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Has anyone tried Lactoferrin against SIBO biofilms?


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#1 Freud

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 12:33 PM

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I heard Lactoferrin would be effective against SIBO biofilms. Anyone tried it? :)


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#2 lowimpact

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 12:49 PM

I heard Lactoferrin would be effective against SIBO biofilms. Anyone tried it? :)

What makes you think SIBO has biofilms? I thought only lyme, candida, or parasites created those. If SIBO had bio films it doesn't make sense how certain things like vionnex would work because it would have to starve them out in 14 days which I thought you couldn't do to a biofilm...

#3 Freud

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 01:47 PM

What makes you think SIBO has biofilms? I thought only lyme, candida, or parasites created those. If SIBO had bio films it doesn't make sense how certain things like vionnex would work because it would have to starve them out in 14 days which I thought you couldn't do to a biofilm...

And how many have reached an actual cure? All hours I've spent reading about SIBO I've only come across one person who claims to be cured. However, the biofilm theory is only a theory. It could be an explanation why the bacterias return after a round of antibiotics. They "hide" in the biofilm. Can't all bacteria create biofilm? I'm no expert so I'm glad to be corrected if wrong. :) Here you can read about bacteria, biofilm and lactoferrin.

#4 Kathleen M.

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 01:56 PM

Normal human colon bacteria make biofilmshttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2000251/SIBO is typically the same species as normal human colon bacteria.I think more of the problem with SIBO is whatever the motility issue (or whatever causes the small intestine to not clear itself out properly) that allowed the bacteria to get going in there the first time are still there even after the bacteria go away.So they come back the same way they got going the first time.
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#5 Freud

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 02:03 PM

Normal human colon bacteria make biofilmshttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2000251/SIBO is typically the same species as normal human colon bacteria.I think more of the problem with SIBO is whatever the motility issue (or whatever causes the small intestine to not clear itself out properly) that allowed the bacteria to get going in there the first time are still there even after the bacteria go away.So they come back the same way they got going the first time.

I also think this could be one thing, but, there's often a temporary problem that causes the overgrowth, like a stomach flu or food poisoning, and in my case, a pregnancy. My theory is when the bacteria has had the chance to overgrow you're stuck in a vicous cycle. They hinder a proper cleansing wave, which hinder you from getting healthy and then your body get accustomed to the new conditions and also damaged and then you get new problems etc etc. You get the point. But this is also ONLY a theory of course :)

#6 Kathleen M.

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 02:19 PM

Well the inflammation from stomach flu does seem to be able to damage the enteric nerves which can lead to longer lasting issues like IBS even without SIBO.There could be some host/bacteria interactions, but I think there are plenty of things that can cause IBS damage that are not quite as temporary as people think. The original things may clear out quickly, but sometimes there is "friendly fire" damage that can take longer to heal, and the nervous system is one of those things that takes a long time to heal when it takes a hit.So I wouldn't assume that the SIBO all by itself perpetuates the problem, but as I said there could be host/bacteria interactions that may be part of the problem. I just don't know if they can do it all by itself.
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