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#21 athlon4800

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 03:54 AM

The next time I do it, likely in October, I will go all out. I will take antibiotics for four weeks.

That is a bad idea. Dr Borody's antibiotic suggestion is a bad idea. The only time antibiotics should be used is when there is a demonstratable infection/pathogen that needs to be removed and there should be no need for antibiotics for four weeks. Once the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration is reached for an antibiotic the bacteria should rapidly die. Often all is needed is 3-5 days of an antibiotic and at most 10-14 days. The reason Dr Borody's suggestion is a bad idea is because no antibiotic can kill all bacteria species. Even the most broad spectrum antibiotics will only kill about 95 percent of organisms. That means the 5 percent of bacteria types not killed by antibiotics will proliferate and cover the colon wall meaning the theory of clearing out bacteria to allow new bacteria space to colonise is flawed. I am not sure there is any evidence to support Dr Borody's theory other than flawed theoretical reasoning. Another risk is overgrowth of yeast and other side effects of antibiotics.

The best approach is done by Taymount Clinic in the U.K. They use laxatives followed by a colonic irrigation session immediately before administrating the implant. This removes fecal matter as well as dramatically reducing ALL bacteria species (something Dr Borody's antibiotic approach does not do) and yeast without any side effects from the colon wall giving space for the implant to adhere to the full length of the colon wall.
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#22 acureisoutthere

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 08:55 AM

Athlon4800,

 

Thank you for your insightful analysis. Certainly the results will verify the best approach.  Your input is impressive.

 

I'm curious, have you any insight on the best approach for re-balancing the microbiome of the stomach, or esophagus ?  (GERD)

 

Also,

I have read of a patient 'fixing' his ear infection (on his own) in his right ear after 3 different antibiotics failed to give relief.  He used a Q tip and swabbed his healthy left ear, then used the same Q tip and swabbed his infected right ear.  The infection went away.   Would you have any thoughts on this ?  This is important, as it opens up a whole  new method of "possibly" treating ear infections in infants and young children.  It      may     be a much safer approach to this problem, as antibiotics, at a young age, have the potential to disrupt the developing microbiome, which we already know plays a crucial a role in our health.

 

Another question;  have you any experience, or insight into nasal and sinus microbiome transplants, and their potential for reversing hay fever or asthma ?


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#23 ShaneM

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 09:18 AM

Sorry, let me rephrase myself. I will not be using an antibiotic; I'm already aware of their ineffectiveness. I will be using herbal antibiotics (hence why I must use them for quite some time). I do feel the herbal antibiotic is a necessary part of the treatment, however; especially if my test for SIBO comes back positive.

#24 MelissM

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 03:56 PM

curious to hear how things are going!



#25 ShaneM

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 09:10 PM

curious to hear how things are going!

 

I'm currently on day 19 out of 28 on my herbal antimicrobial therapy. I have an extremely long and comprehensive plan to eliminate ibs by healing the entirety of the digestive system which I have concocted using years worth of research on the subject. I won't post this plan until I've finished it and actually experience the results because I don't want to waste time if it doesn't work. I have not had ibs since I started the herbal antimicrobials but at the same time I'm following a diet which wouldn't give anyone ibs; I'm 100% positive of this – so me not having any symptoms is simply the stupidly restricted diet I'm on. I'll keep you updated when I finish my entire regimen in about a month's time.



#26 brox914

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 10:43 PM

 
I'm currently on day 19 out of 28 on my herbal antimicrobial therapy. I have an extremely long and comprehensive plan to eliminate ibs by healing the entirety of the digestive system which I have concocted using years worth of research on the subject. I won't post this plan until I've finished it and actually experience the results because I don't want to waste time if it doesn't work. I have not had ibs since I started the herbal antimicrobials but at the same time I'm following a diet which wouldn't give anyone ibs; I'm 100% positive of this so me not having any symptoms is simply the stupidly restricted diet I'm on. I'll keep you updated when I finish my entire regimen in about a month's time.


What are your results?

#27 ShaneM

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 08:23 PM



What are your results?

 

It worked. I've not had any pain whatsoever when passing a bowel movement for about a month and my stool is solid and formed without the leftover pieces of food which used to be present. I never had any doubt that FMT would work it's just a matter of how you go about it. In this post I will comprehensively detail what I did to rid myself of IBS, so take note because this is the important part; also I make no guarantees that this treatment will have the same results for you as it did me but the chances are high. It's not easy, it's definitely definitely not easy; but if you want to truly resolve this problem this could very well help you. Here is what I did:

 

Step 1: Take antimicrobials for 28 days, the antimicrobials which I took were Candibactin-AR and Candibactin-BR. The regimen is: in the morning before anything, including eating, take Biofilm Defense with some water followed by a teaspoon of Apple Cider Vinegar Diluted in water; wait 30 minutes and then take 2 of each antimicrobial pill with a meal. Wait 2 to 3 hours and then take Virgin coconut oil and some cinnamon On Food, Not all at once though. Then again, at dinner time take 2 of each antimicrobial pill with your dinner. Continue this regimen for 28 days whilst following a strict diet. The diet I followed was unbelievably strict and I lost almost too much weight, the diet allows for any kind of meat, green beans, zucchini, Kale, cooked carrots in low amounts, only water, a low amount of strawberries, spinach, shrimp and fish, and not much else; The only seasoning I used was pink Himalayan salt, or any variation of salt and a small amount of black pepper. Honestly I don't know if I would recommend following the same diet I did, but your ultimate goal here is to keep down the amount of carbohydrates, Sugars, and fermentable fiber which you ingest. Review both the specific carbohydrate diet and the low FODMAP Diet and design a diet that works for you. I also recommend Taking a daily multivitamin during this time because your diet is fairly strict and you won't get all your vitamins. Make sure to introduce the antimicrobial pills slowly and also wean off of them slowly to avoid any adverse reaction.

 

Step 2: after you finish with the antimicrobial treatment discontinue taking both the antimicrobials as well as the apple cider vinegar and the coconut oil as well as the cinnamon. Wait a day, then take another day to do a bowel lavage. I used MiraLAX and magnesium citrate to accomplish this; I took one bottle of magnesium citrate Later in the day after taking around 2or 3 ounces of MiraLAX with smart water in the morning. I can't give exact measurements because I just used what I felt would work and I don't want to give advice and Have People taking too much laxative when they shouldn't; I advise looking up how to cleanse yourself for a colonoscopy and following a similar plan of attack to clean yourself out. The purposes of step 1 and 2 are essentially to eliminate the malicious bacteria Which has colonized in your intestines, assuming there is any. I am no doctor, nor can I prescribe this treatment plan for you, I don't know if you should take antimicrobials or not and I don't know how it will affect you personally; I am simply restating exactly what I did, I am not giving advice.

 

Step 3: do 10FMT in a row; Make sure to have your donor tested. Honestly they don't all have to be in a row, you can space them out between a few days. Use the procedure that I posted in my original post on this thread. However, the only difference to the procedure that I had was we heated the water using the toaster oven and a glass pan rather than the microwave just to be careful (I don't want microwaves getting into the water that will go into my colon, assuming this is even possible) And also we did not use a blender, we mixed the solution in a plastic baggie. Try to get the sample out Of the donor and into you As quick as possible. Use the positions that the freeman used; also linked in my original post. Hold the FMT solution in as long as you can each time Without going to the restroom; I was able to hold each solution for 12 hours or more – but if you really have to go, don't worry too much about it because you'll be doing it multiple times so you can hold it in longer the next time. Slowly reintroduce fiber and carbohydrates during this period of time so that the new bacteria has a means of cultivation. Again, make sure the reintroduction is slow and the fiber isn't too much to handle. Green beans, kale, spinach, things that are easier on the stomach and not to fermentable would be wise at the start. Eventually, after 5 or more days you can reintroduce fermentable foods very slowly.Try to keep your sugar intake low and avoid junk food.It's up to you at this point to determine what diet you feel you are comfortable with.

 

Step 4: wait about a week after doing all FMTs and then take probiotics to repopulate your small intestine which is not reached by the FMT. I recommend taking Sibiotica and S. Boulardii. Pop open the capsules and empty about three fourths of the capsule before taking it for both probiotics. You don't want too many bacteria or you may lead to another overgrowth.Continue this for about a week and then you're done.

 

I realized throughout this entire process that one big part of having IBS, especially for someone like me who is obsessive-compulsive, is it becomes an obsession. I was constantly coming to this forum and reviewing ways to rid myself of IBS and it became a huge obsession for me without me even recognizing it. I honestly almost did not want to even come here to write this post because I'm working to break my obsessions and I'm sick of obsessing over IBS, But I felt it was important to share with all of you what I did to fix myself because it could help many of you out there breakout of the living hell that is ibs. If you have an obsessive personality, don't turn this treatment plan into an obsession that stresses you out like I did. Remember stress and anxiety play a huge role when it comes to IBS, so I highly recommend throughout this whole procedure working with your mind to achieve a state of peace and avoiding stress and anxiety as much as possible. With this in mind, I have written out all the information you should need in this post and I will not be returning to this forum. If you desperately need clarification in some way You can email me at [email protected] Good luck!

 

To review once more, this was simply the treatment plan which worked for me and this is a detailing of my experience. I am not advising anyone to do this exact same treatment plan; nor do I have any idea of how it will affect you and whether it will work or not. I am no Doctor and it is up to you to determine whether you feel this is the proper plan for you or not. I do suggest working with a healthcare professional if possible but many of them would not be helpful in this situation, unfortunately.



#28 jaumeb

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Posted 11 November 2015 - 09:46 AM

I guess you'll never read this message as you say you'll never come back to this forum. Anyway, thank for sharing your experience.

It is normally not a good idea to post an email address on a public forum. A spambot may find and use it to spam you. It is much better to use the forum's private message system.

#29 acureisoutthere

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Posted 11 November 2015 - 06:32 PM

Shane M,

 

I am so glad for you that it worked !  Like I have said, Dr Borody, in Australia is reversing IBS.  I am happy that you have found relief and reversed your symptoms. 

 

You should create a new posting, and describe your efforts again.


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#30 brox914

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 08:31 AM

The Biofilm part of this is an interesting component. Where did that idea come from? And how bad is the associated die-off?

#31 ShaneM

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 10:34 AM

The Biofilm part of this is an interesting component. Where did that idea come from? And how bad is the associated die-off?

Biofilm is essentially a structure formed by bacteria, in the colon and otherwise, to protect itself. Malicious bacteria can create Biofilm which therefore makes it immune to antibiotics or antimicrobials; that's the theory at least. Biofilm Defense is a specific set of enzymes that when taken on an empty stomach is supposed to help break down thesee Biofilms so the antimicrobials can effectively target all malicious bacteria. I don't particularly know too much on biofilms, I took the pill simply to make sure all bases were covered. There's tons of articles and research out there that you can review on the subject.

The die-off will be different for each person, so there's no way I can answer that. I imagine the more malicious bacteria you have covered by Biofilm the more of a reaction you may have uncovering it. I personally had no reaction.

#32 acureisoutthere

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Posted 27 December 2015 - 05:07 PM

Hi ShaneM,

 

Just wondering how you are doing ? 

I really admire the effort you put into your understanding, and am so happy for you for your success in reversing your IBS.

 

I came across something interesting.  Chris Kresser interviews Glen Taylor, of the Taymount Clinic. He's performed more than 600 FMTs 

Here's the quote.

 

"People are coming in for post-antibiotic, post-infectious IBS, for a combination of constipation and diarrhea  or one or the other, and we have some very, very, happy  {indescernible} people walking home at the moment.  And I think it's perhaps it won't take too long before FMT becomes the treatment of choice, the first treatment of choice for all IBS."

 

As far as I can tell, Glen is working on an oral capsule for an FMT.  I get the feeling he is on to something special, yet is holding back from publishing until he get's more statistical evidence.  Never-the-less it is very encouraging.


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#33 ShaneM

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 10:42 PM

Hi ShaneM,

 

Just wondering how you are doing ? 

I really admire the effort you put into your understanding, and am so happy for you for your success in reversing your IBS.

 

I came across something interesting.  Chris Kresser interviews Glen Taylor, of the Taymount Clinic. He's performed more than 600 FMTs 

Here's the quote.

 

"People are coming in for post-antibiotic, post-infectious IBS, for a combination of constipation and diarrhea  or one or the other, and we have some very, very, happy  {indescernible} people walking home at the moment.  And I think it's perhaps it won't take too long before FMT becomes the treatment of choice, the first treatment of choice for all IBS."

 

As far as I can tell, Glen is working on an oral capsule for an FMT.  I get the feeling he is on to something special, yet is holding back from publishing until he get's more statistical evidence.  Never-the-less it is very encouraging.

 

I am doing well; I still don't have the best "looking" stools but I no longer get any sort of pain and haven't for a long time; then again I still eat a fairly healthy diet but nothing like before. My understanding of Irritable Bowel Syndrome has drastically changed since the FMT as I've begin to understand more about myself and the nature of the condition. My research into this area is very fundamental and I've not quite understood it yet, but it's food for thought. 

 

I've done much research into the area of MindBody Disorders. Essentially what these disorders are, are distractions caused by the subconscious. The purpose of these distractions is to keep you away from your emotions, namely fear. Meaning if you enter into a situation which creates a high level of fear or anxiety your body will subconsciously set off a symptom (IBS or otherwise) to either draw your full attention or remove you from the situation. Now the reason this concept is so interesting for IBS is because I had noticed a drastic reduction in IBS prior to my FMT simply because I didn't spend time constantly worrying about it. On the days where IBS consumed my full attention and my focus was on the fear of "What if I get an attack?" "What if I get ill during x or x" I would without a doubt get ill at some point that day; however when IBS didn't cross my mind and therefore the fear was absent I tended to not have issues. 

 

This plays into many many other symptoms which I've experienced; feeling like I had cancer, or uneven eyes, or hernia, etc. I've been through so many countless strange feelings and symptoms which would last for months up until the point that I decided to not worry about them. When I say not worry, I genuinely mean I would let them go of them. They would no longer cross my mind nor would the fear of the symptom bother me, and with that the symptoms would fade into non-exsistance. Interestingly enough I feel IBS might fall into the same realm of exsistence. My IBS truly and completely went away after the FMT, but with that so did my fear. When I did the FMT I knew deep down "This has fixed other people, so I'll do it and therefore I'll no longer have IBS." and I almost wonder if it was the FMT that cured me or that genuine belief that it would which therefore eliminated the fear. I've been living with chronic pain for quite some time and the more I've read the pain I seem to have falls into the same category of mindbody disorders. 

 

Now I can't say much on the treatment for these disorders; other than you must fully convince the mind that there is nothing to fear. It's the fear that keeps the problem going, and because the fear is subconcious it's difficult to eliminate. It has to come to a point where the concept of even having IBS never crosses your mind, almost like unlearning a trait. Each day when I had IBS I knew I would get sick, I knew it was an issue which I would have daily and with that I had it daily. Generally the only way to overcome the fear is to whole-heartedly let it go, stop letting it consume you and your thoughts and just let everything be as it is. Now this is easier said than done, seeing that telling yourself "I'm not afraid" or trying not to think about IBS or whatever symptom you may have is the same thing as thinking about it, haha. I'll come back to update everyone once I've figured out this ambiguous condition, which I have no doubt I'm on the verge of doing. 

 

Now with all that said this is by no means a way to discredit FMT, it's simply a hypothetical concept. Perhaps it was the FMT that brought me lasting relief (if it was then it's soooo worth it), and if you think it may help you then do give it a shot. Of course you'll want to avoid certain foods whether the condition is mentally derived or not simply because an anxious gut is easily upset. There's a lot more to the condition of IBS, chronic pain, and anxiety than I feel we currently know and I'll be interested to see where the future takes me. For those of you still suffering, or for those who are going to attempt the FMT (Just do it if you think it's right for you and have a healthy donor! It's well worth it and not as bad as it seems) I wish you the best of luck, and I'll be back in a couple of months time or however long before I understand the mind-body connection fully. 

 

P.S. If you can handle them, carrots taste really good and do absolute wonders for my stomach (raw). They are high fiber though so if you struggle with fiber be careful!



#34 jaumeb

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 05:02 AM

Some cases of IBS are partially psychological. These patients improve when they forget about it. And then there are patients that forget about IBS when the symptoms get better.

#35 acureisoutthere

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 07:06 AM

The thinking by many gastroenterologist is that  IBS is all in your head.  Which is a completely outdated understanding.  The truth is, these gastroenterologist are not reading everything they can on the human microbiome, and do not understand that it is the bacteria in our gut that is affecting our cognitive behavior.  Case in point;  Depression has been reversed by an FMT.

 

The gut communicates with the brain via the Vegas nerve, and another channel. 

 

Sorry, out of time this morning.


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#36 ShaneM

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 05:21 PM

The thinking by many gastroenterologist is that  IBS is all in your head.  Which is a completely outdated understanding.  The truth is, these gastroenterologist are not reading everything they can on the human microbiome, and do not understand that it is the bacteria in our gut that is affecting our cognitive behavior.  Case in point;  Depression has been reversed by an FMT.

 

The gut communicates with the brain via the Vegas nerve, and another channel. 

 

Sorry, out of time this morning.

 

Well, no. If Depression and Anxiety are curable by FMT than it wouldn't make sense that I still have all the cognitive issues I suffered from prior even though my gut now functions. I feel it's the other way around; rather than the microbiome heavily influencing cognitive functions, the way someone thinks influences their microbiome. I've not yet heard of anyone who's "cured" themselves of anxiety using FMT, only people who've noticed they feel a bit better anxiety-wise. Though there are people, who, by changing the way they think and view the world were able to achieve lasting change and let go of anxiety; if the microbiome controlled depression and anxiety then such a change would not be possible, no? 

 

And like I said my theory is hypothetical, and I'm not saying IBS is "all in your head," that's quite wrong. The symptoms and feeling are very, very real and painful - though they act as a defense mechanism to distract you from what your mind considers to be overwhelming fear or anxiety. The feelings are real, but the mind plays a role in initiating those feelings. Honestly IBS could very well have both a psychological component and a physical component; it's tough to figure out - but I do feel the way we think has a ton to do with it. 



#37 jaumeb

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 05:51 AM

The brain-gut axis works in both directions, and it changes from patient to patient.

Many optimistic and cheerful people find that a chronic digestive disease change their personality.

And then there are ibs success stories with psychotherapy and hypnotherapy.

Not all ibs are equal. That's where the difficulty lays.

#38 mellosphere

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 11:37 PM

Some cases of IBS are partially psychological. These patients improve when they forget about it. And then there are patients that forget about IBS when the symptoms get better.

 

I totally agree with this. I forget about IBS on days when my symptoms get better. And that's why it is so frustrating to have people say it's in my mind. No, it's in my body, that's why it's on my mind all the time. 

 

There are a lot of confounding factors. It is hard to work out what causes what when everything plays off other factors. 



#39 ShaneM

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 12:06 AM

Hello everyone. This is a follow-up message in regards to my experience with the FMT quite some time ago. My reason for this follow-up is because it was frustrating to read stories of FMTs and then never hear about the results down the road. 

 

So... To start; the good news: I do not suffer from IBS anymore. The excruciating pain that I used to be far too accustomed to no longer occurs; and IBS is no longer something which I fear. Now, the not so good(?) news - IBS may be more complicated than I had originally assumed. 

 

Now, to start - my IBS did "fix" after the Fecal Matter Transplant. Past that point I had very few occurrences of IBS pains and now I get none. So, in regards to the transplant, I'd have to say the same as most others on this forum: it's very much worth a shot if you're considering it. Obviously be very careful with the procedure and how you go about it - I don't want anyone doing anything weird. It's a procedure just like any other; so the same way a doctor would take care, you should too. It worked for me, and for many others, so it does hold validity. I strongly recommend it multiple days in a row, rather than just once.

 

Following that I wanted to note that my IBS had been residing to some degree prior to the FMT (I still had pains every few days, however - which I no longer get) and I attribute this to quite a few things which I wanted to detail here for anyone whom is still suffering. 

 

The very first thing; change your diet. I'm sure many, many of you have already taken this approach but I can not stress it enough. I used to eat nothing but sheer junk food; and that was a big part of my problem. The bowel likes to be treated with respect; and in turn it will treat you with respect. Eat natural, and healthy. I did weeks and weeks of research on the "best" foods to eat, which though I don't recommend committing the same amount of time, I feel is a worthwhile endeavor. Stick to vegetables, meat is okay, avoid heavy spices, caffeine, or heavy sauces, stick away from coffee, emphasize tea (decaffeinated), fruits are okay in moderation. It takes a lot of adjustment, but it's well worth it; and once you're adjusted you don't even consider eating junk foods anymore. For reference, I tend to stick to turkey meat, chicken, lamb, any vegetable, any fruit (just not too much of it), cranberry juice, green tea & chamomile tea, gluten-free bread, gluten-free and dairy free pot pies, carrots, dairy free coconut butter, organic potato chips (moderation), seaweed. Drink A LOT of water each day (I do natural spring water). 

 

I emphasize the seaweed, because it does well to help the gut. Also try to emphasize natural probiotic - my favorite being kombucha flavored like orange soda with natural sugar. Also sauerkraut. Anything that heals the gut, and that you can handle, is good. The diet thing may seem complicated; but find out what feels good to your gut and what it dislikes; then make adjustments - it gets easy, very easy over time. I'd definitely recommend cutting out dairy / lactose / gluten to pretty much anyone. Also the diet takes time to heal the gut, so it's something you have to stick to and it's a very important part of the process. 

 

Next comes the psychological element of IBS. This, I feel, plays a large role (though of course I'm sure IBS is very much fixable with what's listed above ^). I feel IBS is the bodies way of alleviating too much stress or repressed emotions. You may be repressing stress, or some other emotion to the point where the body must let it out; and it does so through IBS. IBS in this sense, might be the compulsion of the bowel and spasming of the muscles to let out excess adrenaline or whatever emotion has been repressed. It could also be ones reaction to IBS. A fear reaction to IBS, may in turn trigger IBS. I know back when I had IBS I was always scared of an attack; and when I begin to get the pains I would react out of fear, and that furthered the problem. This, unfortunately, isn't something you can change immediately. The mind can not control learned emotion through logic. That means, when you have an attack; if you already fear it, you can not immediately alleviate the fear. In this sense, when you get an IBS attack or anything that "feels" like IBS; don't think your way out of it. If you get scared, get scared. Feel the emotion associated with IBS. Don't go into the train of thought "I might have an attack!" or "Not here" etc. Just feel the emotion arising with IBS. "Feel" the IBS to the best of your ability without trying to suppress or stop it. Let it come, let it run it's course whether this means going to the restroom or not, and let it go. If you practice this act of no longer suppressing IBS; it will in time help to alleviate the condition. This, of course, is my theory however. You are absolutely free to follow the prior advice and not this, but not responding to IBS like it was something horrible helped me to slowly lose my fear of the condition, which helped to alleviate the condition a fair bit.

 

To further this point for those who are interested: I'll use Obsessive Compulsive Disorder as an example. With OCD, when one encounters something they fear, let's say... Germs, they avoid it. They are afraid of the emotion and the thoughts that arise associated with germs, so they either act out in compulsion to alleviate that fear or avoid the situation entirely. The more they actively do this, the worse the fear becomes, and the worse the "germs," or at least, their perception of the germs, becomes. IBS, I believe, acts in a similar manner. When one "feels" IBS certain emotions and thoughts arise. These emotions, thoughts, and generally pain are uncomfortable and so people become afraid of them and attempt to suppress them. This fear, in the same way it does in OCD, I feel maintains IBS. This is why, when the emotions, pain, and discomfort associated with IBS arises you must simply let it run it's course. You can not "logically think" your way out of fear. The only option is to fully and openly experience whatever emotions and feelings (even pain) that IBS brings along with it. Let the emotion in, let the stomach discomfort in, let it be. Feel it fully and treat it like you would any other emotion. When you stop fearing the presence of IBS, it starts to lose it's power. This, of course, is not the holistic approach to treating IBS but I do feel it is very important; and would serve great dues alongside the rest of what I've listed here.

 

Another psychological element of IBS that I feel may help. Avoid obsession. If you find you spend all day looking up how to cure IBS, or worrying you'll have an attack, etc. If IBS constantly takes up your mind then this may be adding to your fear of the condition. The same way health anxiety works; if you spend each and every day afraid of IBS, and looking up ways to fix it or make it go away, this might worsen the psychological reaction to it. I don't think figuring out how to heal the gut is wrong, just research it until you feel you have a good understanding, then let go of constant research and thinking about it and just employ what you've learned. Don't make the focus of your days IBS; let it be a background character. Avoid obsession and fear to the best of your ability. I recommended reading Dr. John Sarno as well, for more in this area.

 

I feel the fear of IBS plays a subtantial role in IBS; so I do recommend giving the prior three paragraphs some time.

 

Psychological stuff is a bit difficult. It may not be absolutely necessary to cure IBS; but it is something I strongly, strongly recommend. If you feel overwhelmed by the psychological stuff here don't let it cause you too much stress. Just take things one at a time, and figure out what works for you. 

 

Side notes but very important: Sleep! 8 Hours! Deep sleep in a dark room! Take care of yourself in any way you can holistically. This will help IBS; and your entire body as well. Also... Exercise, as much as you can. Maintain activity even if that just means daily walks for an hour or two. 

 

So I'll conclude my message there. I no longer have IBS; it's gone. I eat very well, very healthy, and junk food is foreign nature to me and has been for years, haha. I sleep properly and for 8 hours or longer if time allows. I strongly feel the FMT could help and do recommend it so long as you're careful with the procedure. Natural probitiocs and Seaweed help. Take overall care of your body, learn what your gut can and can't handle, and respect that. 

 

IBS has a lot of elements to it. It takes time to heal. Nothing will go perfectly at first and the improvement may seem slow; but it's there. I couldn't eat nuts a year or so back and now I can eat any amount without an issue. Manage stress, learn to accept the emotions that arise with IBS and throughout the day; try not to get stuck in fearful thought. Treat your body with love and respect in any way you can. Etc. etc. 

 

I've rambled on and said what I can say. IBS is a condition which can be fixed, whether it be physically, psychologically, or through the FMT - it takes time, the same as healing any other part of the body. 

 

Tl;dr: This section is for me to summarize my points with less depth, but I do suggest reading it because it's where I can thoroughly clear my facts for anyone here. #1. Diet - Eat organic: meat, vegetables, a low amount of fruit, and organic healthy snacks (Kale Chips are a good example). If something upsets your stomach, it's pry best to leave it out for now whilst you heal. If everything upsets your stomach; stick to the foods I listed earlier in the post. Drink A LOT of water each day. Eat seaweed. Emphasize natural probiotic. #2. Physical: Exercise each and every day with some rest days. Sleep on a consistent schedule in a proper environment for at least 8 hours. #3. Psychological: Unlearn your fear of IBS. When the feeling of IBS arises, let it be. Let it run it's course and breath deeply. If you need to use the restroom, then make your way to the restroom. Let the feeling of IBS and the pain that accompanies it come, and let it go. You no longer need to react with fear to this feeling; just let it be and respect it. Also look into meditation, managing stress, and understanding emotion and yourself. This takes time, and it's a lot of things to understand; but I do feel it very much helps with IBS. No longer fearing IBS, I feel, is a big part of curing it. #4. The FMT. It works, though it takes a little time to show full results. I definitely recommend it. I recommend it multiple days in a row however, rather than just once. I tried it one time and it did not work near as well as when I tried it multiple days in a row. #6. Overall Wellness: IBS takes time to heal. It took me a lot of experimentation of what I could handle, and what I couldn't, and a fair bit of time healing my gut; but it did heal. Don't get discouraged; I genuinely wish everyone here the best. Good luck!
 

P.S. If you would like to contact me for further clarification or questions please use the email: [email protected] 

I do not actively check the IBS forums; so this would be your best bet at contacting me.



#40 acureisoutthere

acureisoutthere

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 12:14 PM

Well written post ShaneM.

 

I'm glad to hear you are doing better, and better !  That's really great.  You bring up many good points.  Kudos.

 

I agree, eating the proper foods are pretty important.  Our choice of foods influences which bacteria thrive in our gut.  For example; fresh vegetables with resistant starches encourage the growth of our good bacteria, while eating sugary products increases the number of our bad bacteria. So diet is very important to our health.   Including fermented foods in your diet, (if you can handle them) is also beneficial.  I read this so many times.  I just ordered my first fermentation crock from Stone Creek Trading.  It's the 5 liter size and should be perfect for me.  I tried a batch a while back in a glass cookie jar, but it didn't go very well, and I had to throw it out.  The problem was in keeping the material below the brine, and maintaining an air lock to prevent the growth of fungi.  The water seal airlock of the one I ordered is clever.  I also liked the glass weights over the stone weights, as you don't need to boil and sterilize porous stones..  I've got one ordered for myself, and one for my son. It's a Boleslawiec design.

 

I've even read about 'fermentation festivals' that have started on the east coast somewhere.   Apparently, it's catching on.

 

Since my successful transplant last year I have continued to ponder why some FMTs are successful, and some are not.  I continually remind myself that I am basically a bacterial ecosystem, with bacteria cells outnumbering my human cells by 1.4 to 1.  I am mostly bacteria, and I need to act like these bacteria matter, because they do play an amazing role in my health. The stacks of papers around my desk from research reports and other articles talk about the many aspects of this.

 

Recently, I've summarized my thoughts on improvements we can make, and hopefully have better outcomes.  I've sent these to doctors that are doing FMTs in the sincere hope that we can improve outcomes.  If just one thing helps them improve outcomes, it was worth my time.  I'll review them here :

 

1.   The 'Freeman'  added a food product to the sample before transplant.  At first I didn't recognize it's role.  But, then I realized it's importance for giving the 'new' species of bacteria a boost when one is doing an FMT.  However, since our good bacteria thrive on fresh vegetables, I make a suggestion to mix the sample with Healthy Greens (by V8) instead, thus giving the good bacteria a beneficial boost at this important step.  So, now instead of mixing the sample with sterile saline, one could use Healthy Greens to homogenize the sample.  Of course, we should try to do this in an anaerobic manner (the ziplock bag approach) to eliminate exposure to air, as much as possible, since air kills 90% of these bacteria.  The blender approach that persists on the internet is terribly flawed.

 

2.  The most experienced doctor in the world doing FMTs, Dr. Thomas Borody, does a clean out with Murilax, prior to the transplant.  However most clean out protocols recommend a liquid diet of sugary products for two days prior to the use of the Murilax solution.  I suggest using Healthy Greens, even during this step, in order to always promote the growth of our good bacteria, and limit the growth of our bad bacteria.   One could also use Healthy Greens to mix with the Murilax instead of the Gatoraide.  It's a healthy product with electrolytes that we need.

 

3.  Some bacteria die in as little as 20 minutes, some take much longer.  So, a couple of important things here.  First, being completely empty after the use of the Murilax solution for a period of time may play a role. I started the Murilax at 1:00 pm.  By 5:00 pm, I was completely empty, no more of anything coming out.  I didn't do my transplant until 24 hours later.  Sure, I was very, very hungry but I wanted to do everything possible to wipe out the existing species of bacteria that were giving me such problems. 

The second part of this is;  when the donor "delivers' the sample (in the ziplock bag with the air squeezed out)  the transplant should be done, as soon as possible, thus limiting natural die-off.  So, timing of everything is helpful.

 

4.  Last year I realized that the appendix was playing a role in FMT success.  I wrote to Dr. Borody about this.  Six months later I read that the appendix is now thought to be a reservoir for bacteria which helps to repopulate the large intestine after a case of diarrhea.  So, with this understanding, the practice of multiple 'top-off' infusions via enema,(after the initial transplant )    daily for 10 days, as Dr. Borody is doing, makes complete sense.  It also makes sense that just one transplant procedure may not be enough to re-set the system for everyone, and thus doing it completely over again at one month intervals may be necessary in order to finally change out the bacteria that reside and dominate in the appendix and the rest of the system.  We all want it to be easy, it's just not always that way.

 

5.  The use of Biofilm  Defense as mentioned in other posts may play a significant role in eliminating the existing bacteria population. 

 

6.  Avoiding processed foods.  It was in the news this last year about the emulsifiers in processed foods.  They are causing inflammation in the gut, to our microbiome. We can't expect to restore this ecosystem if we continue to mistakenly consume products that irritate or cause inflammation at the same time.  So, both donor and recipient should be avoiding processed foods.  Emulsifiers in these foods are under different names and are hard to spot.

  Another reason for avoiding processed foods :  the added sugars.  Since it is well known that sugars are feeding our bad bacteria, and also contributing to pre-diabetes, and diabetes, we should avoid processed for this reason as well.  Sugars are being added to just about everything in an attempt by food producers to encourage us to buy more of their product.  Scientific medical research is beginning to understand that this is a big mistake. 

 

7.  Roundup.   A recent, well written report has found that Roundup residues are killing our good, beneficial bacteria, while not harming our bad bacteria.  It's also being connected with the rise in gluten intolerance.  Since I have from 2,000 to 40,000 species of mostly good bacteria in my large intestine, this is a pretty bad product, and I am busy writing letters to bring attention to this harm.  Roundup is used on GMO corn, soybeans, wheat and other products. It's even used to desiccate the foliage prior to harvest, thus putting more of that product on the seed kernel.   So, trying to avoid gluten containing products may be helpful.  I know this is a challenge, but when we know this product, even is small amounts, is harmful to our good bacteria, then we have to try to avoid it.  I'm now using sprouted organic bread. 

 

8.  Finding the right donor.  Donor selection is important.  The average American has lost 40% of the diversity of this ecosystem of bacteria, the Human Microbiome.  We know that athletes have more diverse microbiomes than the average person, so this is an important part of selection.  The greater the diversity of this ecosystem is associated with better health, and thus making better donors.

Antibiotic use wrecks havoc on these bacteria.  So, the longer the period of time since the last use of antibiotics the better.  So, if you've got a donor that hasn't had   any   antibiotics in 10 years, and they exercise regularly, are slender and/or have an excellent BMI , and in absolute perfect health, no hay fever, depression, etc, etc. then you may have a good candidate.  They need to be in perfect health, even have good oral health, no psychological issues, no allergies, no problems at all.  Yet, they need to be athletic, and not have had antibiotics in a long time.  I know this is a challenge, as so many of us have issues already from our over use of antibiotics and poor dietary choices.    Donor health and donor selection is critical.

 

The donor should eat a diet high in fresh fruits and fresh vegetables for two weeks prior to the donation, thus increasing the numbers of good, beneficial bacteria.  They should avoid all processed foods, and sugars, and avoid gluten.  The recipient should do the same after the transplant.  Cooked vegetables are OK.  Reduce meat consumption.  Encourage your donor to eat good fermented foods too.  They help to provide the good bacteria that our bodies need.  Increase your consumption of fermented probiotic foods.

 

9.  Mouthwash and Chlorine.  These both kill bacteria. So when we have this new understanding that we are mostly bacteria, it's pretty clear that these are not only killing harmful bacteria, their killing our good bacteria as well.  We can't expect to restore this ecosystem of bacteria  via an FMT if we continue to ingest products that are at the same time causing harm, and killing bacteria.  I've installed a whole house chlorine removal system , and haven't used mouthwash in a long time.   Toothpaste is a low grade poison.  It hasn't been proven to cause no harm to our beneficial bacteria.  So, until I find research proving that it doesn't harm my good bacteria, I won't use it.  I still brush and floss daily with just water, and once per week use some baking soda.  Of course, I've tried to eliminate almost all sugars from my diet.

 

10.   Medicines and over the counter products.  Several of these are harmful to our microbiomes.  If you are taking one, please research whether it has an affect, or not, on your microbiome.  Some example of ones that do :   All antibiotics.  NSAIDS.  PPIs.  Aspirin.

 

11.   Chemicals.  A recent news article talked about the long list of chemicals in our house dust.  So, have these chemicals been proven to not cause harm to our good bacteria ?  I am doubtful.  I think we have to look at every area of our lives and ask, "Is what I am using or ingesting harmful to my good, helpful bacteria ?" 

 

12.  Antibacterial soaps and other antibacterial products.  The average American has been found to be urinating triclosan.  We have that much exposure. It kills bacteria.    So, if we continue to use a product, whether it be a pair of scissors, or some other antibacterial impregnated product, or antibacterial hand soap, then we expose our good bacteria to something that is killing them.  A big mistake.  While I know that FDA has recently banned their use in new products, we have to realize we may still have products in our home that have these bacteria killers in or on them. 

 

13.  Cosmetic products.   Cosmetics have no regulation or testing by the FDA.  We simply have no understanding at all, if there are ingredients in these that are harmful to our good bacteria.  Has anyone besides me, wondered why women tend to have more IBS, than men  ?   This is what research is finding anyhow.  There just may be a connection here that science hasn't looked at yet.  If you find anything on cosmetics and the microbiome, please share.

 

14.  Palm oil has been found to be causing low grade inflammation.  It is also known to have antimicrobial properties.  So, I question it's use.  I just use Canola oil, and I try to avoid hydrogenated oils as much as I can. 

 

15.  Oral health.  Cass Nelson-Dooley makes some very interesting observations while talking with Dr. Kara Fitgerald.   Our oral microbiome health plays a role not only in cardiovascular health, but it also plays a role in arthritis, and it also influences the health of our large intestine microbiome as well.  Cutting out all sugars is good for our oral health and elsewhere.  Flossing regularly is important for many reasons.

 

16.  Exercise.  We know that athletes tend to have more diverse microbes.  There is some natural process here that influences your gut health.  So, beginning and maintaining an exercise program in conjunction with an FMT should be part of the process.

 

17.   Donor relationship. One report talked about there being a   slight   increase in success from donors that are related to the recipient.

However, Glen Taylor tries to use several different donors, thus increasing overall diversity of the sample. So, at this stage of understanding, it's unclear. 

 

18.  Some form of antibiotic 'knockdown'. I used Xifaxan, which is only effective in the Gi tract, and isn't absorbed into the bloodstream.  ShaneM used a more natural product and also had success.  Borody uses an antibiotic regimen before the clean-out phase.

At this point, it seems that some form of antibiotic 'knockdown' is helpful for success. 

 

 

I know this has been a long post.   I've tried to be concise and clear.  I encourage anyone to look into my suggestions.  I am hopeful that we can perfect this procedure and that many, many more people can find help from this.  I know the biggest challenge for the DIY is to avoid contact with air; we can only do so much without the right equipment.  I am saddened that this procedure costs so very much at the clinics that do offer it. We've got to look for every possible mistake and solve it, if we are going to increase our success rates.

 

I am continuing to do fine with no return of IBS symptoms.  I still don't have dairy back, and just avoid it.  My acid reflux is 95 % gone too, so that is nice.  I continue to try to raise awareness about the human microbiome to local people, so they can understand and make better decisions for their health.  I am intrigued by recent research on the microbiome and cancer and am hopeful that one day soon researchers will use an FMT to restore the bacterial ecosystem after chemotherapy and discover if this improves outcomes for deadly  cancers that generally have poor outcomes with conventional treatment.

 

Shane has made such a great post and I'm really happy for his success.  I just wanted to share in the hope that more people can have success.


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