Advertisement

Jump to content


Did you lose your job due to IBS?


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Maria Verdi_*

Guest_Maria Verdi_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 June 2000 - 10:48 PM

Advertisement
My flare up the past few week has caused me to miss several days. I won't be able to work if I have flare ups like this again. This has been the worse in the past eight years! Anyone lose a job?


Advertisement

#2 moms777

moms777

    Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 467 posts

Posted 01 June 2000 - 10:56 PM

Hi Maria,I chose to leave my part-time job because the stress was too much for me. Not the stress of the job, mind you, but the stress of my worrying about not making it to the bathroom in time. It got to the point that I wouldn't eat all day. Then, if I got home too late, I wouldn't eat until the next night! It was RIDICULOUS! I'm sorry I had to leave it though. I miss it

#3 linr

linr

    Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 693 posts

Posted 01 June 2000 - 11:02 PM

One of my major frustrations is the fear of working outside the home. I really should get a job but I can't deal with the embarassment of having to go home or run to the bathroom all the time or not even being able to get to work because of IBS. I have had jobs before where I have had some close calls or where the bathrooms are really small. Plus I just wouldn't be able to eat all day because I never know when it will hit.This really is a major problem and I am always racking my brain trying to figure out something I can do from home.I welcome any brilliant ideas.

#4 Guest_SouthernBunny_*

Guest_SouthernBunny_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 June 2000 - 11:05 PM

Maria,I started a leave of absence last week. For the past 3 months I have had cycles of painful and insistent D. It threw me into a situation of constant high anxiety and depression.I waited too long to do something about my situation and the road back for me will be harder because of it. Don't try to ignore it and go on as if nothing is happening (hard to do with IBS anyway). Your body has many ways of saying enough is enough.Start now by being good to yourself. As for me, I'm just learning how.SouthernBunny

#5 Guest_angelkitten_*

Guest_angelkitten_*
  • Guests

Posted 02 June 2000 - 03:08 AM

Maria,I quit a job 3 years ago due to stress, I was having ibs symptoms at the time but did not know I had it. The job was too stressful, and in that situation, I think it was a big part of the ibs. The supervisors there were rotten, i would have an attack and severe stomach pain, and asked to go home, well all they told me was "go drink a can of 7-up and you'll feel better." So i quit. Now in a few weeks I am applying for a part time job so I will wait and see how that works out....hopefully they will understand this time. I am scared, but I also would like to get out of the house a few days a week!

#6 Rhetana

Rhetana

    Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 409 posts

Posted 03 June 2000 - 05:38 PM

Hi - I am fortunate enough to have a mild to moderate case of IBS. That being said, however, I have already used up most of my sick days at work this year, and at one point my boss asked me it there were problems (he was hinting to drugs or alcohol) that he should know about. I think he was starting to get worried and/or upset about the amount of time I was taking off. But I gave him Molly's brochure and then offered to talk about it with him and he was very understanding after that. On the plus side, that removed a lot of stress I was feeling about missing those days, and made my boss just that much more flexible about my sickness. So I didn't have to leave work, even though I came close. I hope it never comes to that.------------------RhetanaIBS D for 10 years (and counting, unfortunately)

#7 Guest_FraidyCat_*

Guest_FraidyCat_*
  • Guests

Posted 03 June 2000 - 10:40 PM

Rhetana, where can I get a copy of Molly's brochure? thanx FC ^--^

#8 Guest_Axelle_*

Guest_Axelle_*
  • Guests

Posted 03 June 2000 - 11:55 PM

Thankfully I have never lost a job due to this IBS problem; however, I have a very difficult time with the demands of my job and the demands of this syndrome. As mentioned here in a previous post, the only way I am able to ensure I do not have a have any serious problems at work is to not eat. If I know I will be in court on a particular day, I don't eat anything (literally-not even water) the whole day before and that day. Interesting enough, though, just this past Wednesday, one of my employees came to me with the unfortunate news she had just been diagnosed with IBS. She has missed a large number of work days as of late with reported stomach problems. I have kept my problems to myself (my work environment is not very conducive to "personal sharing"). She came prepared with pamphlets and a doctor's note referencing her diagnosis. Imagine her surprise when I shared with her my problem. Needless to say, we bonded over our screwed up systems. I would suggest telling you boss your diagnosis and bring along literature if you feel you may not be taken seriously. Also, what has been mentioned in other posts here - have you the ability to keep your job with a change in the schedule allowing you to telecommute (work-at-home) a day or two a week? That opportunity in my job has saved me many, many times - as well as saved my employer money that may have been lost work days if I did not have the ability to telecommute. Just a thought....

#9 Guest_curledlizard_*

Guest_curledlizard_*
  • Guests

Posted 04 June 2000 - 05:14 AM

as long as you are under a doctors care, you qualify for family medical leave act (fmla). this gives you up to 12 weeks excused time from work with no penalties.(dose not hurt your rais periods or other benifits). you can get the paper work from your company hr office. this time can be extended if needed, as long as it is physician approved. the time you use can be intermitent or consecutive. if your job is threatened, you can cover yourself under the americans with disabilities act. although only rare cases are accepted to receive social security benefits,(this is judged case by case), ibs and other colon/rectal diseases are considered a disability under ada. if neccessary call your local ssi office and ask for their information packet.

#10 Rhetana

Rhetana

    Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 409 posts

Posted 04 June 2000 - 07:46 AM

FraidyCat, Molly's brochure is on the home page of this website.

#11 Guest_ocean2200_*

Guest_ocean2200_*
  • Guests

Posted 04 June 2000 - 09:52 AM

This is a very good question. Ibs effects all aspects of our lives. Especially our jobs. Employers/employees should have more compassion for ibs.

#12 Dolphinlady

Dolphinlady

    Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 220 posts

Posted 04 June 2000 - 12:07 PM

FYI, unfortunately, IBS is NOT one of the "maladies" covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act and so far we have no recourse for any disability coverage. This is one of the major hurdles we need to overcome . . . getting IBS recognized as a serious hindrance to daily living.While some of us have been fortunate enough to have understanding bosses, there are still many who have not been as lucky. I think a majority of bosses DON'T understand. It's a shame that we have to consider telling our boss about this condition in order to avoid future problems . . . health issues are really nobody's business. However, if it is enough to have an impact on your job, it's probably a good idea to be straight with the boss up front, armed with written information as many of you have suggested. However, I would leave it at that. Nobody is entitled to know the DETAILS of your specific situation. Furthermore, you do not HAVE to explain ANY of your situation to your employer if you really feel uncomfortable doing so. You cannot be discriminated against and can fight it if you really think the job is worth keeping.Bev
Bev IBS-D/sometimes C/G and nausea, also panic disorder


#13 ziglady

ziglady

    Very Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,336 posts

Posted 04 June 2000 - 05:51 PM

I haven't exactly lost my job due to IBS, but I've reduced it to nearly nothing. Before I got sick, I worked full time, with paid holidays and other benefits. Gradually, IBS problems forced me to work only 20 hours a week. Then I was off on Disability for a year. When I came back, it was for 15 hours a week. In the last year, it's slipped to 4 hours in the office, and another 6 at home. I've been there 15 years now, and I can't believe how tolerant they've been. Of course, I also can't believe how little money I make!

#14 HipJan

HipJan

    Very Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,989 posts

Posted 04 June 2000 - 10:11 PM

I've not been employed for close to 2 years now. I can't imagine working in a full-time job, or even a part-time one, during the past year or two. I had a tough enough time 2-1/2 years ago, when my health started going really weird (no IBS yet though) and when all sorts of yucky things were also going on at the office -- plus a snotty boss later on. Luckily, I don't absolutely have to "work," since I got married and both of us are "older" and not so much in need of money. But, if I were still on my own, I suppose I would have had to take some extended time off, then figure out what I could do to pull in some money without having to be in another yucky corporate job. Good luck to everyone! It can be tough...
"Cast your bread upon the waters..."

#15 Guest_Maria Verdi_*

Guest_Maria Verdi_*
  • Guests

Posted 07 June 2000 - 09:49 PM

Today was the last day of school. I have three months to stay home/or leave work when I want to. I feel calmer.

#16 moulage

moulage

    Very Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,847 posts

Posted 07 June 2000 - 10:59 PM

I didn't have to leave work because of IBS, after 20yrs, but I did have to leave when I got the infection after being on antibiotics over a year, Thankyou very much! :( Now there is no doctor at my clinic that will back me up that this was antibiotic induced colitis. It's okay that they caused it, failed to diagnose it and pretty well ruined what was left of my life since I have fibro too for 10yrs but still was able to hold down a job. They still have theirs, and that's all that matters. They are free and clear! Okay, so I'm playing the victim! I know they didn't purposely do this to me, but they are not helping me any either! I guess you can ignore the Hipocratic Oath when admitting a mistake might cost you and your whole profession something. Politics! Sorry, I do get carried away, don't I? This is not me laughing, it is me gritting my teeth and bearing it!! Afterall, whoever said life was fair? Thanks for letting me vent!!
time will eclipse all reason

#17 Kerlix

Kerlix

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Country:United States

Posted 17 August 2011 - 04:02 PM

I just lost my job due to an erratic work schedule caused by fairly severe IBS-D. I was very open with my employer during my entire career there about it and was able to provide medical documentation to show why I was missing work or showing up late. Even if I showed up late, I would still work 8 hours, staying late. Unfortunately, it was not enough. The VP who fired me even told me that I disclosed more information about my condition than I should have. Which does not really make sense to me. I thought being open about it would keep them informed and help them understand. Apparently not...So yes, I have just lost my job due to IBS.

#18 Diana63

Diana63

    Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 711 posts
  • Country:United Kingdom

Posted 17 August 2011 - 04:19 PM

I had to give up my part time work because my ibs was so severe and i was diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome also.My employers were fortunately very understanding and at the time kept my job open for a year but after that had to get someone to replace me as there was no sign of me being able to get back to work.That was 13years ago and i still cant work!!! :(

#19 overitnow

overitnow

    Very Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6,019 posts
  • Country:Mexico

Posted 17 August 2011 - 11:07 PM

I didn't lose my job so much as give it up because I could no longer function productively and was generally fighting nodding off every afternoon as I drove back to the office. At that time I was fortunate that my wife found a contract at her work that I could do mostly from our home. The only worry I had (and it was a doozy) was that I was organizing a weekend conference at which I would be forced to attend from morning to night, each of the three days. Fortunately, between the time that I left my employment and started the contract, I was introduced to supplementation as a strategy to treat these conditions. I started my vitamin/mineral regimen in March and was no longer falling asleep every afternoon by the end of that month. In July, frightened by a couple of x-rays I received from my chiropractor that showed a couple of short, bright lines that likely were cholesterol buildups, I began taking the flavonoid supplement in the hopes of reducing that threat. 6 weeks later my GERD stopped. The next month my brain fogginess lifted one night while driving home from a meeting. (This is the guy who could barely get through 2 PM 6 months earlier!) One month later I ran the conference. I still had multiple bms and they were still soft; but there was no more D. By the end of 1999, I was back to working two jobs and, more importantly, was able to wait outside of a locked restroom without c***ping in my pants. So, interestingly for me, in attempting to address my general exhaustion and later my cholesterol outside of the doctor's office, I started down a path that has led me to a full, active, and healthy life. People always come up with reasons why this kind of approach will never work for them. I had those same reservations. Fortunately I was completely wrong. Mark
My story of beating IBS and my other chronic conditions: http://www.ibsgroup....total-wellness/

#20 journ3

journ3

    Prolific Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 182 posts
  • Country:United States

Posted 18 August 2011 - 09:26 AM

I realize, which some readers may not, that this is a very old thread from *eleven* years ago that has recently been bumped up, but I need to correct the statement in the quote below my post that IBS is not covered by the ADA. IBS and almost any other disabling condition certainly is covered if you disclose correctly under the law. The ADA does not have a list of specific diagnoses that are covered and/or ones that are not covered. The federal legislators in both political parties who wrote this law, in cooperation with leaders in the disability community, recognized that "disability" can cover many things and even people with the same diagnostic label can have different experiences, needs and preferences for how to accommodate it. The ADA was intentionally crafted to be flexible enough to encourage employers and others to look at every situation and person as individuals, not a one size fits all stereotype. Very few things are specifically excluded, mostly at the insistence of one then-Senator now deceased-- things like kleptomania, sexual deviance, etc. To qualify as a disability, a condition has to fall into one or more of the following definitions: 1) It substantially impairs one or more "major life activities" or 2) There is a record of such an impairment. This definition is intended to cover situations where a person might have recovered from a disabling medical condition(for example, cancer) and is discriminated against because of that history. or 3) A condition is regarded as an impairment when it is not. This definition was intended to cover situations with the person him/herself (for example, disfiguring burns, where somebody might be discriminated against because he/she "looks" disabled.) or by association. At the time the law was written, at the height of the HIV/AIDS crisis, family members without HIV were experiencing discrimination because of their loved ones. Parents of children with disabilities might also be discriminated against for employment because employers feared, rightly or wrongly, that their children would drive up health insurance rates, etc. Anyway, the point is, the law was crafted very broadly, and many of the politicians who supported it did so because they or close family members had a disability of some sort, so it was real, not an abstraction.The ADA was signed into law in July 1990. Within several years, several cases reached the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Supreme Court which ruled, on a very narrow, technical basis, in ways that were much stricter than what Congress intended (several politicians in question publicly said so) and against people who had various clear disabilities. At that time, the disability community began advocating for amendments to restore the original intent. The ADA Amendments Act, signed in September 2008, more clearly words the law to include disabilities that are episodic and may come and go. IBS fits that. The ADA Amendments Act also includes more examples of what constitutes a "major life activity" and what bodily parts/systems might be impaired. Digestion is specified as a major life activity, and the bowel is mentioned. So yes, IBS *is* covered under the ADA if you are impaired by it.

FYI, unfortunately, IBS is NOT one of the "maladies" covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act and so far we have no recourse for any disability coverage. This is one of the major hurdles we need to overcome . . . getting IBS recognized as a serious hindrance to daily living.While some of us have been fortunate enough to have understanding bosses, there are still many who have not been as lucky. I think a majority of bosses DON'T understand. It's a shame that we have to consider telling our boss about this condition in order to avoid future problems . . . health issues are really nobody's business. However, if it is enough to have an impact on your job, it's probably a good idea to be straight with the boss up front, armed with written information as many of you have suggested. However, I would leave it at that. Nobody is entitled to know the DETAILS of your specific situation. Furthermore, you do not HAVE to explain ANY of your situation to your employer if you really feel uncomfortable doing so. You cannot be discriminated against and can fight it if you really think the job is worth keeping.Bev







Advertisement


About Us | Contact Us | Advertise With Us | Disclaimer | Terms of Service | Crisis Resources

Irritable Bowel Syndrome |  Inflammatory Bowel Disease |  Crohn's Disease |  Ulcerative Colitis |  Fibromyalgia |  GERD - Reflux Disease


©Copyright 1995-2014 IBS Self Help and Support Group All rights reserved




This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. We comply with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here