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Sour Aftertaste when eating chocolate or....


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#1 A1966

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Posted 01 January 2001 - 09:18 PM

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I don't know if it's a digestion thing or yeast thing or what, but when I eat chocolate or drink soda I get this sour aftertaste further back on my tongue, I just don't know what could be causing the aftertaste, I know it's something but what? I know there are people who don't get that when eating/drinking sugary stuff, so I know there's something wrong. Is there something to take for that?


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#2 Kathleen M.

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Posted 01 January 2001 - 10:17 PM

Different tastes occur on different parts of your tongue, and bitter is usually at the far back. I can't remember where sour is, but I know sweet is at the tip, so sour would have to be further back. So a sour or bitter aftertaste would only be able to occur somewhere other than the tip of the tongue.Aftertaste may be from the bacteria in your mouth using the sugar and producing acids, which usually have a sour or bitter taste.That's all I can come up with.Some aftertastes can come from compounds volitilizing into the air in the lungs and you exhale them (garlic is good at this and I know certain poisons make the breath smell distinctive from this type of outgassing). But I can't think (admittedly off the top of my head) of what would happen to sugar to do this. Artifical sugars on the otherhand often leave a bitter aftertaste in the mouth when they activate those taste buds when you swallow.One thing to test is brush your teeth with baking soda or rinse the mouth with salt water after your next soda or chocolate (I want to avoid for this test using something that may have sugar-substitues in it that may be a source of bitter aftertaste in some people). See if that resolves the problem. If it does, then it is probably mouth bacteria. You may want to also brush the tongue for this test as they can live in the nooks and crannies there too.K.
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#3 A1966

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Posted 01 January 2001 - 10:29 PM

I forgot to mention the white looking stuff on the tongue that is there, might be called thrush or something, what would the white coating be a result of? Haven't done a lot of searching on this. Thanks though,A

#4 Kathleen M.

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Posted 01 January 2001 - 11:38 PM

Usually a white coating doesn't mean anything, and everyone has that from time to time. Most of the time (from what I understand) it's from the normal bacteria in the mouth. If brushing your tongue on a semi-regular basis clears it up it probably isn't thrush.Thrush (at least when I had it) was white, but looked very different from the occasional "normal" white coating I get. I had a female yeast infection at the time from antibiotics and got cross contaminated. (They are right when they say you should wash your hands after using the rest room ) It had an appearance that was much thicker (when it is down there the usual description is cottage cheese like) and I had some large very white areas at the back of the tongue. The "normal" white coating is usually more of an all over thing.Thrush (usually) can be cleared up pretty easily with medication. If you think it is thrush, go to the doctor. They can help you. After a day or two it was gone when I got medication for it, and it's never been back. (even though I've had an occasional yeast infection down there)K.
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#5 Kathleen M.

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Posted 01 January 2001 - 11:47 PM

See these: http://www.parentsoup.com/experts/leche/111797G.html http://www.allhealth.com/childrens/qa/0,48..._122259,00.html http://www.drkoop.com/conditions/ency/article/000966.htm
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#6 SteveE

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Posted 02 January 2001 - 12:16 PM

I had (and on rare occasions still have) the same problem. Here's what happened that may have something to do with why the problem is better now:I learned that Sodium Laurel Sulfate (and some similar substances) found in most toothpastes can cause canker sores. When I switched to Rembrandt's SLS-free toothpaste for the prevention of canker sores, not only did the sores cease, but that sour aftertaste became much less common. I also started using Listerine around that time to follow-up brushing. I believe that this combo has made a healthier mouth for me.I used to think that the stuff & sour taste on my tongue might be related to my IBS too, but after further review...I don't think so anymore.One other point, though. You mentioned it occurring after chocolate....I don't personally recommend chocolate for an IBS sufferer. I broke my own rule about that and had two pieces yesterday. Today I'm paying a small price for that...

#7 A1966

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Posted 02 January 2001 - 07:34 PM

Since I have been researching IBS for only a short time, I don't think I have it, I know more about it now from other people's messages, and I don't have the same situations, D or C every day, now I now the only problem I have is gas, and those embarrassing noises in the intestines, every single day, it started up in 8th grade, so I know this problem came from somewhere but don't know where. Thanks for your input, I'll have to check the toothpaste I use and see whats in it.

#8 Kathleen M.

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Posted 02 January 2001 - 08:59 PM

You don't have to have C or D *every* day to have IBS. IBS is pretty much diagnosed (defined as) when there is pain and/or discomfort (urgency counts here) that is associated with changes in bowel frequency or stool consistancy (does not need to be all out D or C just a change in frequency or consistancy) or pain or discomfort that goes away after having a Bowel movement (or could be in some cases a good fart).Some people have daily symptoms, some people have infrequent symptoms. FWIW generally the people who end up in support groups (for most every disorder) tend to represent the most severe end of the spectrum.I know that there was an investigator looking into whether noises were different in IBSers and non-IBSers, but all I ever saw was a report of some preliminary work (which seemed to indicate that it might be). Don't know if it ever really panned out.Gas can only come from two places. The bacteria in your gut make it (maybe you got colonized by a high gas producing kind back then), or your taking it in from the outside (which seems to be mostly a burping thing, some people don't believe in it, and some people hold out that it is possible in some cases).Things to try.1. Simethecone2. Input different bacteria (probiotic therapy)3. Don't feed the bacteria you've got (dietary changes like only eating rice starch and avoiding lactose and raffinose (beans, cabbage))K.
My story of beating IBS: My Story with IBS
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