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Trapped Gas in Rectum? Is it just me?


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#1 Guest_Darlene2_*

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Posted 08 February 2002 - 02:45 AM

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Hi Ya'llI get these spells of what feels like trapped gas in my rectum, usually when C is acting up. I've had IBS for 16 years now, It's always doing something crazy and new. I noticed also that when I get this feeling, the hemmies are acting up also... I get nervous about it, and I've caught myself unconsciously tightening up down there, which I think is adding to the problem. Am I the only person with this odd complaint?. Posted Image Any tipps to share?...


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#2 Kathleen M.

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Posted 08 February 2002 - 02:45 PM

Does the feeling go away after you eventually fart??Many people with IBS have feelings of "incomplete evacuation" or that "something is in there" but nothing comes out.That may or may not be gas trapped in there, particuarly if it goes away without there being a fart episode.K.
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#3 Guest_Artspirit_*

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Posted 10 February 2002 - 12:14 AM

Glad to meet you all. This is my first time on this board. I've had IBS most of my life. In the last few years it's become so bad that it often makes my life a living hell. I've read a couple of posts on here regarding gas that gets "trapped" near the rectum. I've experienced this but can always relieve it by pushing it out. Something that may contribute to gas trapped in this area could be a condition known as a rectocele. If you're female, it's a bulging of the rectum into the vagina. I've had one since I gave birth 21 years ago. Three years ago I had a hysterectomy which caused the symptoms of the rectocele to worsen. Often I actually have to press on the outer vaginal area as well as on the perineum (the area between the vagina and the rectum) in order to have a bowel movement. Sometimes this also expels the gas that gets trapped in the rectocele. Hope this helps anyone else who is experiencing this problem.

#4 saraheleanor

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Posted 10 February 2002 - 10:13 PM

Artspirit,Thank you for posting regarding rectoceles. I have had similar problems eliminating gas and stools (even soft stools) for the past 6 months. One doctor I saw told me I had a rectocele. He told me to press on the back vaginal wall. This sometimes helps push stool out and sometimes gets some of the gas out, but most of the time if it does work the relief is very temporary. On a good day, I am merely very uncomfortable on and off all day. On a bad day, this sort of blocked feeling creates a chain reaction when my colon wants to be very reactive to meals or exercise and I start having very bad cramps until I can finally get the stool or gas to pass.The doctor who diagnosed the rectocele suggested I have a colonoscopy to rule any other sorts of blockage out. He said the doctor who would do the colonoscopy could also line up treatment or surgery for the rectocele. As it turned out, the doctor who did the colonoscopy (which turned out fine) did not think I had a rectocele. He says I have a small cystocele, but that was it. At the time, I assumed he was a GI doctor. Now I've discovered he's a General Surgeon. So I've made an appointment with a GI doctor and a GYN figuring one of them may be able to finally diagnosis and treat my problem. The GYN can't see me until February 28 and the GI doctor can't see me until March 13. Since then, I saw another GP who didn't even examine me. He just talked to me. He said even if I did have a rectocele it wouldn't cause all this discomfort. He says the stools should pass through fine.In the meantime, I'm at wits end as to how to manage this situation. I'm so uncomfortable most of the time and the manipulation of the vaginal area and perineum area does not seem to fully clear the rectal area.Do you have any suggestions as to how I can make myself more comfortable? Also, do you happen to know of any tests I should be asking for? Thanks for your help.Sarah

#5 saraheleanor

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Posted 11 February 2002 - 12:13 AM

Artspirit,I was just wondering if there's a particular reason you or your doctor feel that surgery on your rectocele is not a viable alternative.Sarah

#6 saraheleanor

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Posted 12 February 2002 - 08:47 AM

Has anyone with the trapped rectal gas ever experienced on/off again symptoms of a bladder infection when they didn't actually have a bladder infection?That has happened to me a few times in the last few months. Last night I started to get the bladder infection feeling. It's very uncomfortable. Only once in the past few months did I actually have a bladder infection.I'm wondering if this sensation is due to all the extra pressure in the rectal/vaginal area.Sarah

#7 stinky too

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Posted 16 February 2002 - 10:37 PM

sarah, I have that problem and found when I eat to much fiber it can cause me to have a urine problem much like when I had a bladder infection.Artspirit, Yes I sometimes have to do that to get a movement started. Excuse my thoughts on this but I think of it as popping a pimple. Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#8 saraheleanor

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Posted 17 February 2002 - 02:04 AM

Thanks for your response, Joyce.I too have to try the pressure on the vaginal wall to get a movement going or to expel gas, but it doesn't always work for me. I wish there was something that worked most of the time.I see the GYN in two weeks. I'm hoping he'll be able to provide a definitive diagnosis about my possible rectocele. As I've said in previous posts, I had one doctor tell me I have a large rectocele that's causing my problems and another doctor who couldn't find the rectocele. I'm also scheduled for a CT abdominal scan next week. I'm not anticipating any remarkable findings in this exam, but I really feel that things have to be ruled out to get to the bottom of this mystery. Sarah

#9 saraheleanor

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Posted 23 February 2002 - 08:43 AM

I have difficulty expelling stool (even soft stool) and gas from my rectal area. I found an article on the Internet that was rather interesting. Here goes:"Some people have great difficulty emptying their rectum due to what is called rectal descent. Rectal descent is a problem that appears to be related to childbirth. When a women gives birth, the normal attachments of the rectum to the lower backbone may get stretched or torn. This tearing allows the rectum to fall into the pelvis where it assumes a horizontal position. The front of the rectum can fall into the top of the anal canal and block the anal opening. The normal rectum lies against the sacrum (lower backbone) in a gentle curve down to the anal opening. When a person moves his bowels, the muscles of the pelvic floor relax and the rectum swings down and straightens so it is almost straight up and down (vertical) over the anal opening. In this way the rectal contents can move straight out.When a person pushes to move his bowels, it increases the abdominal pressure. If the rectum is attached to the sacrum properly, the increased abdominal pressure squeezes the rectal contents out like toothpaste from a tube. The rectum is a soft pliable tube. If it is not firmly supported by the lower backbone, it slides down in the pelvis and blocks the anal opening.Let us compare the rectum to a sock. If you support the sock with one hand on either side of the top open end, then it is easy to put your foot into it and slide it all the way inside. If, however, the sock is lying on the floor not supported or held in place, then it will be very hard to put your foot into it, much less get your foot all of the way in. The same is true of the rectum. The hands supporting the sock are represented by the attachments of the top of the rectum to the backbone.Another comparison might be to a pair of pants. They are easy to put on if you lift them up with your hands on the waistline. It is more difficult to put them on if they are lying crumpled on the floor and you can't grab the waist band with your hands. It is easier to push something through a soft pliable tube if it is supported at the top and hanging vertically then if it is lying flat horizontally.Knowing this, you can predict the complaints that people with rectal descent have. If they don't have colonic inertia, they will have the usual amounts of stool getting down to the rectum daily. They will feel the urge to move their bowels; but, even with straining, the rectum will not empty. This differs from someone with colonic inertia. Someone with colonic inertia may not feel the need to move his bowels for a week or more at a time. Someone with rectal descent without colonic inertia will feel the need to move his bowels every day.It takes people with rectal descent a long time to move their bowels. They may try to move their bowels several times before they are able to. Even after they move their bowels, it may feel as if their rectum is still not empty.They may feel a mass pushing against their vagina or they may feel as if their rectum is dropping out of their pelvis. They may feel a weight down on the bottom of their pelvis.People with rectal descent have difficulty emptying their rectum. They must strain to move their bowels. They may have to put their fingers into their rectum or vagina, or push on their pelvic area, to get their bowels to move.When we operate on people with rectal descent we sometimes see that the rectum has fallen down into the pelvis and is just lying flat on the floor of the pelvis.Before talking about how to correct rectal descent let us discuss some other forms of rectal descent. The first is solitary rectal ulcer.Solitary Rectal Ulcer Sometimes rectal descent causes the front wall of the rectum to flop into the anal canal. Straining causes pressure on the front wall of the rectum and a pressure sore develops. This sore is called a solitary rectal ulcer. It has a white base and sharp distinct edges. When we see it, we can be certain that rectal descent is present. This solitary rectal ulcer can cause pain and bleeding. One person bled so much from her solitary rectal ulcer that she needed to receive seven units of blood. This can also occur in males. RectoceleRectocele is a bulge of the lower rectum into, over or behind the vagina. Rectoceles trap stool and may not empty. Rectoceles are probably more common in women after a hysterectomy. The rectum falls into the place of the uterus. The woman with a rectocele may need to put her finger into the vagina to push the stool out. Defecography demonstrates the rectum bulging forward.Stool softeners and fiber may help. If they do not, surgery may be needed. I believe that rectoceles are a form of rectal descent. They can only occur if the attachments between the rectum and the vagina are weakened, and if extra rectum is dragged down or stretched out to form the pouch. If the rectocele causes difficult rectal emptying, I believe that the associated rectal descent must be corrected. The surgery recommended for a symptomatic rectocele is the same operation done for rectal descentA type of rectocele repair can be done through the vagina, but this does not correct rectal descent. It often does not correct the rectal emptying problems associated with rectoceles.We can usually confirm that a woman has rectal descent by talking to her and examining her. We must confirm the diagnosis with defecography. Defecography uses video x-rays to look at the shape and position of the rectum as it empties. We describe this test later.Rectal Prolapse Another form of rectal descent is rectal prolapse. When the rectum falls down in the pelvis it can drop so far that it actually drops through the anal opening as a pink fleshy round lump. This is called rectal prolapse.Rectal prolapse can block the anal opening causing constipation. The prolapse can stretch the anal sphincter muscles and cause anal leakage (incontinence). Rectal prolapse is not a cancer and it will not turn into a cancer. Therefore, treatment is necessary only if it is causing a problem. Symptoms of prolapse which might indicate the need for surgery include persistent bleeding, chronic constipation, difficulty with rectal emptying, straining to move the bowels, mucous drainage, protruding lump, inability to control solid, liquid, or gas bowel movements, or progressive weakening of the anal sphincter muscles.The aim of the surgery is to remove the extra rectal length and re-suspend the rectum from the lower backbone. Prolapse can be repaired by either anal surgery or abdominal surgery. In the abdominal surgery, the sigmoid colon is removed and the rectum is sewn to the sacrum (just like the surgery for rectal descent).Another way to accomplish bowel shortening and re-suspension is to remove the extra rectal length through the anus. Then, the bowel ends are hooked together just above the anus. Removing all the excess bowel leaves the shortened rectum hanging from the inside of the abdomen on the left, by the spleen and ribs. This operation does not require an incision on the front of the abdomen and there is no risk of damage to the nerves of the ***** in men.If a person has rectal prolapse and fecal incontinence (the inability to control bowel movements), fixing the rectal prolapse about half the time also corrects the incontinence. However, if the sphincter muscles are very weak, fixing the prolapse will not correct the incontinence. Additional surgery may be needed to tighten the anal sphincter muscles.Adapted from Dr. Christopher Lahr's book "Shining Light on Constipation". For more information on this book, please visit Dr. Lahr's site: www.constipated.com.





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