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Current Poll: If you suffer from a chronic pain condition (IBS or other painful condition) how do you feel about your doctor's care?

Previous Polls:

Poll:  How long does it take you from the first sign of a flare to wellness and feeling good again?

 

Poll: Do you have a mood color which will help to predict your response to hypnotherapy for IBS?

 

Choose a color from the color wheel below that you believe represents your mood and record the color number.  Vote below.

 Vote here

Mood color choice helps to predict response to hypnotherapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

Carruthers HRMorris JTarrier NWhorwell PJ.

Department of Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Peter Whorwell

BACKGROUND: Approximately two thirds of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) respond well to hypnotherapy. However, it is time consuming as well as expensive to provide and therefore a way of predicting outcome would be extremely useful. The use of imagery and color form an integral part of the hypnotherapeutic process and we have hypothesised that investigating color and how it relates to mood might help to predict response to treatment. In order to undertake this study we have previously developed and validated a method of presenting colors to individuals for research purposes called the Manchester Color Wheel (MCW). Using this instrument we have been able to classify colors into positive, neutral and negative shades and this study aimed to assess their predictive role in hypnotherapy.

METHODS: 156 consecutive IBS patients (aged 14-74, mean 42.0 years, 127 (81%) females, 29 (19%) males) were studied. Before treatment, each patient was asked to relate their mood to a color on the MCW as well as completing the IBS Symptom Severity Score, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, the Non-colonic Symptom Scale, the Quality of Life Scale and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (TAS) which is a measure of hypnotisability. Following hypnotherapy all these measures were repeated with the exception of the TAS.

RESULTS: For patients with a positive mood color the odds of responding to hypnotherapy were nine times higher than that of those choosing either a neutral or negative color or no color at all (odds ratio: 8.889; p = 0.042). Furthermore, a high TAS score and the presence of HAD anxiety also had good predictive value (odds ratio: 4.024; p = 0.092, 3.917; p < 0.001 respectively) with these markers and a positive mood color being independent of each other. In addition, these factors could be combined to give an even stronger prediction of outcome. Twice as many responders (63, 77.8%) had a positive mood color or were anxious or had a high TAS score compared with 32 (42.7%) without these factors (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: A positive mood color, especially when combined with HAD anxiety and a high TAS score, predict a good response to hypnotherapy.

Study text: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3008688/

PMID: 21138549 [PubMed - in process]

Background: 

Recollection of childhood abdominal pain in adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders
Chitkara DK, Talley NJ, Schleck C, Zinsmeister AR, Shah ND, Locke GR 3rd.

UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Objective. It is hypothesized that adults who can recall abdominal pain as children are at risk of experiencing a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID), but this is not specific to any particular FGID. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between recollecting abdominal pain as a child and experiencing a FGID. Material and methods. A valid self-reported questionnaire of GI symptoms was mailed to a random population-based sample in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Logistic regression models adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), somatization, and other factors were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for having a FGID in individuals recalling bouts of stomach or abdominal pain in childhood (before age 15). Results. Overall, 2298 (55%) of a total of 4194 eligible adult subjects returned a completed questionnaire. Of the respondents, 213 (9%) recalled experiencing abdominal pain as children. Adults who recalled experiencing abdominal pain in childhood had greater odds for reporting symptoms of a FGID (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.7). Recalling abdominal pain in childhood was significantly associated with irritable bowel
syndrome (IBS) (OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.7-3.6) but not gastroesophageal reflux, dyspepsia, constipation, or diarrhea, adjusting for age, gender, BMI, somatic symptoms, marital status, and education. Conclusions. Recollection of childhood abdominal pain is specifically associated with IBS in adults. This suggests that a proportion of adults with IBS may have onset of symptoms of abdominal pain during childhood.

PMID: 19016078 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
 

Poll: Where do your poops rank on the Bristol stool scale?

The Bristol Stool Form Scale or Bristol Stool Chart is a seven group classification of the form that appears upon defecation of human feces. It was developed by Dr. K. Hering at the University of Bristol and was first published in the British Medical Journal in 1990. The form of the stool depends on the time it spends in the colon. Although not an exact science, the scale is used to help a physician recognize stool patterns for the purpose of diagnosiing digestive conditions.

 

Bristol Stool Form Scale