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fructose malabsorption


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#1 Pammy

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 04:47 PM

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After suffering for years with intermittant bouts of abdominal spasms and cramping and rushing to find bathrooms, I was just diagnosed with fructose malabsorption. I was also diagnosed with lactose intolerance many years ago. I had a colonoscopy three weeks ago which proved normal and tomorrow I am having an abdominal ct scan. I am not totally certain I have a fructose malabsorption, and I was wondering if anyone else has been diagnosed with this condition and what their symptoms were. Thanks so much for any replies, as I am pretty desperate to find an answer.[


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#2 shimo

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 10:16 PM

Hi Pammy,Welcome to the board :(I personally believe that it can be an option. I didn't get any diagnosis and I did cut fructose out of my diet to see the results. I did cut it 2 days ago (too soon to see results).I am on a water-only plan now. Fructose is found on almost every soft drink.For example, Lipton even states that on their site.http://www.lipton.co...d/org_sweet.aspIngredients:Brewed tea from LIPTONŽ tea leaves, high fructose corn syrup, citric acid (provides tartness) and caramel color.Fructose and Citric Acid aren't particularly good for a "nervous" digestive system. There is a very good percentage of people with IBS that are Fructose/Lactose Intolerant. (I actually think I'm one of them)Usually if you're Fructose Intolerant, you're also Lactose Intolerant. So it does make sense.This does not mean that your symptoms will disappear 100% if you really have IBS, however you should notice good improvements if you cut it out. (especially if you have IBS-D)Here's a good article for you to read about Fructose and IBS:http://www.drmirkin....ealth/3018.htmlI'm concerned about Fructose myself, and I did research a lot on the subject.Apparently, some people can even fully recover from Fructose Malabsorption if they just cut it for a few months.Basically, Fructose Malabsorption means that your body does not have enough Fructase do digest Fructose (pretty much like Lactose vs Lactase, which is the enzyme used to break down Lactose). If you prefer not to cut it, you can take Fructase Enzymes with every meal just to check how your body reacts to it.Just to give you even more info, some researchers believe that high-fructose diets are the cause of obesity in many people. Food/Soft Drink manufacturers just use it because it's cheaper for them.So believe me, that is something you won't regret to take off of your system :)You'll still find fructose in fruits (melon has tons of it for example, that's why it tastes so sweet), but well... you won't be surrounded by it - you'll probably be glad to have done it when you're 60 or 70, trust me :)I wish you the best of luck, and make sure to keep us posted, especially me -_-

#3 Lee

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:16 PM

Pammy,I was diagnosed with fructose malabsorption 10 years ago. My two teenage daughters have it too. Symptoms being abdominal cramping, gas, and constipation. Some people get D. I also have IBS of course. I have seen a Dietitian who advised the following: Fructose is a simple sugar which means it is already broken down to its smallest size. It cannot be broken down any more. So we are not lacking an enzyme. As far as I know, no enzyme exists on the market for this. Lactose intolerance does involve a missing enzyme. There is a problem with the "transporter". The process of transporting the molecules across the bowel wall into the bloodstream. So it stays in the bowel and produces hydrogen or methane gas. Hence the pain and gassiness. Some gas passes into the blood and gets carried to the lungs. That is why it shows on the breath test. Sucrose (table sugar) is made up of two simple sugars. That is glucose (dextrose) and fructose. However, the glucose molecules give the fructose molecules a piggy back across the bowel wall. So glucose helps you to absorb the fructose and have less symptoms. Table sugar, in moderation is therefore OK. Also, you can sprinkle glucose powder (dextrose) on some strawberries and this helps you to digest the fructose in the fruit. Glucose powder has a lot of kilojoules so you wouldn't do this too often.Some foods are pure fructose like honey and should be avoided. Others need to be avoided because they have more fructose than glucose, for eg. apples, pears and mangos. And many fruits have more glucose than fructose and so can be enjoyed in moderation. Onions, leeks etc are some vegetables that can be a problem. A dietitian can give you a list.Also, wheat in large amounts should be avoided because it is made up of many fructose molecules called fructans. So gluten free products are suitable. Not because you need to avoid gluten, but because they don't contain wheat. Wheat as an ingredient in small amounts is OK.Hope this helps.

#4 Lee

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:29 PM

Shimo,My Dietitian told me that fructose is a single sugar, so it can't be broken down any further (unlike lactose). So an enzyme isn't needed. She said the problem is with the "transporter" to take it across the bowel wall. However, as you stated, lactose intolerance means you are missing the enzyme lactase.As far as I know, there isn't a tablet on the market to help with fructose malabsorption. I wish there was.

#5 lovecolours

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 08:31 PM

Hi how would I be able to check what food contains fructose, like in meat or veges or sauces?I often take half the papaya daily or prune juice because I constipate, do they contain fructose too? :(

#6 salsamundo

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Posted 31 October 2007 - 03:58 PM

I was wondering if anyone might offer some creative cooking solutions for fructose-free dieting. I am new to this and I am having trouble thinking of things. I´m eating plain yoghurt, rice cakes, rice, potatoes, meat, fish, poultry, permitted vegetables, nuts, and milk. Is this what everyone eats or am I missing out on other allowed foods? Any creative combos? Thanks for your help!!!

#7 Lee

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 01:17 AM

I live in Australia, so I hope these suggestions are not too different to what you would eat. Gluten free products (because they do not contain wheat) are good. For eg. gluten free pasta, and GF bread from the supermarket or health food shop. Any products that are suitable for people with Coeliac Disease are handy.Snacks are hard to think of but what you are eating is similar to me. Rice crackers and tzatziki dip or hommis dip is nice.I eat rice puffs and yoghurt (with a couple of strawberries sprinkled with dextrose) on top, for breakfast or I eat porridge. Cornflakes are ok too. I use GF bread for toast.I use Gluten Free bread for lunch and make a salad sandwich eg. avacado, lettuce, cheese, ham or chicken and a small bit of grated carrot. The GF bread is nicer if warmed in the microwave ( and stored in the freezer and defrosted as needed). Sometimes, if I am at home, I make a toasted sandwich with ham and cheese.Sushi is nice for lunch on the run, if you like that kind of thing and you have a shop nearby.As for dinner, I sometimes make a stir fry (fresh 'allowed' vegetables- carrot, snow peas, mushrooms, bok choy) and chicken, lamb or beef strips served with rice. Some stir fry sachets from the supermarket (that you mix with water) are used. Check ingredients as some contain onion and are best avoided. I have found a few that I stick to or I use the sauces. Where I live we have a very multi-cultural community and Asian food is prominent in the supermarkets. It is easy to prepare and you know what is going into your meals.Beef stroganoff, spaghetti with mince beef ( I make my bolognaise sauce with tomato soup instead of real tomato puree. It tastes fine).We have mexican wraps (burritoes) using the same sachets mentioned above, and meat strips. Also, lettuce, grated carrot, grated cheese etc.Check out any recipe books for Coeliacs. You may need to adjust or substitute some ingredients for fructose friendly ones.Hope this helps.

#8 Kathleen M.

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 08:01 AM

We have had a few diagnosed with that.Fortunately dietary changes tend to make the sympotms much better.You might have both IBS and sugar issues. I don't know about fructose, but I know some with lactose intolerance are asymptomatic (that is they handle the extra gas in ways they do not notice).IBSers often have problems even with fairly normal levels of gas so an IBSer with these sugar intolerances may have the IBS triggered by the sugars. Diet should help a lot, but may not make the IBS go completely away.Intolerance to any of the sugars is not the same as IBS, but there can be symptom overlap. If the diet change alone makes all the symptoms go away than all you had was the sugar intolerance.K.
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#9 anne71

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 11:12 PM

I have a friend who is a pediatric GI specialist and she has suggested that I check for fructose malaborption. According to her, it is a fairly simple test. You drink a solution, wait a while, and then blow in a tube or something. I don't know the cost, but at least it isn't an invasive test. I asked my doctor about it, and she said I didn't need the test...But there is a test for it, so get the test if you can.

#10 Guest_Newtoitall_*

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 08:48 PM

I live in Australia, so I hope these suggestions are not too different to what you would eat. Gluten free products (because they do not contain wheat) are good. For eg. gluten free pasta, and GF bread from the supermarket or health food shop. Any products that are suitable for people with Coeliac Disease are handy.Snacks are hard to think of but what you are eating is similar to me. Rice crackers and tzatziki dip or hommis dip is nice.I eat rice puffs and yoghurt (with a couple of strawberries sprinkled with dextrose) on top, for breakfast or I eat porridge. Cornflakes are ok too. I use GF bread for toast.I use Gluten Free bread for lunch and make a salad sandwich eg. avacado, lettuce, cheese, ham or chicken and a small bit of grated carrot. The GF bread is nicer if warmed in the microwave ( and stored in the freezer and defrosted as needed). Sometimes, if I am at home, I make a toasted sandwich with ham and cheese.Sushi is nice for lunch on the run, if you like that kind of thing and you have a shop nearby.As for dinner, I sometimes make a stir fry (fresh 'allowed' vegetables- carrot, snow peas, mushrooms, bok choy) and chicken, lamb or beef strips served with rice. Some stir fry sachets from the supermarket (that you mix with water) are used. Check ingredients as some contain onion and are best avoided. I have found a few that I stick to or I use the sauces. Where I live we have a very multi-cultural community and Asian food is prominent in the supermarkets. It is easy to prepare and you know what is going into your meals.Beef stroganoff, spaghetti with mince beef ( I make my bolognaise sauce with tomato soup instead of real tomato puree. It tastes fine).We have mexican wraps (burritoes) using the same sachets mentioned above, and meat strips. Also, lettuce, grated carrot, grated cheese etc.Check out any recipe books for Coeliacs. You may need to adjust or substitute some ingredients for fructose friendly ones.Hope this helps.wait.. "Beef stroganoff, spaghetti with mince beef ( I make my bolognaise sauce with tomato soup instead of real tomato puree. It tastes fine)." I thought tomato anything was off limits for ppl with FM? cause I used to love spaghetti... but no sauce atm.



#11 andi smith

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 09:22 PM

Hi. My GI has ordered a hydrogen breath test in three days. The test is to see if I have a fructose malabsorption! I've been suffering from IBS-PI for a year now and he thinks its time to start thinking out of the box for possible other causes for my pain. He told me to go off of fructose for the time being( a full week) and see if it helps. Nothing yet has changed. My family thought it a good idea to load up on as much junk as possible and see what happens. I never did eat anything, but it got me thinking. If I do have a fructose problem something should happen. So maybe you could try your own "test". Just make sure you don't take to much fructose in, just in case ur symptoms get a lot worse. I have no idea what the hydrogen breath test costs, I go to a childrens hospital and our insurance covers the test.Hope I this helps. :) ask if u have questions about the test. I will be getting in 3 days. Hopefully I can give you some info about it.:)

#12 fructoseandme

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 02:25 AM

Hi everyone,I was diagnosed with Fructose Malabsorption last year, and I have now made a website at www.fructoseandme.comI got so sick of trawling the internet for information and hardly finding any - that I decided to make my own website. I have information on what FM is, restaurants to visit and a section on recipes (that I hope other people will help me fill up!!).Please check it out if you are interested - I really want everyone to work together to make this a one-stop spot for Fructose Malabsorbers! Kate :-)

#13 CK-fructose

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 10:28 AM

I currently have a fructose malabsorption diagnosis and have been trying to lose weight? I excerise more speradically than regularly and am working on getting to a better schedule but I find my eatting habits are the hardest challenge. I find myself not eatting enough fruits or veggies, especially salad which bothers me the most of anything. I am so frustrated I can hardly think of things besides the basic meat, fish, rice and potatoes my doctor suggested. I happen to be his first patient with the diagnosis since he has a much older population he serves, I am only 25 about 25yrs younger than most people in his waiting room. I have bought a book but it isn't written by a health professional and is more of a self story of what worked for the author, some of which has helped but it seems mine is more sensitive. I read over a few posts and thought they were helpful, especially how the test works I was so confused and thought it was an enzyme since its the same kind of test for lactose intolerance. I want to also start a family soon and am wonder the chance of complications with my bowels during pregnancy and the nutrients for the baby, and the chance of them developing the worse hereditary fructose malabsorption which is much more extreme than dietary from what I have read. Thanks for allowing me to share. -Caroline, NJ

#14 Kathleen M.

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 11:00 AM

Fructose is a transport problem rather than an enzyme problem like with lactose intolerance.In either case (don't break it down so it doesn't get absorbed, or don't have enough of the transporter to get it out of the small intestine) you end up with extra fermentable stuff in the colon which causes symptoms of lactose or fructose intolerances.It is possible to have IBS AND and intolerance, and things like salad are hard on IBSers, they do better with cooked veggies.I don't think the localized transport problem evolves into the systemic problem, so if that isn't in your family I wouldn't think you'd have to worry about that.
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#15 hopefloats

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 06:13 PM

After suffering for years with intermittant bouts of abdominal spasms and cramping and rushing to find bathrooms, I was just diagnosed with FM (fructose malabsorption). I was also diagnosed with lactose intolerance many years ago. I had a colonoscopy three weeks ago which proved normal and tomorrow I am having an abdominal ct scan. I am not totally certain I have a fructose malabsorption, and I was wondering if anyone else has been diagnosed with this condition and what their symptoms were. Thanks so much for any replies, as I am pretty desperate to find an answer.[

Hello PammyWhere you diagnosed with Fructose Malabsorption after having a Hydrogen Breath Test? I received that diagnosis after my test last summer. I am eliminating FODMAPs and feeling better. Research FODMAP Diet for FM and you'll find basic information that will be helpful. It is a very restrictive diet, but restricting FODMAPs is the key to relieving symptoms. My symptoms are gas, belching, stomach rumbling, spasms, pain, bloating, stomach distention and chronic diarrhea with urgency. If I go off the diet these symptoms come back full force.I was also diagnosed with SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) also with a breath test. I was treated with Rifaximin 550mg TID for 2 weeks with great success. I have been feeling better and can be symptom free as long as I stay true to eliminating FODMAPs. There is information here on this site about safe foods, and foods that must be eliminated to get you started on the right path. Best of luck to you and others here.

#16 doveljw

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 02:48 AM

Hello PammyWhere you diagnosed with Fructose Malabsorption after having a Hydrogen Breath Test? I received that diagnosis after my test last summer. I am eliminating FODMAPs and feeling better. Research FODMAP Diet for FM and you'll find basic information that will be helpful. It is a very restrictive diet, but restricting FODMAPs is the key to relieving symptoms. My symptoms are gas, belching, stomach rumbling, spasms, pain, bloating, stomach distention and chronic diarrhea with urgency. If I go off the diet these symptoms come back full force.I was also diagnosed with SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) also with a breath test. I was treated with Rifaximin 550mg TID for 2 weeks with great success. I have been feeling better and can be symptom free as long as I stay true to eliminating FODMAPs. There is information here on this site about safe foods, and foods that must be eliminated to get you started on the right path. Best of luck to you and others here.

Can i ask how long you had symptoms before you started the low FODMAP diet and how long were you on the diet before you felt significant change? Also, how is one diagnosed with SIBO? The reason i ask is b/c i have the same symptoms as you except no chronic diarrhea. I don't have insurance and i have already had lots of blood work done and ultrasound. Nothing really out of place according to those test, and i want to convince my GI doctor to have a Hydrogen Breath Test done and a treatment of antibiotics. I figure those two things aren't that expensive and if they lead to more understanding and/or help then great if not at least i tried something before going broke or waiting forever to get invasive diagnostics done.Thanks for the advice.

#17 askmom

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 09:39 AM

Interesting. How did they diagnose you, Pammy? Is it just through the breath test? Also, I'm having colonoscopy in two weeks and terrified. Did you do well with prep, etc.?I hope you find that you feel better cutting out the fructose. It can only help!

#18 FructMal Mama

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 02:10 PM

Hi everyone,I was diagnosed with Fructose Malabsorption last year, and I have now made a website at www.fructoseandme.comI got so sick of trawling the internet for information and hardly finding any - that I decided to make my own website. I have information on what FM is, restaurants to visit and a section on recipes (that I hope other people will help me fill up!!).Please check it out if you are interested - I really want everyone to work together to make this a one-stop spot for Fructose Malabsorbers! Kate :-)

Hi guys,I just wanted to add a few links to Fructose Malabsorption support groups on Facebook. They have been a great resource for me and my daughter. I started one for Parents of FructMal Kids (USA) - http://www.facebook....1908131094/Here are two others that are more aimed for adults with FM...many of the members are Australian, but there are quite a few members from the US as well: http://www.facebook....uctosefriendly/ and http://www.facebook....groups/FMSGVIC/

#19 KJL

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:24 AM

Interesting information here, thank you everyone who has posted.I am waiting on a referral appointment and will definitely ask about FM. I have the same symptoms as mentioned here, except I am C not D.Doctor had told me that any allergy or intolerance to food would be D, not C. But I see so much literature saying it can be both, that I think he might be mistaken.Then again I have seen many doctors over the last 10 years and most of them say different things about IBS!





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