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male tech doing transvaginal ultrasound


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#1 Cigarello

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:19 PM

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Today i was scheduled for a pelvic/transvaginal ultrasound; a male tech was going to do this procedure and i couldn't believe it; i left the hospital and scheduled the procedure at another hospital in the area and asked for a female tech. I live in Michigan and I had transvag. US for 20 years and only by female techs. Here in Florida it is a whole other story; i really can't believe any woman would allow a male tech to do this study and secondly, there is a liability issue. Your thoughts are appreciated.


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#2 Ashers86

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 10:50 PM

Well, I don't see a problem with this (I was uncomfortable seeing a male gynecologist, but that's all I have available...), but if you specifically requested a female tech, then I'd raise a issue with whoever was responsible for booking it.But then again, I don't know... I know that you really don't have a choice sometimes depending on who's working...
IBS-D since October 2006; officially diagnosed with IBS in November 2006. Switch to C in May - December 2008 caused by anti-depressants.
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#3 overitnow

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 02:01 AM

My vasectomy was performed by my woman doctor in her office many years ago. My current doctor is a woman. I guess it is a matter of comfort.Mark
My story of beating IBS and my other chronic conditions: http://www.ibsgroup....total-wellness/

#4 Cigarello

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 09:07 AM

well I think it is different with a physician versus a "tech"; ( same thing applies to a man with a female physician); it is a physician vs a tech. as women we are conditioned to have vag exams our whole lives and mostly by male docs; that is different than having a test like a transvag ultrasound by a male "tech": as I said in all of my years having this test in Michigan I have never had a male tech or even seen one do this procedure; it just kinda creeped me out; but that is just me.

#5 salbur

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 08:02 AM

here in the u.k it is considered best practice for a male examining a female to have a female nurse or medical professional present. personally i wouldn't of been happy with the situation you found yourself in, and would of done the same thing.

#6 TheInvisableGirl

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 05:33 AM

O lordy i would have DIED! I had to have one done last year and doing it at all was humilating i couldnt imagine having a male tech..... ugh just the thought. I had my first gyno exam by a guy but hell he did my grandma's and moms so how bad could mine be lol. But yeah putting anything besides a speculum in there no no for men outside of sex. XOXONatalia

#7 baz22p

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 06:54 AM

I can appreciate the 'comfort' issue, but lets not forget that some of the top IVF/AI doctors, and midwives, are men (there are as many good females probably, but surely the biggest point here is the professionalism of whoever does it). The training is the same regardless of gender. My endoscopy, and barium enema, were both conducted by women. If you were in a very serious accident, and had the misfortune to be unconscious, would you only want to be examined and treated by a female doctor? Do you carry a card requesting this should it happen?Baz :(

#8 leeballz

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 10:47 AM

Hey I'm with you on this one. I actually just got my first pelvic ultra sound yesterday, and when she told me she was then going to put the camera down there it caught me off guard! I guess no one warned me about that part :( It was fine but if it had been a male doctor I would have immediately gotten up and left. I'm sorry but I think when it comes to a female body the best person to know what's going on is another female. I understand that a male doctor may have a lot of experience and training, but he still has never had to experience a gynocological exam himself. Maybe I'm a little self-conscious too but I don't care, that's how I feel about it!-Leeann

#9 Cathy in CA

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 07:45 PM

OK, you are all going to GASP when you read this!When I first started the job, I was sort of horrified, then amazed that it did not seem to bother the patients as I had expected.So I was reminded of what I already knew. Professionalism has a huge impact on acceptance. Are you ready?... There are male Sexual Assault Examiners checking for injuries and collecting evidence for rape kits! I've been off work for a year due to Rheumatoid Arthritis, IBS, 2 shoulder surgeries, but I've been a nurse since 1968. In my last 10 years, I worked in the specialty of Forensic Nursing, in the subspecialty of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner. One of the most experienced Examiners in our county, on our team, is a male Nurse Practioner who works in our public health clinic where he examines all people, all ages. When a SART team was set up, I was on the new team of nurse examiners for adult victims and he was one of our experienced teachers. We learned a lot from him by observing his techniques and manner with the traumatized mostly-women. Since our new group took over adult exams, our teachers devoted themselves to the important work of children's exams. Granted, he is never ever alone with the patient. There is always a female nurse, the patient is allowed a family member or friend if she wants, and she is always offered a counselor from our local rape crisis center to be in attendance. Our detectives call for that before they even call the Examiner and always wait to begin the whole process until the counselor arrives. She and I usually got there at the same time. There are female detectives, but not many, so most are men, dressed in street clothes and fully armed with loads of trainings on how to effectively yet compassionately interview a trauma victim -always impressive to watch, at least in my county. After the interview is done, the detective goes away to lead his team to catch the bad guy and that's when the so called "rape exam" is started. It's actually for any sexual assault, not just for rape itself. It takes about an hour unless there are many physical injuries to photograph. The actual genital exam is only a small portion of that and done at the end, when she feels more comfortable with us and the process. Yes, there are photographs there too, but so magnified, only a trained medical eye can make any sense of it. It is to show whether or not there are injuries (which by the way, heal quickly). So, that was the case with this male examiner when I observed and assisted him. His calm demeaner, obvious knowledge and experience, and basic professionalism calmed them. I learned from him, and my own common sense of decency, to always ask permission to do anything, touch any part of her body and of course, she is always covered, except for the location being examined ie an arm or neck. They never objected to him doing this... ever. Of course, there were us 2 women and often a sister or friend. And our locked suite for this purpose, next to emergency room with a guard out front of it, helps to make her feel safe. That relief and the familiarity of a hospital and nurses, usually helps calm them.So, the point of this whole lesson is to show you that even rape victims are ok with a male medical professional performing a highly trained procedure on embarrassing parts of their bodies. I remembered that when my woman gastroenterologist had the nerve to leave me to go have a baby! She extended her leave so I had to go with one of the other docs, all men. I thought, hey, why not... if rape victims can do it, so can I. I think my new guy is great. He really listens to me, has repeated all tests done only 2 years ago and is trying new treatments I was never put on before ie Cholestyramine (questran). Now, I feel really kind of ashamed I was so adamant about having a female GIdoc before. I really don't know why I did that. When I was young all I had were male docs, for OB/GYN, GI, Urology, etc..... but I did always make sure a woman was in the room too. By the way, I did examine male victims of rape too. I was focused on the job yet compassionate and respectful, and professional. Those patients were probably embarrassed, but were calm and accepting and it always went well, just like with the women. Does this help anybody feel any better or at least prepared how to deal with a male medical professional doing a gyn procedure?Cathy

#10 BQ

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 11:12 PM

Somehow I think the sensitivity training that a Sexual Assault Examiner gets is no where near what is available or done for Male Med techs...So ladies word to the wise... if you are having to have a US or a transvaginal US and you are uncomfortable with a male tech performing it.. say so when you call to make your appointment. Simply request to have the appointment when a female tech is available and WITH a female tech.This is simply one of those things that is individual. Some women will be fine with a male tech and some others won't be. And that's ok.I've told my daughter whichever she prefers is fine and her choice to make. (she's 14) And I think because I didn't make a big deal about it... she doesn't care whether the Doc or tech is male or female. And she has to have echo's done every once in awhile. But really it IS a choice for everyone with a tech appt and a US.(For me?? I have had two male OB/GYN's and 1 female midwife. At the birth of my first born.. I had a total of 2 Male Docs, the one female midwife and even a "student" male nurse as well as two female nurses. I was wondering if there was anyone else left on the floor that wasn't in there! My poor hub was squeezed in up by me. But..I didn't give a hoot. Things weren't going too well and I felt like 'bring anyone in here that can help!" LOL And.. really they all did play a role that day and did help and I have one very big, healthy, wonderful, soon to be 18 yr old, son because of them.) Thanks for letting us know of the fine & excellent training that you all received there Cathy. And boy if I'm ever needing a rape kit done, I hope I get a Sexual Assault Response team like yours.All the bestBQ
Please remember this is a group of folks seeking support on how to live with and manage IBS. THESE ARE ONLY MY OWN THOUGHTS. IF YOU WANT AN EXPERT OPINION, ASK A MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL.

#11 Cathy in CA

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 02:29 AM

Thanks. The one thing I should have said emphatically, like you did, was that as a patient, we always have the right to refuse... any part of anything.It's important for the patient to speak up and for the health professional to be sensitve. Sometimes, it really matters and is obvious as to why, like wanting a female tech. That's usually an easy fix, even if need to reschedule for another day. Interestingly, other times, patients simply need to feel they have control of something-anything in an uncontrollable situation. If possible, it should be honored, otherwise, an alternative can be offered to give back that feeling of power. A silly example would be refusing alcohol swipe before blood draw... betadine could be substituted, still cleansing skin. A patient can always request a change, if it's truly important like not wearing street clothes in a sterile operating room, explanations help, and giving the patient a choice of hospital gown colors or something to give her that sense of control. This is good to remember for our elderly too. Sorry, I'm tired and rambling.Just remember: we have the right to ask for what we want.... for it, we might need to make appt for another day or another place... we are our own advocates. Cathy

#12 angie37

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 01:28 PM

I have had fibroids and other issues the last few years, usually I've gone with female docs also, as my very first exam as a teenager with a male gyno did not go well at all. He was rough, didnt tell me what he was doing or why, and I was scared. And, when the nurse offered to hold my hand he barked at her that she couldn't as he needed her help. Not good:( That turned me off to male docs for a long long time. 2 years ago, though, I needed to get some symptoms addressed and the doc. recomnnended to me turned out to be male- and I LOVE him!! He's great, excellent bedside manner, listened to all my concerns and explained everything and wanted to help me find some relief. Their ultrasound tech is a male, but they always bring a female nurse into the room when he does an exam, so I felt very comfortable and I have to say he is one of the best. He explained everything to me and even pointed out all my 'parts' as he went along. Very cool! So all that to say, it has changed my mind about male doctors and techs. There ARE a lot of good ones out there who are professional and will make you feel very comfortable, even during an embarassing exam!

#13 Tiss

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 07:54 PM

This is such a personal issue and one that I find I feel differently about from doctor to doctor and year to year. I am 52 and have had some great female and male doctors. However the only two really horrible doctors I've had have been women---real haughty, nasty b**ches. I fired one of them and just left the other. I have a male gyn now and he is terrific. Now, to the techs, I don't know that I would mind a male tech as long as there was a female in the room and he was obviously professional. But, I would never get a mammogram from a man. And i don't think I've ever seen a male mammogram tech.
Tiss





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