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Cannabis and IBS


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#1 Guest_Pink Mist_*

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Posted 08 April 2001 - 07:48 PM

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I bumped into an old friend of mine the other day she too suffers from IBS C & D and has done since we left school. After chatting to her for a while she told me that for the last 2 years she has been have a joint in the evening and this has helped her with her IBS, she gets stressed quiet a bit but she has also found that when having a C day it helps her aswell as helps with the stress. I smoke cannabis years ago but don't know if it's work trying now.What are you thoughts? Apart from the fact I know it's not legal.------------------Pink


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#2 Guest_Kylie_*

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Posted 08 April 2001 - 09:46 PM

I understand cannabis has a very calmative effect on the system, and they even use cannabis extract in tablets for pain relief in cancer patients (don't ask me where), which may be something to enquire about,BUTI think having IBS is bad enough without stuffing up your body further by smoking cannabis. I'm sorry, I'm a wowser in this department, but at the end of the day cannabis is an addictive drug that has harmful long term implications for the body. Yes, cannabis does seem to have some good qualities, but studies show it can lead onto other addictions, has a degenerative effect on the brain and neurological system, and stuffs your lungs up as bad as tobacco.So the choice would be, explore other areas for your IBS, there are other options out there, or work on destroying the rest of your body by smoking cannabis. Kylie

#3 Mannie

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Posted 08 April 2001 - 10:18 PM

I smoke it in college, and there's one reason I wouldn't use it for IBS: Munchies. I would eat anything and everything in sight without being rational about what it will do to my system. Maybe when you do it regularly you don't get munchies, but I know everytime I did it, I felt like I was starving.

#4 WD40

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 02:03 AM

I only used it for severe nausea, and then only 2 hits. Worked wonders but the guilt wasn't worth it. It did get me through some really rough nights, though.[This message has been edited by WD40 (edited 04-08-2001).]

#5 Guest_JohnnyX_*

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 06:40 AM

I can't sleep - so this will be a long one.I must respectfully disagree with Kylie. Cannabis is not a gateway drug; the 'stepping stone' theory, as expounded by anti-cannabis persons, has no scientific basis whatsoever - it is merely another example of anti-pot rhetoric. Cannabis is certainly not addicting. Studies have shown that the theobromine in chocolate is more addicting than cannabis. The herb, however, can produce psychic dependence. Psychological addiction is a terrible thing. The most influential psychoactive component of cannabis is delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This also happens to be the one of the most studied cannabinoids (along with cannabidiol or CBD). The herb has been used since antiquity with no conspicuous repercussions. There has never been a documented case of cannabis death. Anecdotally, cannabis has been shown to reduce chemo-induced nausea in addtion to combating AIDS wasting syndrome. Under government auspices, clinical trials are currently underway to ascertain the benefits of marijuana. Interestingly enough, there is synthetic THC on the market. It is marketed as 'Dronabinol' and is a schedule II controlled substance. Doctors are urged not to prescribe it. Cancer patients have reported minor improvements with dronabinol. Smoking a joint, however, resulted in greater relief. One problem is that we live in a reductionist medical society. We attempt to identify the one chemical that is responsible for the desired result. But, perhaps some chemicals may work synergistically to produce the desired result. So concentrated THC may not be as efficacious as a joint. I will note, however, that smoking a substance is a horrible delivery mechanism and not healty. Drug companies are currently working on transdermal cannabis patches.The bottom line is that one should never use a substance to mask an underlying mental disturbance. Using pot to numb depression or anxiety will invariably cause more damage than good. The root of the problem must be treated with psychiatry, CBT, spirituality or whatever - not drugs.I found pot to induce negative effects on my intestinal health. Of course, people respond to various chemicals in various ways.X

#6 Starry Night

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 11:55 AM

I am wondering, if a person is taking an SSRI, if pot would interact with the brain any differently than without the SSRI.Many people I know find that pot calms them, and allows them to focus...especially types who always have a zillion things going on in their heads.OK, I admit to doing a field test on this one...once...out of desperation with my IBS, of course...I found that it produced a calm and stress-free state such as I had not experienced in months. I was so relaxed. And stress is certainly an IBS trigger.I am opposed to smoking in general, whether it be tobacco or cannibis...not good for your lungs. That patch could be a godsend for cancer and AIDS patients, perhaps.I have long believed marijuana should be legal. It is far less harmful than alcohol.

#7 Nikki

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 02:52 PM

Well, what can i say. I have smoked it previously, but havn't done so in a long while.Cannabis is NOT addictive, but people can often feel they psychologically need it. Tis true it can me more damaging than tobacco. The only thing that makes it addictive is the tobacco youmix it with, then you become addictedt ot the tobacco as opposed to the ganja.As long as you're careful, make sure you know exactly whats in it before you buy it or smoke it. Don;t smoke it if you suspect that it may have been mixed with something dodgy. And make sure you're in a safe environment when you do, not in some backstreet somewhere. It have can have some strange effects sometimes, but basically is pretty much a harmless drug.If it were legalised it would regulate what does into it and the quantities in which it was sold. I think it should be legalised. It seems unlikly to happen in England though. I probably wouldn't smoke it even if it was. I hope no cops read this post. Maybe it should be moved to the adult meeting place?
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#8 eric

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 03:02 PM

The doctors at the research place I am associated with have mentioned they are interested in studying it. I of course voluntered, but told them if it is a placebo I will know. An interesting doctor discussion on medical Marijuana. http://www.medscape.com/medscape/features/....spotlight.html A movie some might remember. http://www.movieflix.com/cgi-bin/action.pl...=1&movie_id=118 ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#9 Guest_slantgrl_*

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 03:21 PM

ANTI-VOMITING RECEPTOR IN MARIJUANA DISCOVEREDA Missouri researcher has recently found connections between a cannabinoidreceptor and emesis, according to an article in the February issue ofNeuropsychopharmacology. http://neurology.medscape.com/33290.rhtml?srcmp=neur-020201 You may have to register first, but it's free.

#10 Ugh

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 06:12 PM

Just my 2 cents... when I smoke weed I don't really notice an affect on the IBS.Someone asked about SSRIs and weed reactions. I don't know for sure, but from the times I've briefly been on drugs like that (SSRI) I do believe there is interactions. I've heard the same from other people. It's hard to say, because in general I think it affects each person differently. Some people get more mellow, some people go the opposite way.As for the legalities of it...yeah it should be legal, but lets face it, it's basically legal right now. The only thing bad about it is the smoke aspect that could cause lung damage. Alcohol is far, far worse in terms of damage to society, causing violent behaviour, etc. Everything in moderation I guess.

#11 Guest_Pink Mist_*

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 06:47 PM

Thanks for the response.Well last night I had a #### night, I had raving tooth ache and my IBS was having a field day. Let's put it this way I had a few puff and found it very mellowing and it helped alot. Within 20 mins I was chilled and my IBS and toothache eased up!....I know this isnt a cure but it's nice to know that if I cant cope with IBS and its due to me stressing out then I can find a quick solution. I know cannabis isnt addictive for me personally but I suppose it depends on who you are.------------------Pink

#12 Starry Night

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Posted 10 April 2001 - 05:21 AM

I'm glad you got a little relief, Pink Taking these SSRI's is pretty new to me...I'm not used to taking meds that affect my brain so much.The mellowing effect of the pot was so great... but since the SSRI is supposed to help mellow me, I didn't know if together I might get too mellow (if that's possible). I may do more field research on this thread's topic, but my medications have changed since the first trial, and I don't want to have a problem with the combo...I also haven't had a drop to drink since starting the SSRI (Zoloft)... I know it can intensify the effects of alcohol, and alcohol is not my gut's friend, but I do miss having the occassinal drink. Anyone drink or smoke (not cigs) while taking Zoloft or something similar?

#13 methical

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Posted 10 April 2001 - 07:48 PM

if there are any ibs-related topics of which i could say a useful thing or two about, it would have to be school w/ibs, and marijuana w/ ibs.i've been smoking marijuana everyday since my ibs problems started surfacing. that was about 2 years ago, when before i even heard of ibs, i had been diagnosed with having an ulcer and so could not really drink alcohol for the time being; i conveniently started smoking weed a lot more instead. to make a long story short, i found that the weed made me feel almost 100% better most of the time, for the rest of the day. since then i would start off the day as normally as i can, trying to be as productive as i can, but we all know how difficult that could be at times. eventually, whether it be an hour after waking up or the end of the day, i would smoke and feel that relief we are so desperate for.i think, from what i've read and heard, that the marijuana does sort of "numb" your body, maybe even numbing that connection between the brain and the gut. paradoxically, being high on cannabis heightens certain senses and sensations; with ibs, sometimes i could feel my colon and/or anus with heightened sensitivity, which believe me, caused tremendous anxiety in me at first (my anus would feel like i'm pooping right there!) though those "raw days" still heighten my sensation down there when i smoke, it doesn't really bother me anymore. besides, i'm high and not feeling stomach pain anymore by this time.while smoking pot has saved me from much of the daily anguish and suffering of ibs, it has also gotten me psychologically addicted- to crave the high is one thing, but to crave being high to calm your colon and your tears makes marijuana a whole lot more addicting. could you imagine if you felt like your ibs symptoms could all dissappear for the rest of the day from a few puffs? not to mention "college life," and not being able to just hang out without the normalcy felt from smoking. as a result, i smoke everyday; for a year or so i would get angry at myself and tried to quit marijuana altogether, but it was too difficult, with how good the relief felt. more recently, i've been using the philosophy that i'll smoke only on those days when i'm just a total mess; when i'm not in that "urgency" zone, i'll be productive, so that my life could be continued (ibs has ruined me- i gotta find some insurance, get my school probs straightened, research ibs obsessively, and finally the trial&error, what-meds-work-for-my-life thing).so far this plan of mine has been very, very slowly working out. one of the worst things about marijuana addiction has got to be the laziness. one could say i kinda did my own unoffical clincial trial on the marijuana and its effects on ibsers so i guess smoking pot could bring temporary relief to at least some of us, but it's obviously not a great habit to pick up, and i think it could be especially addictive for people who feel chronic pain and anxiety without it...just my 2 cents, hope this helps in some way...meth

#14 Guest_Pink Mist_*

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Posted 10 April 2001 - 08:40 PM

Thanks Meth what a good insight :(I know what your saying. I think some of it has to do with wether you have an addictive personality or not ( I think someone said about it when I asked about diazepam ). I smoked cannabis on and off. I smoked it when I was at college ( to be hip ) then I smoked it again when I was having a bad time personally and then when I got through it I quit. I think I will try cannabis on and off for a while and see where it takes me, maybe it will help me and others. As for the legal side of things....They have been saying for years that it should be legal and I agree.------------------Pink

#15 Guest_OnTheLooAgain_*

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Posted 20 April 2001 - 08:10 PM

Well my story is the opposite, kind off.I have been smoking cannabis every evening after work for about 10 years and I've been fit as a fiddle.A couple of weeks ago I gave up and within a few days I started to have constant and extreme cramps, D and C. The doc has diagnosed IBS.I cant get any till next weekend, but I will see if it helps. I am pretty sure it will becuase of the calming and muscle relaxant properties.However I am not going back to smoking every day because it could be disguising other symptons and more serious problems (not that IBS isnt serious). I will however use it for the more extreme moments and when I really cant get any sleep.IMO - Cannabis is **NOT** addictive. I had one sleepless night and a pretty irritable day but after that I havent had any cravings or withdrawl symptons. I am still breaking the 'habbit' of getting home and sparking up but that is the same with TV. Take my TV away and I would die.Smoking cannabis of course has it problems with inhaling hot smoke. The thought of eating it kind of scares me a bit, but may work even better, getting straight to problem area. Is anyone eating it ? How about making a tea with it, now Im sure that could do some real calming.Good to see other people willing to try it despite all the government propaganda and false press.Looking forward to hearing more on this subject.------------------If I posted this then I managed to get off the loo for 5 minutes.

#16 Guest_Ggirl_*

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Posted 20 April 2001 - 08:26 PM

I just want to thank everyone for the really mature and honest dialogue about pot, or cannibis. I am not a smoker, never have been and never will. But I did "experiment" with pot less than 5 times in college to see what it was about. I decided it wasn;t for me and I don't need it for medical reasons, so I don't smoke it at all. But I'm sure there are some really positive benefits for people who are suffering and i agree it should by all means be legalized. I am not a drinker either and I think alcohol should be severely restricted. Anyway, this has to be one of the most objective threads about pot I've ever seen. Thanks everyone.

#17 NickT

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Posted 20 April 2001 - 09:50 PM

Is this the answer for hopeless dopeheads? http://www.newscientist.com/nsplus/insight...stheanswer.html

#18 Starry Night

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Posted 20 April 2001 - 11:15 PM

I am still wondering if it is bad to combine cannibis with an SSRI... And maybe someone can tell me soon? lolHappy 4/20!

#19 DonnaDB

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Posted 21 April 2001 - 03:05 AM

atp, I take zoloft and occasionally partake in a little herbal pain relief (you know what I mean) and I don't really see any problems with combining the two. Just be careful and use good common sense and RELAX!!! Hope this helps!

#20 Guest_Pink Mist_*

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Posted 21 April 2001 - 08:06 PM

Well its been nearly two weeks, and on and off I have been smoking pot to see if it has helped me and my IBS.It has and I am sooooo pleased, I have only smoked it when really stressed out and I have only had enough to chill me out and it helps me my tum settle. Normally nothing will stop me panicing about where there is a loo but today I went to town for 4 hours with my Mum and didnt need the rush for the loo at all. I hope this has helps others.Personally I will carry on, and sod the legal side, I have no guilt what so ever.------------------Pink





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