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Three yearold with IBS?


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#1 mumof3

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 05:24 AM

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Hello!

 

        My son has had GI problems since he started eating solid food, he is now three and a half. He has had lots of tests/investigations all showing that he has no serious problems - no 'organic disease'. Things really improved when he went dairy free one year ago (chronic vomiting stopped) his current symptoms are Diarrhoea/loose stools, lots of faecal accidents,abdominal pain, rectal pain, and anal fissures. He is small for his age and compared to my other children at the same age but is growing. He will start school in September and I really want to get things improved before then. His GI says even though he has diarrhoea/loose stools he is constipated and his current meds are Movicol,Senna, and lactobacillus. A recent course of metronidazole really helped but things have deteriorated since it stopped. His GI is a bit vague and mentions 'irritable bowel' and 'sugar allergies' but doesn't really go into how I might help him - I have researched on the internet and there is so much information out there I don't really know where to start!!

 

  So I was wondering if anyone else had a similar situation with their child and what they did to help - we have briefly tried wheat free, gluten free, 100% homecooked (no additives), none of these really seemed to help and involved a lot of effort! - I am just looking for any suggestions, help, or support!!

 

  Thanks in advance!!



#2 Kathleen M.

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 08:38 AM

Well often it isn't the gluten in the wheat but the starch, you might look at the low FODMAP diet (as that removes most of the sugars and starches that feed the gut bacteria).

 

But that may also be too much work, but may not be as much as the gluten free (as you don't have to avoid all food additives).  Although it does limit the veggies and fruits allowed to certain ones it does tend to also mean eating less processed starch shapes that many of us eat too much of.

 

Kids seem even more prone to diarrhea as a response of the body to constipated stools in the system than adults, so it isn't uncommon for them to be more concerned about constipation.  Often if you can really keep the stools moving then the body doesn't try to flush them out with diarrhea.


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#3 mumof3

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 02:23 PM

Thanks Kathleen!

 

                        Just been looking at the FODMAP diet and think I will give it a go! It all seems to make sense, I may see if I can see a dietician as he is so little I don't want to cut anything out that he may need. Funnily enough he had a bad week last week so I upped his Senna, and he has had less accidents and less severe pain (although more frequent) - so that would fit in with the constipation side of things! I just hope my other little ones will eat the FODMAP stuff!!!!

 

  Thanks again.



#4 tummyrumbles

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 04:59 PM

I'm just wondering if Senna is the right thing for a 3 year old. It sounds fairly harsh. It's sad to think that a 3 year old has IBS, which makes me wonder whether IBS is mainly a problem concerning enzymes. Is it possible that he is severely lactose intolerant and the milk upset the good bacteria in his colon, leading to his current digestive problems? Maybe the proper diet might replace the good bacteria. I'm not sure how this works exactly. The problem with the low starch diet is that people get hungry on it. Plain ordinary wholemeal bread has lower starch than the gluten free, low FODMAP breads and I seem to tolerate it quite well. I'd try him on the diet I'm on, and which is working well for me - mainly gentle, low FODMAP soluble veges and preferably no constipating foods at all (no biscuits, cakes, puddings, all kinds of rice, crackers). Try him on porridge rather than Rice Krispies or Corn Flakes which are very high in starch. Starches fill you up, but you don't need constipating starches. there's plenty of healthier starches that don't constipate. You can message me if you'd like more info on my diet. Things that I've found that cause constipation is: too harsh fibre, high FODMAP fibre, constipating white flour products, and very high starches, which tend to be very dry, crumbly condensed flours.

 

I wish we could have a section devoted to enzymes. I'm wondering if IBS is mainly an enzyme deficiency and whether a friendly IBS diet can heal this. Maybe the good bacteria returns after a while, I certainly hope so anyway.


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#5 smile4lina

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Posted 13 March 2015 - 11:29 PM

I am so sorry to hear this. I have no answers for you.  But just wanted to let you know I read your post and am sad for you.  I have  a 7 yr old boy who is in pain everyday and I feel like there is nothing I can do for him either.  When I registered for this account, I saw over 100 different things you can try from antidepressants, to yoga, to deep breathing, and many more. Maybe one of those things will bring you some relief.  Wishing you the best of doctors.  

 






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