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Bread and Pasta causing bad gas???


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#1 SusanK

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Posted 03 December 2006 - 07:52 PM

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Does anyone other than me get gas pains and well, I am a wee bit embarrassed to say it, but smelly gas from things like Bread and Pasta?I have had several tests with no answers but I am starting to really watch what I am eating and today I had bread from a bakery, just french bread, and I made pasta.. and within 30 minutes I had gas pains and smelly gas?Ok, right now I am so thankful that no one can see me!Thank you for any input~


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#2 overitnow

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Posted 03 December 2006 - 09:08 PM

Could be a sensitivity to gluten. Try some gluten free breads (spelt or all rye are two places to start) and rice or corn--if that is not also a problem--pastas. By eliminating wheat and corn my wife and I have been able to significantly lower our gas production.Mark
My story of beating IBS and my other chronic conditions: http://www.ibsgroup....total-wellness/

#3 Nanobug

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Posted 03 December 2006 - 10:04 PM

quote:
and within 30 minutes I had gas pains and smelly gas?
Small intestine bacterial overgrowth.

#4 flux

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 06:58 AM

quote:
Small intestine bacterial overgrowth.
Spare us.
quote:
I made pasta.. and within 30 minutes I had gas pains and smelly gas?
The pain most likely not from gas. The odor is from the gas already in the colon, probably being pushed out by a gastrolonic response.
I am not a doctor, but utilize sources of information not readily available to the public. Some of this information may contradict what you think you know and some of it may sound harsh, but the information is what it is, and you got it here for free. I am just a messenger. Always consult a real doctor.

#5 SusanK

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 07:34 AM

Thank you for the replies.. but I am confused. SIBO sounds like me but I don't suffer from D.?Flux, if you read this would you mind expanding on your response, I am not sure I understand. I don't understand the medical terminology.Thanks

#6 Nanobug

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 07:39 AM

quote:
SIBO sounds like me but I don't suffer from D.?
You don't have to suffer from D to have SIBO. If you want additional information, you may want to read the book A New IBS Solution (Paperback) by Mark Pimentel

#7 flux

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 12:43 PM

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Flux, if you read this would you mind expanding on your response, I am not sure I understand. I don't understand the medical terminology.
It's normal for the colon to become active shortly after eating. So if there is gas present there, it might come out then. It might be that your system is for whatever reason more sensitive to these foods and hence more active then.
quote:
You don't have to suffer from D to have SIBO.
You don't have to suffer from anything to have it. Even healthy people would get the diagnosis based on how the testing might be conducted.
I am not a doctor, but utilize sources of information not readily available to the public. Some of this information may contradict what you think you know and some of it may sound harsh, but the information is what it is, and you got it here for free. I am just a messenger. Always consult a real doctor.

#8 Tony13

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 01:15 PM

Hi Susan,My case is very similar to yours: Whenever I eat bread, pasta or other wheat or bran derivatives, I got bloated and tons of gas.I was tested negative for Celiac Disease, which determines whether you’re allergic to Gluten, a protein in wheat. I then was diagnosed with Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth, SIBO and got Antibiotics (Xifaxan) for it and the gassiness decreased noticeably, but the bad odor remained, like fecal or garbage – this is my case, maybe not yours --.I’m trying some natural supplements with the enzyme Amylase, to help breaking down carbs, and it seems to help. The one I’m taking is Enzymedica’s Digest.I’d recommend to ask yout Dr to get tested for celiac, and discuss the possibility you have SIBO, I would not discard it. We’re here to help, but some people have different ways to do it, may be a bit harsh, but it’s help.Take care, Tony

#9 SusanK

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 05:48 PM

Thank you Tony. I am seeing a new GI in a couple of weeks, as I have been reading on both Celiacs and SIBO, I am going to ask the GI about that.I have Digestive Enzymes, sometimes they help, sometimes they don't.I just tried Activia by Dannon, and am now in pain!!I guess I can scratch that one off my list..thanks again, I really appreciate it~

#10 Nanobug

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 07:27 PM

quote:
I just tried Activia by Dannon, and am now in pain!
It could be a normal, and beneficial, reaction to a change in intestinal flora. In any case, if you have SIBO, you could probably wait until after treatment.

#11 Nanobug

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 07:35 PM

quote:
I’m trying some natural supplements with the enzyme Amylase, to help breaking down carbs, and it seems to help.
Unfortunately, amylase won't touch some potential serious offenders like lactose and fructose, among others. GasStop as a bunch of extra carb enzymes and it would probably be a good idea to get some lactase as well (just noticed DigestMORE‡ Ultra; could be a good "complete" one). Oh, and there is no fructase available, at least to my knowledge.

#12 Tony13

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 10:11 PM

Thanks Nanobug for the DigestMore reference. I already used GasStop, but didn’t help me. Susan, in addition of SIBO and Celiac, you can also ask to be checked for Fructose and Lactose Intolerance, as these also can cause gas and bloating.I also noticed fibrous carbs, like bran, bananas, apples; potatoes produce lots of gas in me. It’s painful living this way, but some of us don’t have options.Hpe it helps , Tony

#13 Nanobug

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 11:18 PM

quote:
I already used GasStop, but didn’t help me
Quick question: have you tried to follow Pimentel's dietary guidelines, as described in his book? I followed those guidelines for two weeks and barely had any gas!

#14 flux

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 11:44 PM

quote:
I then was diagnosed with Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth, SIBO
But the information you provided contradicted this diagnosis.
quote:
Unfortunately, amylase won't touch some potential serious offenders like lactose and fructose, among others
The poster indicated a problem with odoriferous gas. That eliminates these sugars as offenders at any level.
quote:
I followed those guidelines for two weeks and barely had any gas!
Who would?
quote:
Oh, and there is no fructase available, at least to my knowledge.
In a Martian chemistry lab perhaps?
I am not a doctor, but utilize sources of information not readily available to the public. Some of this information may contradict what you think you know and some of it may sound harsh, but the information is what it is, and you got it here for free. I am just a messenger. Always consult a real doctor.

#15 joelcoqui

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 07:57 AM

I find that when I eat lots of bread before and with any meal(pasta especially), it binds you better. Did you ever see what happens to bread when it gets wet? It becomes this mealy sticky mush. I have been stable for a week and I believe the bread is helping.

#16 Soph

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 11:31 AM

if bREAD PASTA, BEER, sugar cause you gas , smell, pain bloating1 You have celiacs disease2 sibo3 and DEFINATELY MORE LIKELY YOU HAVE A YEAST OVERGROWTH WHICH PRESENTS ITSELF AS IBSTAKE ANTI FUNGAL DRUGSCUT OUT YEAST ANS SUGAR FROM DIETTAKE PROBIOTICS, GARLIC CAPSULES,VITAKLENZ.OR THREELAC ..YOU WILL BEGIN BE HAVING A FLARE UP...AND FEELING HUNGRY TIRED, U WILL CRAVE BREAD OR SUGAR..AND FEEL LIKE S***STICK TO THE DETOX...THESE SYMPTOMS WILL DISAPPEAR, AND YOU WILL BECOME HEALTHYTHE HORMONOL PILL, ANTIBIOTICS ( ESPECIALLY AMOXYCILLIN) ALCOHOL , AND STRESS, ALL MAKE A YEAST INFECTION GROWYEAST INFECTIONS CAUSE CONSTIPATION , DIARREAH CHANCE IN APPETITE, TIREDNESS, ANXIETY IBS,...SORE THROAT GLANDS UP IN THROAT ITCHY SKIN ETC,, ..WEIRD SMELL AROUND UR BODY,,LIKE SULFUR OR BURNING BREAD, ETC...SO IF U HAVE ANY OF THESE SYMPTOMS TREAT YOURSELF FOR YEAST INFECTION!

#17 Kathleen M.

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 12:35 PM

Or you have IBS and do not tolerate the very very very normal increase in gas production by the same very normal colonic bacteria every single prerson has living in their colons..Wheat has resistant starch in it.Resistant starch reaches the colon. By definition resistant starch is the starch human beings do not break down on their own, so it has to reach the colon as it can't get out any other way and it is not broken down.Any carb that we do not digest that reaches the colon will be digested by the bacteria that live in there. Many normal bacteria that live in there produce gas when they digest carbs. Probiotic bacteria do not do that because by definition they are the ones with metabolisms that do not produce gas when they digest the carbs.It doesn't mean you have celiac or SIBO or Candida. You can have this symptom with IBS and have NONE of them.Really, you can have IBS and have symptoms. Not every symptom is a sign that you have something other than IBS. (and pretty much everything typical of IBS is claimed by someone to be a sign of something else).K.
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#18 Nanobug

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 12:46 PM

quote:
Probiotic bacteria do not do that because by definition they are the ones with metabolisms that do not produce gas when they digest the carbs.
Hmm, this is interesting, as I always assumed that probiotic bacteria could also produce gas. Do you have any references for this? In any case, it could explain why dysbiosis, and its correction, would cause excessive flatulence and flatulence elimination, respectively.

#19 Kathleen M.

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 02:50 PM

Gosh it's been a long time. Several years ago when flux brought this up I went looking for the information. Lord knows where that is now, a quick google didn't bring it up, but it might be in the archives here somewhere.Basically it has to do with going to lactic acid in the fermenation rather than to CO2 and H20. I think it may be an adaptation to liking to live in places where there isn't always a lot of oxygen.After all there has to be some defining characteristic.Just think of the difference between the fermentation of yogurt or beer vs bread or swiss cheese. Some things produce a lot of gas and that causes the dough to rise, or bubbles to form either in a liquid or a solid. Yogurt doesn't tend to be frothy because the lactose is not broken all the way down.I don't know that we are certain that any of the thousands of other normal non-probiotic bacteria mean you have dysbiosis, or not having as many probiotic bacteria as someone else does either.There are a lot of claims about what is "normal" but I'm not sure I'm really convinced we actually know what the full range of what normal people with normal fart production, etc. really have in there. Not everything in there is easy to culture and PCR results of stool from what I remember tend to show there is a lot more in there that we don't know about than what we do.Add to that we don't really understand fully how any of these bacteria by themselves, or in groups interact with the host. We know there are some interactions, and I'm not sure we know what is ideal to have in there vs what people like to think is ideal to have in there. Having a lot of methanogens might make you gassy, but they tend to supress the ones that make H2S and there are various assorted papers about which state might be better. I've seen good things and bad things about a lot of the bacteria that get labels of good or bad. I wish it were a lot easier than it is.Probiotic bacteria tend to be non-permanent residents of the colon. They hang out, but your levels tend to change based on how much you dump in at what sort of interval. So I don't know if you can really say what the "normal" level is. It is going to depend a lot on what someone eats or is exposed to regularly.Personally I found with L. reuteri that I went from a lot of farts a day to practically none. Stool went from floating all the time to sinking. Even when the farting starts back up (which I can use several different probiotics to control) I usually still have sinking stools. My fart frequency was well above the usually listed normal range, but not so high that it was seriously abnormal. I had this elevated fart frequency before the IBS was bad, while the IBS was bad, and after the IBS was back under good control. Now when the IBS was bad it was harder to hold it, but I didn't fart more than I did before, I just had pain when I held it in.K.
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#20 Nanobug

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 03:47 PM

Thanks for the explanation, Kathleen.I did a few searches on PubMed and end up stumbing on this article: Fructooligosaccharides and Lactobacillus acidophilus modify gut microbial populations, total tract nutrient digestibilities and fecal protein catabolite concentrations in healthy adult dogs. One interesting conclusion, for me at least, was that "Lactobacillus acidophilus supplementation also may increase the concentration of potentially toxic volatile sulfur compounds found in feces". One can found, just above table 10, that "Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol concentrations were highest in fecal samples from dogs fed LAC + sucrose". This suggests to me that for people trying to get rid of smelly farts/stools, acidophilus is a big no-no. Would be interesting to know whether other Lactobacilli strains exhibit the same problem.





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