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10 yr old with blood in stool - lease help


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#1 michelle8

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Posted 25 January 2002 - 03:47 PM

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My normally healthy and happy 10 yar old daughter infomed me yesterday afternoon that after she went poop and wiped she had blood on her toilet paper and she said there was like a drop of blood in the water of the toilet. She has never had this happen before and of course she is too modest to let me see it, but like I said this is the first time it has happened. She says she strains to get it out but not because it is hard, but because she just wants to it over with. She has no itching, no burning, no pain at all. Could a 10 year old have like an anal tear or fissure or something from maybe either straining or eating something bad? Please help. I know I have to do something if it happens again, but maybe somebody else has heard of this. I'm sure it is nothing, but I wanted to check.


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#2 LauraRN

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Posted 26 January 2002 - 12:01 PM

Michelle,If your daughter is straining, then she may have a little tear. You may want to advise her to not strain as this could cause hemorrhoids and fissures. Also, make sure she knows you need to see it the next time it happens. If the blood is bright red, then you probably don't have to worry too much, just teach her good "toilet behaviour." Is it possible she is starting her period? I know it's a long shot, just wondering. Good luck,Laura

#3 eric

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Posted 27 January 2002 - 07:15 PM

michelle8 , Blood is a red flag that something is wrong, however for the most part its hemmies or something and if its brite red and there is only a little, its usally just that, however if it continues for more then a day you want to have it checked out by your doctor.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#4 AMcCall

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Posted 27 January 2002 - 10:26 PM

I just wanted to add my 2 cents worth here if I could. It could very well be a hem. (sorry to abbreviate, but I can never spell that word, LOL Posted Image ), because I have those, and they do cause bleeding. But it could also be something else. I don't mean to alarm you or anything, but I was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis when I was 10 years old. (I've had it for 19 years now.) I know that a lot of people think that's kinda young for UC, but these sort of problems run in my family, so I guess I was just in line for it?? (Did that make sense?) Even though it might be embarrassing for your daughter, it might be a good idea for you just to check after she goes to the bathroom. That way you might get a better idea of how much bleeding there is, and if you feel it's anything that warrants a doctor's visit. When I was a little girl, my Mom always had to check after I went so that she would know what to tell the doctor. It was embarrassing, but I sort of got used to it after a while. It would be a lot easier for you to describe things to a doctor than it would be for your daughter to, and in order for you to be able to tell him her symptoms, you might have to check. Best of luck, and I hope your little one feels better soon Posted Image





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