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How to treat gastritis/esophagitis

gastritis esophagitis

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#1 richgel999

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 12:19 AM

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Earlier this year I posted how I healed from SIBO. Thankfully, my SIBO is still gone. This post is how I healed from Gastritis/Esophagitis twice (in 2015 and 2016). I'm posting this here to help others avoid the pain and expense that I went through.

 

The first time, I had SIBO/IBS-C and leaky gut, and I took Betaine HCL which I think contributed to it. (I will *never* take Betaine HCL again. It's too dangerous IMO.) This time I was scoped twice, before and after healing. Later, in 2016, I was still healing from SIBO and a large course of antibiotics. I went way too fast with my diet and ate something too spicy at a restaurant, which caused a large amount of acid to pour into my stomach.

 

The proton pumps that secrete acids into the stomach are supposed to operate in a tight feedback loop. There are sensors in your stomach that detect acid levels, and the feedback loop should suppress secretion of acids once the levels are correct for digestion. But, as far as I can tell for me, overly spicy foods or even supplements such as L-Theanine can disrupt this feedback loop and cause large amounts of acids to pour into the stomach, causing damage that is slow to heal.

 

If you're in pain, your stomach's cytoprotection is weak or non-existent, and you possibly have leaky gut. (If you react badly to foods while they are still in your stomach, you may have leaky gut.) With gastritis, you may feel fine until you eat the wrong type of meal which requires a lot of acid to digest, which will then irritate the tissues causing pain later. Gastritis is hard to treat because it heals very slowly, and the pain signals are non-linear. By the time you're in pain you've already done a lot of damage, and as it heals the pain goes away quickly so you may over do it. With gastritis you need to take things slowly and carefully. Just because you're no longer in pain doesn't mean you can assume you're fine and eat anything you want.

 

Here's what I did to heal both times:

 

- Took Prilosec 20 or 40mg, to cut the acid down so the tissues can heal without further irritation. 

After getting scoped, this is what my GI specialist suggested I do, and he was right. This is an important step, otherwise your stomach will just keep getting damaged over and over again randomly from normal acid secretion.

 

Prilosec is basically the devil, and you don't want to take it too long because it decreases absorption of nutrients/minerals and could cause SIBO. But for Gastritis, you want to get all irritants out of the way so the gut tissues can heal as quickly as possible. Once the tissues are healed you can slowly taper off Prilosec.

(Be sure to supplement methyl B-12 while on Prilosec.)

 

There's a delay before Prilosec works, so for the first day or two you may want to take something faster acting like an H2 blocker such as Zantac etc.

 

- Eat simple, non-irritating meals. Use common sense when choosing meals: Imagine your stomach lining with little to no gut mucous protecting it. Before eating or drinking anything, ask yourself "would this food irritate it?"

 

Don't choose super heavy foods which would require a lot of stomach acid to properly digest. I ate lots of home made organic chicken soup with carrots and rice, a few fruits (dates, raisins), cashew butter, home made yogurt, salads, and coconut milk. Keep it simple. Stay away from foods which could contribute to SIBO, such as sugar or refined carbs, and make sure your motility stays high.

 

- If you're in a lot of pain, try shining an far infrared light (from a small heater) directly on your stomach, or a heating pad. Obviously, don't get burned, and put the light on the lowest setting (mine had 2 settings, 400 and 800 watts). This also increases blood flow to the area.

 

- Supplements that helped me, discovered via a lot of searching, paper reading, and experimentation:

Liquid Melatonin: I used the Source Naturals brand. Avoid the stuff with sugar alcohols. If you're in a lot of pain, don't be afraid to try more than 10mg (I've used up to 20mg/day). Melatonin acted like a strong, almost immediate pain reliever on many occasions. My GI doctor was amazed how quickly I healed and I believe Melatonin was one of the key factors.

 

Licorice tea, licorice root: Other say try DGL, which I've found to be useless/unreliable. In this case, don't mess around with questionable/weak supplements, and get the real thing. Licorice raises cortisol, so try to take it in the morning or early afternoon. (Be sure to Google "licorice side effects" - be aware of them, and don't take it more than you need to.)

 

Colostrum: I used Symbiotics Colostrum. Helps rebuild the gut lining, and will help calm the immune system if you have leaky gut. Buy a big tub of it, and if you can only get capsules be prepared to go through a lot of them. I would take 5000-10000 milligrams a day, or more. Don't be shy - treat it like a food.

 

"Aloe 80 Organics Stomach Drink": Take on an empty stomach 1-3 times/day. This should be immediately soothing if taken on an empty stomach. This is the only Aloe Vera supplement I've found that worked for me.

 

L-Glutamine: Buy a big tub of it. If all you can find is capsules, then just open like 10 up into drinks. I would take at least 10-15 grams/day, with meals or in drinks.

 

Collagen: I used VEDApure Fish Collagen, which was a white tasteless powder. Supplements that help your skin look better also seem to help the gut heal more

quickly, in my experience.

 

Prebiotin: Contains Inulin, a prebiotic, which assuming your microbiota isn't very out of balance should be very healing. I used 1-2 scopes/day.

 

Slippery Elm: Buy a bag of it. Never take the capsules in dry form, or they'll open up in your stomach and massively irritate it (been there, done that). Instead, premix it with hot water into an oatmeal like gruel. You can add some honey and licorice extract for flavor. This will help coat the stomach lining and reduce pain/irritation. It has a lot of fiber so go slow with it at first. If you're really in pain, definitely try Slippery Elm first.

 

Other supplements/foods to try: GastraZyme ("vitamin U"), vitamin A, vitamin E, cabbage juice/extract, amino acid formulas (Protexid), foods containing collagen.

 

Be sure to stay very hydrated, because mucous is mostly water. It's super easy to be dehydrated and not know it, so keep drinking water until the peeing gets somewhat annoying. Keep stress low so your body can heal your stomach as quickly as possible.

 

Healing can take weeks to several months, depending on the level of damage. Once you're healed, you can start tapering off Prilosec. You must taper - don't stop cold turkey or you risk damaging your stomach again from the acid rebound effect. Acid rebound is real and you must respect it. Look at it like "rebooting" the acid secretion/regulation system in your stomach.

 

You want to turn on those proton pumps slowly, over time, and carefully listen to your body to make sure your stomach is ready to handle the acid. If you're taking 40mg, it should be safe to immediately drop to 20mg because the difference in acid reduction is minimal between 20mg and 40mg. 

 

To taper down from 20mg, you want to "dither" the dose, slowly reducing it over time. First, on odd days, take 15mg, and on even days take 20mg. Do this for at least a few days. Then switch to a constant 15mg for a few days. Then switch between 15/10mg, etc. 

 

Ideally, get yourself a pill cutter, and get the Prilosec tablets that are easily cut into pieces. Make yourself a bunch of 5mg pieces. Cut 20mg tablets in half and add 5mg to make 15mg. If your Prilosec pills contain a lot of little beads, then open the capsule onto a plate and cut the piles in half as best as you can multiple times.

 

If you get any pain while tapering, you went too quickly, or the tissues in your stomach/esophagus aren't healed enough yet. Immediately quench the acid using tums or baking soda and put the dose back up. The key dose to watch for symptoms is around 10mg.

 

After healing and getting off Prilosec, you still should take it very easy with your diet for several months. Keep fast acting antacids (such as baking soda or tums) on hand for any mishaps. Treat your stomach with respect, because the acid it can secrete is strong enough to dissolve metal.


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#2 Raw015

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 09:25 AM

what about the lactose intolerant like me, can i still use colostrum? 



#3 PD85

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 01:47 PM

what about the lactose intolerant like me, can i still use colostrum? 

 

Pure colostrum can contain very, very low levels of residual lactose. 


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"I could be wrong about everything." -Me


#4 Raw015

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 02:45 PM

 

Pure colostrum can contain very, very low levels of residual lactose. 

 

thankyou im gonna give it a try still have a box laying around from the brand 21st Century.



#5 Raw015

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 12:17 PM

which did you treat first, gastritis or sibo?







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