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Intestinal gas affecting brain functionality?


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#21 hsy

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 01:37 PM

the theory that it's toxins that the liver can't handle is directly contradicted by what eric posts aboveeric do you have said condition re brain fog?

#22 eric

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 09:38 PM

The term brain fog can have different meanings to different people. But yes I get this sometimes. The HPA axis I mentioned helps to fight pathogens or toxins. So it will be activated with a pathogen, a toxin or the fight or flight or stress or ANY THREAT to the organism or person. IT also helps regulate hormones and a lot of body functions and is connected to the immune system.There can be a ton of reasons for brain fog, many people with CFS or Fibro also have it as well as Adrenal burnout, which again is part of the HPA axis. Nutritional problems can certainly be a problem if someone is not eating right. Stress as mentioned can majorally effect the brain and cognitive functioning also through the HPA axis I mentioned.Blood flow can also be a problem. Sleep can be a problemA chronic condition such as IBS, but there are others.Fatique is a major one. Hormones regulation as well as menopause.I am sure I am missing a lot more.But gas in the bowel cannot directly cause brain fog, unless its by stimulating the colon and neurotransmission or other chemicals. I would have to see more on Dr Pimentel's theory. I doubt he thinks brain fog has one and only one cause, because as I mentioned above there are a lot of well known reasons already. I think personally I would start with eating right and sleeping right and stress reductions and recharging the batteries and then see how I felt and if those things helped.Also as mentioned CFS and Fibro are seen in a lot of IBSers and vice versa, so even that could be connected to some people. That IBS can cause brain fog as the central nervous system and autonomic nervous systems as well as the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems are effected doesn't surprize me at all. There is also IBS research on the brain and blood flow, which is different then normals or people with UC.Pain is also another issue to brain fog.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#23 eric

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 09:44 PM

I was thinking about this more, but what toxins are we talking about here. We talking about a real a liver problem?"Toxins" from SIBO?I am not sure where the toxins are suppose to be coming from?
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

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#24 hsy

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 10:07 PM

the toxins are theoretically being produced by bacteria that aren't supposed to be there - we know that the gas in generala is a byproduct of bacteria - unwelcome bacteria would be producing gas that is not native to that environment - i think they call them mycotoxins - can't recall - said toxins would then end up in the bloodstream (which eric you say i think is not possible? can't recall) and traveling to the liver - i read that xifaxan is also used to help people with liver problems because their systems cannot filter the toxins which oftentimes results in hepatic encephelopathy - h.e. symptoms seem to completely match what i experience with this brain fog - i have spent years obsessed with sleep and eating right trying to make this go away and it is linked to the gas - when the gas passes, which sometimes takes days, the effects pass

#25 hsy

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 10:32 PM

mycotoxin is definitely wrong term - they are byproduct of fungi - left over from my travels through the whole candida modality which i do not buy at all at this point

#26 eric

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 11:42 PM

There is altered gas dynamics in IBS and gas distends the bowel and then it releases neurotransmitters, importantly serotonin, which signals sensations to the brain, but also intiates gut contractions, from pressure sensitive cells that release serotonin. IBSers effectively demonstrate altered serotonin dysregulation.altered serotonin signaling and ibs compilationhttp://www.ibsgroup....showtopic=80198Basically if the bowel was not distended like an inflated ballon and was a non inflated ballon and you cut it with a knife the person would not feel it. another part to this perhaps is the connection to the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve connects the gut brain and brain and when stimulated can cause brain fog, but usally also other symptoms, perhaps nausea as well. But another thing to look into, the gas could effect the vagus nerve indirectly, via communications between the gut brain and the brain.FYI hysI asked a major player about this, you might want to read this thread firsthttp://www.ibsgroup....showtopic=68397But for one as Flux pointed out and is something to really consider on this"I mean anything metabolically active produces by-products that they don't want inside them, but usually the normal colon or mouth bacteria aren't generating something that makes people sick (or we would each and every one of us be sick)."But I asked Dr Drossman about the sibo as you can see from the other thread.sorry its in bold type that is how he worte it into the email so I would see it was his answers."IT IS AN OVERSTATEMENT TO SAY THEY ARE "IRRITATING" SUBSTANCES AT LEAST IN THE SENSE OF BEING SOME TYPE OF TOXIN. THEY ARE NATURAL BYPRODUCTS OF DEGRADATION OF FOOD SUBSTANCES BY BACTERIA WHICH DON'T NORMALLY OCCUR IN THE SMALL BOWEL. SO WITH INCREASED BACTERIA IN THE SMALL BOWEL, THE BACTERIA ARE ABLE TO DIGEST SUGARS FOR EXAMPLE PRODUCING H2 AND CO2 FROM THE SUGARS WHICH ARE GASEOUS BUT WHICH ALSO HAVE OSMOTIC PROPERTIES, I.E. INCREASED PARTICLES THAT CAUSE SECRETION OF FLUID INTO THE BOWEL THUS CAUSING DIARRHEA. IT'S THE SAME PRINCIPLE AS USING NON ABSORBABLE SUGARS LIKE LACTULOSE OR SORBITAL TO TREAT CONSIPATION BY INCREASING FLUID IN THE BOWEL. IT'S JUST THAT WITHOUT BACTERIA IN THE SMALL BOWEL, IT DOESN'T HAPPEN AND THE FOOD SUBSTANCES GET ABSORBED. WITH INCREASED BACTERIA IT COMPETES FOR THE FOOD SUBSTANCES AND PRODUCES THE GAS AND DIARRHEA."*This means these are just in the wrong place and not specific or multiple pathogens?*CORRECT. HOWEVER, THERE IS GROWING INTEREST NOT IN THE AMOUNT OF BACTERIA BUT THE TYPE OF BACTERIA. CERTAIN BACTERIA CAN CAUSE SOME MILD INFLAMMATION OF THE BOWEL AND OTHERS PROTECT THE BOWEL FROM THAT POSSIBILITY. SO THERE IS "GOOD" AND "BAD" BACTERIA. POSSIBLY WHEN PEOPLE ARE TREATING PRESUMED SIBO (WHICH MIGHT NOT ACTUALLY BE HAPPENNING, BECAUSE THE TEST MAY BE INACCURATE) ANTIBIOTICS MAY HELP TO GET RID OF THE BAD BACTERIA AND THAT MAY BE WHY THEY ARE GETTING BETTER. THIS IS WHY SOME PEOPLE GET BETTER AFTER ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT. BUT IT CAN ALSO GO THE OTHER WAY, I.E., ANTIBIOTICS HAVE BEEN SHOWN TO MAKE IBS WORSE AS WELL. THE OTHER IDEA IS TO USE PROBIOTICS WHICH CONTAIN "GOOD" BACTERIA (E.G., LACTOBACILLUS OR BIFIDOBACTERIA) WHICH REPLACE THE BAD BACTERIA, POSSIBLY REDUCE THE INFLAMMATION AND IMPROVE SYMPTOMS. SO THE ISSUE OF BACTERIA IN THE BOWEL IS MUCH MORE COMPLICATED THAN SIMPLE SIBO, BUT SIBO CAN BE A PART OF THE WHOLE PICTURE (THOUGH NOT THE WHOLE PICTURE FOR IBS).So its not toxins really. Of course were also not seeing the two pages in Dr P's book at the moment either on the liver and toxins, but here the small bowel and substances in the wrong place.But in IBS there can be altered gas dynamics as matter ferments longer, because of altered motility through the intestines, whcih can also create gas pockets. But altered motility alone does not expalin IBS.There is this also hsy, just for the infoUnderstanding Intestinal Gas Everybody has gas in his or her digestive tract (the esophagus, stomach, small intestine/bowel, and large intestine/bowel). What is happening that causes painful or uncomfortable symptoms associated with gas in some persons while not in others? Report from this 2005 IFFGD Research Award Winner.Topics: Bacteria, gut flora, Diet, Foods, Fact Sheet, Gas, Bloating, Belching, Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Click on the free pdf link. Its a very good article on gas.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#27 eric

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 11:58 PM

On another point, anxiety and depression is seen in a lot of IBSers, especially anxiety and anxiety or panic and in more severe cases depression can also cause brain fog.I know also when my IBS was very severe I would often be depressed and have anxiety over the IBS itself, but another aspect was like working and have my brain was on my job and the other half trying to keep my IBS under control or if it was acting up, it would be letting my mind know it. At other times I notice that my bodies chemicals and hence my nervous systems are out of whack and it does effects my brain. But I also know my gut will effect my brain and my brain (thoughts and emotions) will effect my gut.Pain itself is another aspect in IBS and brain fog as well.
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I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#28 eric

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 12:28 AM

Just for the info on IBS and the brain"Neuroimaging has provided evidence of physiological differences between normal individualsand those suffering from IBS in the way a visceral stimulus (ie, rectal distention) is processed inthe brain.[14,15] Initial data from positron emission tomography (PET) scans demonstratedincreased activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) among normal individuals, comparedto IBS patients. The ACC is a cerebral cortical area that is rich in opiate receptors and is thoughtto be a major component of cognitive circuits relating to perception as well as descending spinalpathways involving pain. More recently, fMRI was used to demonstrate increased activity in theACC, prefrontal (PF), and insular cortex areas, and in the thalamus of IBS patients compared tonormal individuals."Posted ImageandfmriPosted ImagePosted ImageThe prefrontal cortex there has a lot to do with anxiety. Also the Anterior Cingulate Cortex, helps process pain and also emotions. Karoe, do you feel faint when it happens, tired, nausea, not thinking clearly, how do you actually feel when you get this? That it comes on at a certain time of the day, might be connected to your bodies natural cycles and rhythms.FYI"The twenty four hour cycle that our bodies work on is known as a circadian rhythm. “Circadian” is a Latin word which means, ‘about a day’. (“How Biological Clocks Work”). On Earth, our biological clock runs on a twenty-four hour cycle because a significant piece of it is triggered by simple daylight. Light from the sun passes through our eyes and is detected by nerves in the retina, which is a sensitive area at the back of the eye. These nerves pass a signal along to the brain. “Some of these nerves feed the hypothalamus, which is a part of the brain that regulates body temperature, water, sugar ratios, and also fluid secretions. It houses the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which is a bundle of nerves that controls the body’s circadian rhythms” (“Jet Lag”). This also explains why circadian rhythms affect body temperature. The temperature of our bodies rises during the day, drops in the middle of the night, and begins to rise again in the early morning (“Jet Lag”). "http://library.think.../bioClocks.htmlalso yet again this is connected to the hypothalamus and hence the Hpa axis. Certain chemicals rise and fall in people during the day. An important one is cortisol and it is highest early in the morning and starts to decline later in the day and is really low after were asleep. When it starts to wear off after the early mornings into the afternoon, we get sleepy, fatiqued and perhaps irritable and can't think quite as clearly. It also helps us wake up in the morning and is connected with d in people with IBS and is one reason why some people have d really bad in the mornings.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#29 hsy

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 12:58 AM

eric thank you for this information it is very very interesting and i will be taking it to my doctor in nyc in the next 10 dayswhen i have information to add, i most certainly willbesthsy

#30 eric

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 11:05 AM

hsy, you don't happen to go to the mind body digestive center in NY do you?I am from NY, but live out west now.I lived across from west point on the Hudson river in the hudson highlands about an hour north of the city.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#31 hsy

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 11:25 AM

no i don't - i went to a top holistic md for a while and after spending many thousands of dollars with minor results (and major oversights on their part) i decided to call quintron and get a referral for a real gastro in manhattan (where i live) - so far i am happy with the doctor's professionalism and thoroughness

#32 eric

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 12:14 PM

Hsy, glad you found a caring doctor that is a plus.Just so you know though, this center specializes in IBS in New York.The Mind-Body Digestive Centerhttp://www.mindbodydigestive.com/There is also some helpful info on their site to read.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#33 eric

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 11:56 AM

FYI"The 'brain-gut axis' helps to explain the influence that thoughts, emotions, and psychological or social stress have on the function of the gut.""The Gut Speaks BackWhile the brain influences the digestive system, the opposite also is true. As stressful events can trigger digestive symptoms, so too can gastrointestinal disorders trigger stress, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms.Symptoms of a long-standing or recurring gastrointestinal disorder can be very intrusive, and can affect a person's daily life. Sadly, many sufferers can become preoccupied with their symptoms and how they might affect their day. As a result, they may find it difficult to concentrate on their normal activities and even suffer headaches, fatigue, and depression. These effects may be thought of as complications of the gastrointestinal disorder. We also know that patients who have ulcers and other inflammation of the bowel, such as with ulcerative colitis, may feel depressed and fatigued when the disease is active. This is because the bowel disease releases chemicals that go to the brain and produce these emotional consequences."Understanding the Causes of SymptomsAlthough there is a clear connection between psychological and digestive health, people with IBS and other gastrointestinal disorders often don't comprehend a link between psychosocial stress and their GI symptoms.http://www.merck.com...2/braingut.html
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#34 eric

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 12:16 PM

only have a copy of this and its from 96' and I could not find an actual link, however they have learned a lot more since then, but Complex and Hidden Brain in Gut Makes Bellyaches.. « on: January 10, 2007, 11:46:04 am » --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Complex and Hidden Brain in Gut Makes Bellyaches and ButterfliesEver wonder why people get "butterflies" in the stomach before going on stage ? Or why an impending job interview can cause an attack of intestinal cramps ? And why antidepressant s targeted for the brain cause nausea or abdominal upset in millions of people who take such drugs ?The reason for these common experiences, scientists say, is that the body has two brains - the familiar one encased in the skull and a lesser known but vitally important one found in the human gut Like Siamese twins, the two brains are interconnected ; when one gets upset, the other does, too.The gut's brain, known as the enteric nervous system, is located in sheaths of tissue lining the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon. Considered a single entity, it is a network of neurons, neurotransmitt ers and proteins that zap messages between neurons, support cells like those found m the brain proper and a complex circuitry that enables it to act independently, learn, remember and, as the saying goes, produce gut feelings.The brain in the gut plays a major role in human happiness and misery. But few people know it exists, said Dr. Michael Gershon, a professor of anatomy and cell biology at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New-York. For years, people who had ulcers, problems swallowing or chronic abdominal pain were told that their problems were imaginary, emotional, simply all in their heads. Dr. Gershon said. They were shuttled to psychiatrists for treatment.Doctors were right in ascribing these problems to the brain. Dr. Gershon said, but they blamed the wrong one. Many gastro-intestmal disorders like colids and irritable bowel syndrome originate from problems within the gut's brain, he said. And the current wisdom is that most ulcers are caused by a bacterium, not by hidden anger at one's mother.Symptoms stemming from the two brains get confused. Dr. Gershon said. "Just as little brain can upset the gut, the gut can also upset the brain" he said. "If you were chained to the toilet with cramps, you'd be upset too."Details of how tlie enteric nervous system mirrors the central nervous system have been emerging in recent years, said Dr. Gershon, who is considered one of a new field of medicine called neurogastroent erology.Nearly every substance that helps run and control the brain has turned up in the gut. Dr. Gershon said. Major neurotransmitt ers like serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, norepinephrine and nitric oxide are there. Two dozen small brain proteins, called neuropepddes, are in the gut, as are major cells of the immune system. Enkephalins, one class of the body's natural opiates, are in the gut And in a finding that stumps researchers, the gut is a rich source of benzodiazepine s - the family of psychoacrive chemicals that includes such ever popular drugs as Valium and Xanax.In evolutionary terms, it makes sense that the body has two brains, said Dr. David Wingate, a professor of gastrointestin al science at the University of London and a consultant at tlie Royal London Hospital. The first nervous systems were intubular animals that stuck to rocks and waited for food to pass by. Dr. Wingate said. The limbic system is often referred to as the "reptile brain".As life evolved, animals needed a more complex brain for finding food and sex and so developed a central nervous system. But the gut's nervous system was too important to put inside the newborn head with long connections going down to the body. Dr. Wingate said. O-ffsprmg need to eat and digest food at birth. Therefore, nature seems to have preserved the enteric nervous system as independant circuit. Inside higher animals, it is only loosely connected to the central nervous system and can mostly function alone, without insructions from topside.This is indeed the picture seen bydevelopmenta l biologists. A clump of tissue called the neural crest forms early in emblyogenesis. Dr. Gershon said. One section turns into the central nervous system. Another piece migrates to become the enteric nervous system. Only later arte the two nervous systems connected via a cable called the vagus nerve.Untill relatively recently, people thought that the gut's muscles and sensory nerves were vyired directly to the brain and that the brain controlled the gut through two pathways that increased or decreased rates of activity. Dr. Wingate said. The gut was simply a tube with simples reflexes. Trouble is, no one bothered to count the nerve fibers in the gut. When they did, he said, they were surprised to find that the gut contains 100 million neurons - more that the spinal cord has. Yet the vagus nerve only sends a couple of thousand nerve fibers to the gut.The brain sends signals to the gut by talking to a small number of "command neurons", which in turn send signals to gut intemeurons that cany messages up and down the pike. Dr. Gershon said. Both command neurons and interneurons are spread throughout two layers of gut tissue called the myenteric plexus and the subrnuscosal plexus. ("Solar plexus" is actually a boxing term that refers simply to nerves in the abdomen.) Command neurons control the pattern of activity in the gut. Dr. Gershon said. The vagus nerve only alters the volume by changing its rate of firing.The plexuses also contain glial cells that nourish neurons, mast cells involved in immune responses, and a "blood brain barrier" that keeps harmful substances away from important neurons. Dr. Gershon said. They have sensors for sugar, protein, acidity and other chemical factors that might monitor the progress of digestion, determining how the gut mixes and propels its contents. "It's not a simple pathway", he said. "It uses complex integrated circuits not unlike those found in the brain."The gut's brain and the head's brain act the same way when they are deprived of input from the outside world. Dr. Wingate said. During sleep, the head's brain produces 90-minute cycles of slow wave sleep punctuated by periods of rapid eye movement sleep in which dreams occur. During the night, when it has no food, the gut's brain produces 90-minute cycles of slow wave muscle contractions punctuated by short bursts of rapid muscle movements. Dr. Wingate said.The two brains may influence each other while in this state. Dr. Wingate said. Patients with bowel problems have been shown to have abnormal REM sleep. This finding is not inconsistent with the folk wisdom that indigestion can produce nightmare.As light is shed oA the circuitly between the two brains, researchers are beginning to understand why people act and feel the way they do. When the central brain encounters a frightening situation, it releases stress hormones that prepare the body to fight or flee. Dr. Gershon said. The stomach contains many sensory nerves that are stimulated by this chemical surge - hence the "butterflies". On the battlefield, the higher brain tells the gut brain to shut down. Dr. Gershon said. "A frightened, running animal does not stop to defecate", he said.Fear also causes the vagus nerve to "turn up the volume" on serotonin circuits in the gut. Dr. Gershon said. Thus overstimulated, the gut goes into higher gear and diarrhea results. Similarly, people sometimes "choke" with emotion. When nerves in the oesophagus are highly stimulated, people have trouble swallowing.Even the so-called "Maalox moment" of advertising fame can be explained by the two brains interacting, said Dr. Jackie D. Wood, chairman of the department of physiology at Ohio State University in Columbus. Stress signals from the head's brain can alter nerve function between the stomach and oesophagus, resulting in heartburn.In cases of extreme stress. Dr. Wood said, the higher brain seems to protect the gut by sending signals to immunological mast cells in the plexus. The mast cells secrete histamine, prostaglandin and other agents that help produce inflammation, he said. "This is protective. If an animal is in danger and subject to trauma, dirty stuff in the intestines is only a few cells away from the rest of the body. By inflaming the gut, the brain is priming the gut for surveillance. If the barrier breaks, the gut is ready to do repairs". Dr. Wood said. Unfortunately, the chemicals that get released also cause diarrhea and cramping.Such cross talk also explains many drug interactions. Dr. Gershon said. "When you make a drug to have psychic effects on the brain, it's veiy likely to have an effect on the gut that you didn't think about", he said. Conversely, drugs developped for the brain could have uses in the gut.For example, the gut is loaded with neurotransmitt er serotonin. When pressure receptors in the gut's lining are stimulated, serotonin is released and starts the reflexive motion of peristalsis. Dr. Gershon said.Now a quarter of people taking Prozac or similar antidepressant s have gastrointestma l problems like nausea, diarrhea and constipation, he said. These drugs act on serotonin, preventing its uptake by target cells so that it remains more abundant in the central nervous system.In a study to be published soon. Dr. Gershon and his colleagues explain Prozac's side effects ont the gut. They mounted a section of guinea pig colon on a stand and put a small pellet in the "mouth" end. The isolated colon whips the pellet down to the "anal" end of the column, just as it would inside an animal. Dr. Gershon said.When the researchers put a small amount of Prozac into the colon, the pellet "went into high gear". Dr. Gershon said. The drug doubled the speed at which the pellet passed through the colon, which would explain why some people get diarrhea. Prozac as been used in small doses to treat chronic constipation, he said.But when researchers increased the amount of Prozac in the guinea pig colon, the pellet stopped moving. The colon froze up. Dr. Gershon said, which is why some people get constipated on the drug. And because Prozac stimulated sensory nerves, he said, it can also cause nausea.Some antibiotics like crythromycin act on gut receptors to produce oscillations. Dr. Gershon said. People experience cramps and nausea. Drugs like morphine and heroin attach to the gut's opiate receptors, producing constipation. Indeed, both brains can be addicted to opiates.Victims of AIzheimer's and Parkingson's diseases suffer from constipation. The nerves in their gut are as sick as the nerve cells in their brains.Just as the central brain affects the gut, the gufs brain can talk back to the head. Dr. Gershon said. Most of the gut sensations that enter conscious awareness are negative things like pain and bloatedness. Dr. Wingate said. People do not expect to feel anything good from the gut but that does not mean such signals are absent, he said.Hence, the intriguing question : why does the human gut produce benzodiazepine 7 The human brain contains receptors for benzodiazepine, a drug that relieves anxiety, suggesting that the body produces its own internal source of the drug, said Dr. Anthony Basile, a neurochemist in the Neuroscience Laboratory at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. Several years ago, he said, an Italian scientist made a startling discovery. Patients with their liver failure fall into a deep coma. The coma can be reversed, in minutes, by giving the patient a drug that blocks benzodiazepine .When the liver falls, substances usually broken down by the liver get to the brain. Dr. Basile said. Some are bad, like ammonia and mercaptans, which are "smelly compounds that skunks spray on you", he said. But a series of compounds are also identical to benzodiazepine . "We don't know if they come from gut itself, from bacteria in the gut or from food". Dr. Basile said. But when the liver falls, the gut's benzodiazepine goes straight to the brain, knocking the patient unconscious.The payoff for exploring gut and head brain interactions is enormous. Dr. Wood said. For example, many people are allergic to certain foods, like shellfish. This is because mast cells in the gut mysteriously become sensitized to antigens in the food. The next time the antigen shows up in the gut. Dr. Wood said ; the mast cells call up a program, releasing chemical modulators that try to eliminate the threat. The allergic person gets diarrhea and cramps, he said.Many autoimmune diseases like Krohn's disease and ulcerative colitis may involve the gut's brain. Dr. Wood said. The consequences can be horrible, as in Chagas disease, which is caused by a parasite found in South America. Those infected develop an autoimmune response to neurons in their gut. Dr. Wood said. Their immune systems slowly destroy their own gut neurons. When enough neurons die, the intestines literally explode.A big question remains. Can the gut's brain learn 7 Does it "think" for itself 7 Dr. Gershon tells a story about an old Army sergeant, a male nurse in charge of a group ofparaplegics. With their lower spinal cords destroyed, the patients would get impacted."The sergeant was anal compulsive". Dr. Gershon said. "At 10 A.M. eveiyday, the patients got enemas. Then the sergeant was rotated off the ward. His replacement decided to give enemas only after compactions occured. But at 10 the next morning, everyone on the ward had a bowel movement at the same time, without enemas". Dr. Gershon said. Had the sergeant trained those colons?The human gut has long been seen as a repositoiy of good and bad feelings. Perhaps emotional states from the head's brain are mirrored in the gut's brain, were they are felt by those who pay attention to them.The "brain in the gut" takes the form of two networks of neural connections in the lining of the gastrointestin al tract, called the myenteric plexus and the subrnucosal plexus. The nerves are highly interconnected and have direct influence on things like the speed of digestion, the movement and secretions of the finger-like mucosa that line the intestines and the contractions of the different kinds of muscle in the gut wall. [Diagram # 1]GUT-BRAIN HIGHWAY: A 2-WAY STREET:The gut has a mind of its own, the enteric nervous system. Just like the larger brain in the head, researchers say, this system sends and receives impulses, records and experiences and responds to emotions. Its nerve cells are bathed and influenced by the same nerotransmitte rs. The gut can upset the brain just as the brain can upset the gut. [Diagram #2]Diagram of wall of small intestine, with layers cut away to show two networks of nerves that make up enteric nervous system, or "brain in the gut". One network, called the subrnucosal plexus, is just under the mucosal lining. One, the myenteric plexus, lies between two coats of muscle. [Diagram # 3]Sandra BLAKESLEE,The New York Times, Januaiy 23rd, 1996.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#35 hsy

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 10:52 AM

tested positive for SIBO/hydrogen via breath testingput on 1200mg xifaxan dailyabove course halted after positive test for blastocystisnow on 500 mg flagyl 2xday 7 days

#36 karoe

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 01:34 PM

HSY -- please keep posting about this treatment --- I'm very interested in what happens. Had you not had a test for parasites before??? Generally that's one of the first things they do.

#37 eric

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Posted 03 November 2007 - 12:50 AM

HysThe doctor doing the testing was a regular gi doc yes?Do you know if it was a lactulose breath test?Its important to know that breath testing is not very accurate, some more then others even. So you may or may not have sibo still, its hard to diagnose and there are variables. Also if I remember correctly sibo is another functional problem, like IBS. Things don't function right and that leads to SIBO. Also IBS could still be on the table. Some of the conditions can mimick some IBS symptoms or a person can have IBS and SIBO. Or maybe not have IBS. But can you read this link? I point this out for a number of reasons including the diagnoses and treatment suggestions for sibo, as well as other very important points to a bigger picture.http://www.annals.or...print/145/8/626and on thisCenters for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Infectious DiseasesDivision of Parasitic DiseasesBlastocystis hominis Infection(BLASS-toe-SIS-tiss HOM-in-iss)Clinical Features:Whether Blastocystis hominis can cause symptomatic infection in humans is a point of active debate. This is because of the common occurrence of the organism in both asymptomatic and symptomatic persons. Those who believe symptoms could be related to infection with this parasite have described a spectrum of illness including watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, perianal pruritus, and excessive flatulence.The first link goes into this in more detail.http://www.cdc.gov/n...tis_hominis.htmTreatment:Despite the controversial clinical significance of this organism, metronidazole or iodoquinol has been reported to be effective. For additional information, see the recommendations in The Medical Letter (Drugs for Parasitic Infections).http://www.dpd.cdc.g...lastocystis.htm
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#38 hsy

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Posted 15 December 2007 - 03:15 PM

thanks for everyone's posts - i am amazed by the amount of views on this topichere is my current status:most recent treatment was 10 days of 1200mg xifaxan which was halted when i tested pos for blasto and put on flagyl - completed course of flagyl then completed course of xifaxanthis was 6-8 weeks or so ago - around this time i felt like i had been cured for the first time - truly - clear head, depression gone, didn't wake up everyday feeling like i didn't sleep for even 5 mins, like there was tar in my brain - i was ecstatic and felt like i could finally begin living my life and not hiding and waiting for the fog to pass - i was seriously infectiously happy for the first time in years, and so hopefulover the past i would say 3 weeks, things have rapidly declined - conditions are the following: i am in an extremely high stress work situation, when i started feeling better i started eating things i hadn't eaten in years (wheat, cookies, things like that), and i CAN overdo it sometimes, it was all part of feeling better and like i had been cured, i figured i could eat normally, thanksgiving was in this time as well and i actually let myself do the american thanksgiving overeating thing (for the first time in 10 years prob)it takes me a week or so of being really depressed (about not being able to think clearly) and trying to sleep around the clock before i realize that it's not a sleep problem and that it's the digestion again, i have a therapist who helps me parse thisi keep a very irregular schedule in general (i do creative work and work when inspired as much as possible), so it's hard to tell what contributes to whatthe first clue that it was not the sleep making me feel out of it was when i started noticing a bit of mucus on my stool - over the last year i have learned that that SEEMS to accompany dairy ingestion which i avoid like the plague - i had been having terrible gas and could not trace it - at that point i started rummaging through my cupboards and discovered that a package of pepperidge farm cookies, which i bought because they were dark chocolate and not milk chocolate, did in fact still have milk it themi do believe that there was a period of constipation in that timeframe since i felt great - at that stage i never have any idea whether i am supposed to eat or not eat - i have read information supporting both - my doctor says more than anything fluids are the answer so i am going to try drinking like 5 litres of water and eating light when i become constipated moving forwardi am meeting with a nutritionist next week referred by my gastro - i am also calling gastro on monday to report that my head feels like it's nonfunctional and that i can barely function in the real world againthat's the updatei am hopeful based on recent improvements but frustrated by return of symptoms - and i never know if maybe they will just go away once the gas passes but it seems like im back on the merry go round - eat or not - eat what - which ibs modality suits my situation? lots of refined grains so as not to create too much gas? or do those refined grains feed the bacteria? or lots of plants/veggies - which pimentel says ALSO feed the bacteria - what a disaster this situation is . . .more to comealways appreciate the feedback posted here - i wasn't receiving notifications so i didn't know there had been replies - naturally once i start feeling bad again i start googling which always leads me back here -GROUNDHOG DAY!also - a few questions were asked:1. never been tested for parasites before - i have had the privilege thus far of seeing the worst doctors on the planet, for nearly 10 years, who basically all made me feel like i was nuts and that my problem was 'stress' - all of this landed me in therapy which landed me with a proper gastro2. sibo test was a breath test, yes - i got my gastro by getting a manhattan referral from quintron so it was a quintron lactulose test which reported moderate SIBO (dual peak? i think that's what it's called can't recall)

#39 eric

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 02:23 PM

HSYjust fyiVideo CornerThe Experts SpeakAt IFFGD's 7th International Symposium on Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in April 2007, we had the opportunity to talk to some of the international experts in functional GI disorders. Our discussions covered some of the most recent developments in this field. Click the topic titles below to go to the video interviews!Video Corner: Gut Flora, Probiotics and AntibioticsBacteria are germs that are normally in the gut. They are often referred to as the gut flora. Most bacteria are in the large intestine (colon). Some bacteria can cause infection; these are called pathogens. Other bacteria can be helpful. These helpful (or “good”) bacteria are called probiotics. Medicines that destroy bacteria are called antibiotics.During IFFGD's 7th International Symposium on Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in April 2007, we had the opportunity to interview a leading researcher, Dr. Eamonn Quigley, on the topics of probiotics and antibiotics.http://www.aboutibs....corner/gutfloraIts important also that the sibo lactulose breath test can be inaccurate. Its also not likely anymore that SIBO is a "cause" of IBS, but that some people have one or the other or both.These are more videos on IBShttp://www.aboutibs....r/video-corner/
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#40 eric

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 02:32 PM

PS"which i bought because they were dark chocolate and not milk chocolate, did in fact still have milk it them"There probably is not enough lactulose in that to make a difference really. Your body produces an enzyme to break down lactulose. When a person uses up that enzyme and has latulose intolernce then it becomes a problem, but that usally requires about a half cup to a cup, before its an issue.Another problem for some might be people who have a type of allergy to diary, but this is a different issue then latulose intolerence.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.





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