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Starting low FODMAP but hard time giving up wheat

wheat ibs-c gluten

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#1 BleuPhire

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 05:16 PM

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Hello, everyone! I have IBS-C with pain after almost everything I eat. Last year, I took a saliva test that showed I am gluten intolerant and have a long list of cross-reactives to go with it- rice, milk, oats, coffee, and more. I can supposedly have corn, soy, quinoa and any meat.

 

I went gfree for 4 months, very strict. I felt a lot better, but still had C and belly pain sometimes. I introduced it back slowly with no crazy symptoms for a while. They seemed to slowly creep back. I have been dairy free until starting the low F diet 2 weeks ago. I haven't been very strict but when I get belly pain, bread, etc. seems to make me feel better. Though I wonder if it is causing pain hours later or the next day. I don't bloat right after. I usually bloat and have the most pain after 5/6pm. Like adult colic!

 

How many of you find that wheat is a big problem? Or how much can you tolerate?

 

Thanks!



#2 Freud

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 05:48 PM

If you have gluten intolerance it's really important to stop eating wheat. You're hurting yourself if you don't. If the allergy is bad you're going to make yourself very sick. If you can not tolerate gluten but still eat food containing the substance, then the small intestinal mucosa may be damaged so it no longer can absorb nutrients properly. Try to find flour substitutes. My favourites are almond flour which you can make som amazing stuff from. Cakes and pancakes and bread. You could also use teff, but if your problem is IBS-C that's not to recommend since it will make you more constipated. There's also coconut flour, not one of my favourites but anyway. There should be more alternatives out there.

 

Today I don't eat any wheat or even flour substitutes since I've gotten used to another kind of diet. I rarely crave bread anymore. Had a sandwhich to try a couple of weeks ago and it tasted fine but I can very well live without it.

 

Wheat is often a problem for people with IBS.



#3 Shaylu

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 06:01 PM

There are so many GF versions out there. So no point in making yourself worse.

I have only been tested for coeliac and results were negative, but if I eat wheat I have symptoms within half an hour of eating.

Even if you think you can tolerate it, your insides will be showing the truth. Allow yourself to heal.

#4 BleuPhire

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 07:35 PM

Thanks for the replies. I forgot to add that my celiac test was negative, also. My b12 was low. Not sure about vitamin d, but I started taking good vitamins. I'm sure I should just do the FODMAP elimination diet, instead of just trying to cut most out. It was so hard cutting gluten out last year. It drove me and my family nuts. 



#5 rellybelly17

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 09:10 PM

I feel much better when I avoid it at all costs. Gluten free waffles are my favorite gluten free food so far :)


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#6 Freud

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 11:11 AM

Thanks for the replies. I forgot to add that my celiac test was negative, also. My b12 was low. Not sure about vitamin d, but I started taking good vitamins. I'm sure I should just do the FODMAP elimination diet, instead of just trying to cut most out. It was so hard cutting gluten out last year. It drove me and my family nuts. 

 

Have you tested for SIBO (Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth)? B12 deficiency is a sign of SIBO as the bacteria bind and utilize B12.



#7 SLaurenAlise

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 04:03 PM

BleuPhire,

 

Do you actually crave gluten?  If so, to what extent?  Is that why it drove you and your family nuts when you went gluten-free, and why you slowly introduced gluten back into your diet?

 

I know that many people have cravings for gluten when they go gluten-free, but I haven't ever experienced that.  (I do have these hilarious, detailed dreams about visiting bakeries, candy stores, dessert buffets... no joke.  So I guess I have subconscious cravings.  My nutritionist and my naturopathic doctor both think that my dreams are pretty funny -- they've never heard of that kind of thing before.)

 

If you're experiencing cravings, people can probably offer some advice as to how to cope with those cravings until they subside and you become used to/satisfied with a gluten-free diet.

 

If you're not experiencing cravings, or if your cravings aren't very strong -- why even try to reintroduce gluten into your diet?



#8 BleuPhire

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 08:13 PM

I'll have to check into the SIBO. I have had a few tests done so may have been tested already. I'm going to the dr. again in May.

 

Lauren, I didn't find it very hard to stay away craving-wise, but socially and conveniently. I washed my hands any time I had to touch bread for the making the kids' food, etc. As long as I put the effort into it and had snacks on hand, I did well. I felt a little outcasted around family. My hubby was supportive and he mostly cooks and he changed a lot of recipes. I decided to eat cake at a wedding and felt fine the next day, so I decided to do a challenge. I was fine for a few weeks but wanted to go back gfree. It seemed though, ironically, that every time I tried to give it up, I got stomach aches and bloating.

 

I went to visit family in a different state and it was impossible to avoid cross-contamination so I gave in. But I also ate mac and cheese and custard. I got very sick that night. This leads me to believe it's lactose/fructose. I am fine being gluten-light, so I thought low fodmap would be an easier lifestyle.



#9 SLaurenAlise

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:52 PM

You know, maybe you don't need to worry so much about cross-contamination... even before I went gluten-free, I ate a "low carb" diet of sorts.  For me, though, that meant avoiding processed sugars, breads and other grains, etc.  I avoided the big stuff (no pasta, no pizza, no cake or cookies, etc.) but didn't worry about sauces with gluten since I'm not celiac.  It's a little bit sad when you can't eat the pizza everyone else is enjoying, but order a nice big steak to make yourself feel better!

 

I would say that since you're not celiac, gluten-light is the way to go.  Since you actually tested as gluten-intolerant, avoid gluten as much as possible -- don't actually eat pastas, breads, cookies, etc... but you probably don't need to worry too much if there's some breading on your chicken breast.  (Although don't eat fried chicken... that's a killer, thanks to the grease.)  But stick to the gluten-free as much as possible... it's not worth getting sick so much, even if you don't react right away.

 

The important thing is that your husband is supportive. Just try to ignore the pressure from other people -- I know how that can be. Some of my family is supportive and understanding about what I can't eat, but my mother-in-law sometimes doesn't seem to understand that I just can't handle the smorgasbord that she has prepared!  Try not to put yourself in too many situations where you have to eat at someone else's house, and if you do have a meal prepared by someone else, bring at least one dish that you can eat.  I like to meet people at restaurants whenever possible as opposed to going to other people's houses for dinner, because inevitably I end up feeling bad that I can't eat what they prepared.  I've got several friends who always send me the recipes for what they would like to serve for dinner if I am coming over, though, which is great.  If you plan ahead, it's a lot easier to avoid the social pressure and it doesn't end up being all that inconvenient.

 

Good luck!



#10 Corydalis

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 07:15 PM

BleuPhire please share how your progress is going with the FODMAP, I am new here and don't know what or how to get to or use it, can you help? I printed off the sheet in red and green with suitable foods and foods to eliminate, is there more around here that I am not coming into contact with? Would appreciate what any of you have to offer! Thank you!



#11 Faith_In_Jesus_Always

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:21 PM

I Am A 41 Yr Old Female I have The Constipation Ibs And If I Eat Certain Foods I Get Alot Of Gas And I Have bloating and Sometimes Even Alot of pain And then diarrea .

I Am Also Lactose Intolerant I Am Going To An Nutritionist Soon She Is Going To Combine All My Diets Into One Including For My Diabetes .

Ibs Has Been Very Hard To Deal With I Do Not Know How To Correctly Eat With It .

I Realized I Needed Help So Thats Why I Contacted A Registered Dietician.I Will Go See Her On The 17th Of May.


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#12 LivingHappyWithIBS

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 04:42 PM

I am very sensitive to wheat and it is one of my biggest triggers. I went gluten free about 2 years ago and it took about 8 months (and every major holiday) to wean the gluten cravings. After that, I didn't even use the gluten free breads because I didn't crave them. I recently went FODMAP free too, so I began to introduce some of the products back in for convenience reasons.

 

Udi's gluten free white bread is a great option and rice pasta is a good substitute. My comfort food when I am feeling bad is homemade lactose-free mashed potatoes. Maybe try to find a different comfort food to turn to?


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#13 Dr. Dani

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Posted 16 August 2013 - 10:29 PM

You may find, as you already suspect, that wheat or gluten in small amounts is ok, especially after a 'wheat holiday' but that if you eat too much or if you are going through a stressful peroid in your life, that your gut may be more reactive.  This is often the case, that foods which you are sensitive to cause more of an issue when chronic stress is involved, because IBS is more than just food triggers-it has a huge mindbody component too! :)



#14 zane21

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:21 AM

Giving up gluten was MISERABLE the first month...the cravings were terrible....after that...it was fine.





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