the long term. I definitely don't want to backslide or "cheat" in any way, so I do plan to be prepared and always have something safe to eat on hand.Will you be updating the chart regularly as new information becomes available?Also, do you know if the following are considered safe?* Seeds (such as pumpkin, sunflower, and sesame)* Seed butters (such as tahini)* Culinary seeds (such as cumin and mustard) and spices (such as cinnamon and allspice)* Vinegar (balsamic, apple cider, rice, etc.)* Nutritional yeast (Engevita yeast -- it might be called something else in Australia)* Radishes* Kale and collard greensMany, many thanks! I finally see a light at the end of the tunnel I've been in almost my whole life, so I have every intention of being diligent and strict. I'm so grateful for your support and help!

#100 texasturbocat

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 04:07 PM

Thank you for the chart Common Response. I am going to ask my GI Doc to give me the breath test. But as I've already been diagnosed with IBS I feel the diet will be good for me regardless of results. I have problems with many foods, including some on the allowed list. I am not sure if some of the veggies I eat hurt me just because my gut is irritated. I can't seem to tolerate strawberries, pineapple, potatoes, or citrus fruit- it gives me D. As for mushrooms, olives, bell peppers, basically anything that has seeds, skin or a hull hurts when it comes out. I am hoping that once the bad bacteria is reduced and my gut calms down I may be able to re-introduce some of these foods?Also, I was wondering what if any supplements you take, to make sure you are getting enough necessary vitamins and minerals. I was looking at JuicePlus but after reading up on this thread wonder if it would contain FODMAPs. Any thoughts?Thank you so much for your suggestions. You seem to be a kind person and we all appreciate the time you take to answer our questions. :)Jen =^.^=





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