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Anyone tried completely starch free diet?


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#1 Jan8

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Posted 21 May 2004 - 11:13 AM

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Have always thought that carb reduction helped but not enough to make it worth the hell of being carb free. Have read that starch free (takes a bit of time and effort to test foods) can give desired results. No IBS,what joy. I'm just starting starch free, day one and feeling fair. Seems that even in some similar food groups some will be high starch while other low. Anyone know of low starch food list, it would be a great help.Jan8


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#2 Kathleen M.

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Posted 21 May 2004 - 12:59 PM

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If you want starch free that means avoiding EVERY grain (whole grains tend to have less total starch, but may have too much if you are trying for starch free diet) So no breads pastas or other baked goods.Every starchy veggie (Potatoes...maybe even sweet potatoes...peas and corn)I think all the beans would be banned as well.Atkins Induction phase lists would probably give you a good thing, but you could add most fruits to that (but some fruits have sorbitol and that may be as bad as starches).For a somewhat more generous list use South Beach Diet or Glucose Revolution. SBD, probably phase I (but it includes some starchy foods you wouldn't have on Atkins, because it looks at Glycemic Index, not grams of carbs).Resistant stach may be what you want to avoid (it is what you do not absorb, so foods high in it may be more problematic for causing gas which is what most people are trying to avoid by going low-stach)Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jun;56(6):500-5. Related Articles, Links �� Resistant starch content in a selection of starchy foods on the Swedish market.Liljeberg Elmstahl H.Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Helena.Elmstahl###inl.lth.seOBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the resistant starch (RS) content in a selection of typical starchy foods on the Swedish market. In addition, the daily RS intake was estimated from Swedish food consumption data. DESIGN: The major forms of RS, including physically encapsulated starch, were determined with an in vitro method using chewing as a pre-step before enzymatic incubation. SETTING: The study was performed at the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Six healthy subjects were used to chew the food products before enzymatic incubation of the samples. RESULTS: Twenty-five cereal, potato and legume products were included in the study. The highest RS concentration was noted in the legume group (9.5-11.1% total starch basis). Commercially processed potato products were found to have a higher RS content (4.8-5.9%), compared with boiled potatoes (2.0%). Among the cereal products, bread with enclosure of intact rye grains, barley flakes and semolina porridge, respectively, were identified to have a RS level in the higher range (4.5-6.0%). The daily RS intake was estimated to be 3.2 g. CONCLUSIONS: The main RS sources in the Swedish diet are bread and potato products, which contribute approximately 1.3 and 1.2 g RS per day, respectively. Based on food habits the RS intake may vary considerably, thus when added to dietary fibre intake, the contribution of RS may be of nutritional importance for certain individuals.Lists somethings in the Swedish diet so legumes, potataoes other than boiled, and rye and semolina (pasta) grains are mostly bad...but this is not that inclusiveWhite Rice has a lot of starch, but most of it is non-resistant and most IBSers tolerate it well, for example. This is also why it tends to have a high glycemic index, it goes rapidly into the blood raising glucose levels.On the other hand, it does have some potential health benefits, so I don't know what avoiding it totally forever might cause down the road http://www.preparedfoods.com/CDA/ArticleIn...,113218,00.html Don't know how much help this has been. K.
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#3 Kathleen M.

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Posted 21 May 2004 - 12:59 PM

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If you want starch free that means avoiding EVERY grain (whole grains tend to have less total starch, but may have too much if you are trying for starch free diet) So no breads pastas or other baked goods.Every starchy veggie (Potatoes...maybe even sweet potatoes...peas and corn)I think all the beans would be banned as well.Atkins Induction phase lists would probably give you a good thing, but you could add most fruits to that (but some fruits have sorbitol and that may be as bad as starches).For a somewhat more generous list use South Beach Diet or Glucose Revolution. SBD, probably phase I (but it includes some starchy foods you wouldn't have on Atkins, because it looks at Glycemic Index, not grams of carbs).Resistant stach may be what you want to avoid (it is what you do not absorb, so foods high in it may be more problematic for causing gas which is what most people are trying to avoid by going low-stach)Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jun;56(6):500-5. Related Articles, Links �� Resistant starch content in a selection of starchy foods on the Swedish market.Liljeberg Elmstahl H.Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Helena.Elmstahl###inl.lth.seOBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the resistant starch (RS) content in a selection of typical starchy foods on the Swedish market. In addition, the daily RS intake was estimated from Swedish food consumption data. DESIGN: The major forms of RS, including physically encapsulated starch, were determined with an in vitro method using chewing as a pre-step before enzymatic incubation. SETTING: The study was performed at the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Six healthy subjects were used to chew the food products before enzymatic incubation of the samples. RESULTS: Twenty-five cereal, potato and legume products were included in the study. The highest RS concentration was noted in the legume group (9.5-11.1% total starch basis). Commercially processed potato products were found to have a higher RS content (4.8-5.9%), compared with boiled potatoes (2.0%). Among the cereal products, bread with enclosure of intact rye grains, barley flakes and semolina porridge, respectively, were identified to have a RS level in the higher range (4.5-6.0%). The daily RS intake was estimated to be 3.2 g. CONCLUSIONS: The main RS sources in the Swedish diet are bread and potato products, which contribute approximately 1.3 and 1.2 g RS per day, respectively. Based on food habits the RS intake may vary considerably, thus when added to dietary fibre intake, the contribution of RS may be of nutritional importance for certain individuals.Lists somethings in the Swedish diet so legumes, potataoes other than boiled, and rye and semolina (pasta) grains are mostly bad...but this is not that inclusiveWhite Rice has a lot of starch, but most of it is non-resistant and most IBSers tolerate it well, for example. This is also why it tends to have a high glycemic index, it goes rapidly into the blood raising glucose levels.On the other hand, it does have some potential health benefits, so I don't know what avoiding it totally forever might cause down the road http://www.preparedfoods.com/CDA/ArticleIn...,113218,00.html Don't know how much help this has been. K.
My story of beating IBS: My Story with IBS
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#4 Jan8

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 02:12 AM

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Komottus thank you for all your information. Very much appreaciated. Will I think have to cheat a little and except that some small amounts will make their way into my diet. As you point out, long term it would more than likely have some rather unwanted side effects.Do feel it is worth a shot though, I'm positive my proplems are mostly diet related. Eat a banana or muffin, to much bread etc. and I'm in trouble. Interesting that rice and understandably potato seem to be no go for me.Will let you know how it goes, still feeling some improvement and havent managed to be completely starch free yet and its very much early days.Jan8

#5 Jan8

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 02:12 AM

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Komottus thank you for all your information. Very much appreaciated. Will I think have to cheat a little and except that some small amounts will make their way into my diet. As you point out, long term it would more than likely have some rather unwanted side effects.Do feel it is worth a shot though, I'm positive my proplems are mostly diet related. Eat a banana or muffin, to much bread etc. and I'm in trouble. Interesting that rice and understandably potato seem to be no go for me.Will let you know how it goes, still feeling some improvement and havent managed to be completely starch free yet and its very much early days.Jan8

#6 Daisysp

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 02:29 AM

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I do starch free daily as a regular diet, and it feels so much better than not. I don't eat any grains, wheats, breads, pastas, rice, crackers, potatoes or beans/legumes. I don't even eat fruit as it's too much sugar for my IBS. All starches are sugars, so it may be you need to not only eliminate all starches, yet all forms of sugars also. I only eat proteins and vegetables now, and feel tons better !!! It's hard to do, especially with a family, yet it's so worth it. I do cheat now and then, yet it's small stuff and rarely ever heavy like bread or pasta.
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No Grain, No Pain !!
Personal Trainer and Nutritional Consultant. (40% of my clients cane to me with IBS).

#7 Daisysp

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 02:29 AM

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I do starch free daily as a regular diet, and it feels so much better than not. I don't eat any grains, wheats, breads, pastas, rice, crackers, potatoes or beans/legumes. I don't even eat fruit as it's too much sugar for my IBS. All starches are sugars, so it may be you need to not only eliminate all starches, yet all forms of sugars also. I only eat proteins and vegetables now, and feel tons better !!! It's hard to do, especially with a family, yet it's so worth it. I do cheat now and then, yet it's small stuff and rarely ever heavy like bread or pasta.
IBS-D (used to be C) for 8 yrs.
No Grain, No Pain !!
Personal Trainer and Nutritional Consultant. (40% of my clients cane to me with IBS).

#8 Bewitched-Bothered and Bewildered

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 02:33 AM

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Daisysp-What do you eat instead?
***Bewitched***-AKA-Wendi-poo/Severe IBS-constipation,depression,Anxiety..........

#9 Bewitched-Bothered and Bewildered

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 02:33 AM

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Daisysp-What do you eat instead?
***Bewitched***-AKA-Wendi-poo/Severe IBS-constipation,depression,Anxiety..........

#10 gilly

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 04:22 AM

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Hi I have been reading about this recently for a no starch site(not for IBS for ankylosing spondylitis) look here " target="_blank">www.kickas.org I started thinking about resistant starch when I read a brochure about fibre and the complexities of digestion (24 pages long from the Australian gut foundation)The thing I had never realised before is that rice is digested differently depending on whether cooked by the absorption method (rice cooker) or boiled and drained (less resistant starch therefore digested differently.) Resistant starch is very good for the gut (anticancer effects) but perhaps not so good for IBS people.I am experimenting with rice cooking which is the only starch my daugter eats a lot of to see whether rinsing off the rice is better.It would be annoying if it did because the rice cooker is the best appliance I have ever bought.I have ordered the IBS no starch diet (Carol Sinclair) to read.It is a bit like the SCD but less strict on sugar I think. Worth a try since after recent trips to Doctors the medical profession has absolutely NOTHING to offer.No lotronex here even since doctors wont give us a prescription even to try lotronex (Its not on the market here yet I would get it through Global Rx)They are now so scared of being sued since all the insurance problems.The patient is the last priority! Gilly

#11 gilly

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 04:22 AM

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Hi I have been reading about this recently for a no starch site(not for IBS for ankylosing spondylitis) look here " target="_blank">www.kickas.org I started thinking about resistant starch when I read a brochure about fibre and the complexities of digestion (24 pages long from the Australian gut foundation)The thing I had never realised before is that rice is digested differently depending on whether cooked by the absorption method (rice cooker) or boiled and drained (less resistant starch therefore digested differently.) Resistant starch is very good for the gut (anticancer effects) but perhaps not so good for IBS people.I am experimenting with rice cooking which is the only starch my daugter eats a lot of to see whether rinsing off the rice is better.It would be annoying if it did because the rice cooker is the best appliance I have ever bought.I have ordered the IBS no starch diet (Carol Sinclair) to read.It is a bit like the SCD but less strict on sugar I think. Worth a try since after recent trips to Doctors the medical profession has absolutely NOTHING to offer.No lotronex here even since doctors wont give us a prescription even to try lotronex (Its not on the market here yet I would get it through Global Rx)They are now so scared of being sued since all the insurance problems.The patient is the last priority! Gilly

#12 gilly

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 04:34 AM

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The address for the gut foundation (They have many very interesting booklets for sale_not sure aabout international) There is one for IBS one called dietary fibre and health etc www.gut.nsw.edu.au

#13 gilly

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 04:34 AM

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The address for the gut foundation (They have many very interesting booklets for sale_not sure aabout international) There is one for IBS one called dietary fibre and health etc www.gut.nsw.edu.au

#14 gilly

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 04:44 AM

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tried to edit >Link should be www.kickas.org If it doesnt work this time please try another way.

#15 gilly

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 04:44 AM

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tried to edit >Link should be www.kickas.org If it doesnt work this time please try another way.

#16 Arnie W

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 07:29 AM

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I am so glad that this subject has been raised, as I was going to start a similar thread myself.Gilly, you will be interested to know that I went to a launch of The IBS Low-Starch Diet, by Carol Sinclair, two days ago. This is an excellent, thought-provoking book, which I have read and re-read. I have actually made reference to the book and the diet a few times on this forum over the last few weeks, with next to no response. Now the timing is right, and I hope that many people on this board consider it in their search for improvement for their symptoms.When I first read the book, I felt a very strong urge to contact the author, but couldn't find a way of doing so. A couple of weeks ago I just happened to notice an advert for Carol Sinclair's book launch. She is a New Zealander who was visiting here, but I understand now lives in England. There was no way I could miss meeting her, despite a fairly long, arduous journey by public transport way oner the other side of town. The purpose of my trip was not just to ask her a couple of personal questions relating to the diet, but also to invite her to participate on this site, because the description of many posters' symptoms fit in so much with the symptoms which Carol USED to have (pain from IBS and AS) and I felt that her diet would be such a blessing for many people. I can't understand why there was so little interest in my previous posts, but I hope that some ears prick up this time.What is interesting is Carol's explanation of the link between AS/IBS and the HLA B-27 gene. A blood test will reveal whether you have this gene, and if so, you will probably have elevated levels of Klebsiella bacteria, which thrive on the starch.Carol said that she would email me when she returns home and I'm sure she will oblige with sharing with us and answering questions when I give her the link to the site.In this book, Carol informs how to test for starch and methods of eliminating it. Some people will not have to give up all forms of starch, but others might be affected by something as simple as the starch in their medication and supplements. So, be careful, Jan8. If you want to succeed, avoid cheating! There's no need for it if you follow Carol's advice, and the book makes clear what food you can eat.For now, avoid bread, cakes, potatoes and pasta. Consider avoiding root veggies and all grains - rice might be ok for some.Salad veggies seem ok and most fruit, apparently not bananas. Meat is fine. You're allowed alcohol and chocolate, but that mightn't be for everyone. Maybe wait until further down the track.BTW, there is a large selection of starch-free recipes. I visited the AS site after first reading the book, gilly. It is helpful, though I find IBSGroup more relevant for me.

#17 Arnie W

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 07:29 AM

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I am so glad that this subject has been raised, as I was going to start a similar thread myself.Gilly, you will be interested to know that I went to a launch of The IBS Low-Starch Diet, by Carol Sinclair, two days ago. This is an excellent, thought-provoking book, which I have read and re-read. I have actually made reference to the book and the diet a few times on this forum over the last few weeks, with next to no response. Now the timing is right, and I hope that many people on this board consider it in their search for improvement for their symptoms.When I first read the book, I felt a very strong urge to contact the author, but couldn't find a way of doing so. A couple of weeks ago I just happened to notice an advert for Carol Sinclair's book launch. She is a New Zealander who was visiting here, but I understand now lives in England. There was no way I could miss meeting her, despite a fairly long, arduous journey by public transport way oner the other side of town. The purpose of my trip was not just to ask her a couple of personal questions relating to the diet, but also to invite her to participate on this site, because the description of many posters' symptoms fit in so much with the symptoms which Carol USED to have (pain from IBS and AS) and I felt that her diet would be such a blessing for many people. I can't understand why there was so little interest in my previous posts, but I hope that some ears prick up this time.What is interesting is Carol's explanation of the link between AS/IBS and the HLA B-27 gene. A blood test will reveal whether you have this gene, and if so, you will probably have elevated levels of Klebsiella bacteria, which thrive on the starch.Carol said that she would email me when she returns home and I'm sure she will oblige with sharing with us and answering questions when I give her the link to the site.In this book, Carol informs how to test for starch and methods of eliminating it. Some people will not have to give up all forms of starch, but others might be affected by something as simple as the starch in their medication and supplements. So, be careful, Jan8. If you want to succeed, avoid cheating! There's no need for it if you follow Carol's advice, and the book makes clear what food you can eat.For now, avoid bread, cakes, potatoes and pasta. Consider avoiding root veggies and all grains - rice might be ok for some.Salad veggies seem ok and most fruit, apparently not bananas. Meat is fine. You're allowed alcohol and chocolate, but that mightn't be for everyone. Maybe wait until further down the track.BTW, there is a large selection of starch-free recipes. I visited the AS site after first reading the book, gilly. It is helpful, though I find IBSGroup more relevant for me.

#18 Jan8

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 07:40 AM

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So much wonderful information. You know I think even at this early stage bright sun shine is at the end of the tunnel. This is the best I've felt for years. Daiysp, I to have done the grain free (wheat free) along with sugar free, coffee free, dairy free and many combinations of these and others to no avail. But this starch free seems to be the answer for me. I eat a lot of fruit and have ever felt it a problem apart from the bananas. Gilly, I've have spent hours looking at kickas site, thank you so much for the address. Lots of menu ideas which will be very helpful. Keep your fingers crossed for me.Jan8

#19 Jan8

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 07:40 AM

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So much wonderful information. You know I think even at this early stage bright sun shine is at the end of the tunnel. This is the best I've felt for years. Daiysp, I to have done the grain free (wheat free) along with sugar free, coffee free, dairy free and many combinations of these and others to no avail. But this starch free seems to be the answer for me. I eat a lot of fruit and have ever felt it a problem apart from the bananas. Gilly, I've have spent hours looking at kickas site, thank you so much for the address. Lots of menu ideas which will be very helpful. Keep your fingers crossed for me.Jan8

#20 Jan8

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 09:30 AM

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Arnie, I had heard of Carols book infact thats what triggered my interest. Do know I shouldn't cheat though it is difficult to avoid some forms and am a bit week willed. Now I'm armed with more food ideas (I love food) I should be better, thank goodness wine is not banded being starch free. Posted Image Must get a copy of Carols book, see its available on line. All very interesting and with luck very very helpful.Jan8





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