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Intestinal gas affecting brain functionality?


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#41 hsy

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 04:58 PM

problem went away after i stopped eating the cookies which is strange then

#42 Cillian

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 09:32 PM

Wow I thought that I was the only one having these issues :( . I just quit smoking a month and a half ago and had attributed it to that though. I also have been feeling this kind of cloud come over me every now and again(although this past week its been almost every day). I recently had an upper and lower scope performed by a specialist, but had not met the doctor before the procedure. A couple weeks after I had them done I went in to see him and brought with me a list of my symptoms which included: lots of gas, slight confusion and that my girlfriend had reported that my eyes look bloodshot sometimes. Also when she comments that they are bloodshot it is when I am feeling this sort of drunken state. I will only get like this after a couple days of low activity which leads to gas building up inside me. I know for me that I can feel better by exercising and eating foods I know are good. Also one food that really seams to help me is chilli, the kidney beans in it are high in fiber and also magnesium which both seem to help with the gas issue.
My Symptoms: Ibs C/D/Gas, Lactose Intolerance, Fructose Intolerance, Gerd.

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 11:49 AM

HSY - I am experiencing exactly the same symptoms as you. It seems to be worse when I eat fermentable carbohydrates such as broccoli and beans - and I cannot touch probiotics/prebiotics. I used to be able to tolerate them in the past - up until a year and a half ago, but now they make me feel very ill and it will take me a week to recover. I have no idea what to do. I had an endoscopy back in March and it showed gastritis. I burp an awful lot and have done since March after a terrible bout of flu, the doctors still don't know what the reason could be for that, but the burping is a slight gerd issue I believe, remnants from gastritis. The main issue though is the gas and subsequent symptoms of brain fog, sore/gritty eyes, funny taste in mouth and puffy hands/face. My blood sugar also seems affected where it seems to go down and I then crave food/sugar. Do you get a strange taste in your mouth sometimes? It's almost as if the by products of fermentation are leaching into my blood stream and lungs.I am trying to set up a business but I am crippled by this infliction, no one seems to have any idea what it could be other than 'an abnormal handling of gas that may be ibs related'.Have you ever taken drugs of any kind - recreational or pharmaceutical? Did you notice a correlation between your symptoms and any courses of antibiotics you may have taken in the past?I have not yet taken a breath test, but I have long suspected SIBO. It is interesting that you felt better having completed a course of antibiotics, do you still think it could be SIBO related? Perhaps the antibiotics course taken was too short?Answers/replies gratefully received, nobody understands how bad this is and how it affects me mentally and physically. I just wish to god I knew what it could be, how it arose and how I can treat it.

#44 hsy

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:18 PM

did a long course of tetracycline for acne in high school - basically a bottomless supply of itdid get a strange taste in my mouth regularly in recent years - the sibo treatment seemed to affect thatand yes re the 'other stuff' although have been 10+ years without any of it at all. including alcohol.

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:28 PM

interesting, and similiardo you think it's still SIBO? are you able to take probiotics?

#46 hsy

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:31 PM

while i was tested for and diagnosed with sibo, so it's sibo. but it's not the whole story. i don't know the whole story yet . . . we'll see what the doctors and nutritionists have to say after a colonoscopy and diet examination etc

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:32 PM

i'm also considering whether there are any chemical changes in the brain due to other stuff. this would affect the autonomic nervous system i believe - and therefore digestion etc. i may look into a brain scan as well, i need to cover all areas, i'm sick to death of not knowing what's wrong. what's your next plan of action -test/treatment wise, if any?

#48 hsy

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:33 PM

see above!

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:33 PM

yeah i'm gonna get colonoscopy done too. please report back any news/updates... cheers

#50 eric

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 07:44 PM

FYII posted this on another thread but figured I would post it here also.""Do people get cured after they have found SIBO? "Sibo is another functional issue, so it might depend on what causes the sibo in the first place. The speculation that sibo causes IBS is not working out so well. So this is a seperate issue some people have along with IBS. SIBO usally causes d.ON IBSaltered serotonin signaling and ibs compilationhttp://www.ibsgroup....showtopic=80198There are two cells in IBS that seem to be very important, enterochromaffin (ec) cells and mast cells.There seems to be different cell pathologies for one in different groups of IBSers. For example there are important cellular changes in Post infection IBS after the resolution of the intial infection.Some of these changes are also seen in IBS and some of the problems are also seem connected.The digestive system is extremely complex and the connections to digestion and the brain are extremly complex. This system works or should work in harmony.This is some excellent up to date Post Infectious IBS info.Post-infectious Irritable Bowel SyndromeRobin Spiller; Eugene Campbell"Recent Findings: Recent studies have overthrown the dogma that irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by no abnormality of structure by demonstrating low-grade lymphocytic infiltration in the gut mucosa, increased permeability and increases in other inflammatory components including enterochromaffin and mast cells. Furthermore, increased inflammatory cytokines in both mucosa and blood have been demonstrated in irritable bowel syndrome. While steroid treatment has proved ineffective, preliminary studies with probiotics exerting an anti-inflammatory effect have shown benefit.Summary: The study of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome has revealed the importance of low-grade inflammation in causing irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. It has suggested novel approaches to irritable bowel syndrome including studies of serotonin and histamine metabolism which may be relevant to other subtypes of of the disease."http://www.medscape....le/518355_printenterochromaffin or EC cells store the majority of serotonin in the gut. They are pressure sensitive and release serotonin to start gut contractions. Mast cells release histimine.Here is a picture of where those cells are located.Posted ImageThe 5ht3 receptors are involved in D IBS and the 5ht4 receptors C IBS.I will post more on the mast cells because they are also very important.More on the enterochromaffin cells and IBS and serotoninAliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Apr 15;23(8):1067-76. LinksReview article: intestinal serotonin signalling in irritable bowel syndrome.Mawe GM, Coates MD, Moses PL.Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT 05405, USA. [email protected] in motility, secretion and visceral sensation are hallmarks of irritable bowel syndrome. As all of these aspects of gastrointestinal function involve serotonin signalling between enterochromaffin cells and sensory nerve fibres in the mucosal layer of the gut, potential alterations in mucosal serotonin signalling have been explored as a possible mechanism of altered function and sensation in irritable bowel syndrome. Literature related to intestinal serotonin signalling in normal and pathophysiological conditions has been searched and summarized. Elements of serotonin signalling that are altered in irritable bowel syndrome include: enterochromaffin cell numbers, serotonin content, tryptophan hydroxylase message levels, 5-hydroxyindoleacedic acid levels, serum serotonin levels and expression of the serotonin-selective reuptake transporter. Both genetic and epigenetic factors could contribute to decreased serotonin-selective reuptake transporter in irritable bowel syndrome. A serotonin-selective reuptake transporter gene promoter polymorphism may cause a genetic predisposition, and inflammatory mediators can induce serotonin-selective reuptake transporter downregulation. While a psychiatric co-morbidity exists with IBS, changes in mucosal serotonin handling support the concept that there is a gastrointestinal component to the aetiology of irritable bowel syndrome. Additional studies will be required to gain a more complete understanding of changes in serotonin signalling that are occurring, their cause and effect relationship, and which of these changes have pathophysiological consequences.PMID: 16611266Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2007 Aug;19 Suppl 2:25-31. LinksRecent advances in understanding the role of serotonin in gastrointestinal motility in functional bowel disorders: alterations in 5-HT signalling and metabolism in human disease.Spiller R.Professor of Gastroenterology, Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, Nottingham, UK. [email protected] (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is present in abundance within the gut, most stored in enterochromaffin cell granules. It is released by a range of stimuli, most potently by mucosal stroking. Released 5-HT stimulates local enteric nervous reflexes to initiate secretion and propulsive motility. It also acts on vagal afferents altering motility and in large amounts induces nausea. Rapid reuptake by a specific transporter (serotonin transporter, SERT) limits its diffusion and actions. Abnormally increased 5-HT is found in a range of gastrointestinal disorders including chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, carcinoid syndrome, coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhoea (IBS-D), especially that developing following enteric infection. Impaired SERT has been described in IBS-D and might account for some of the increase in mucosal 5-HT availability. 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists inhibit chemotherapy-induced nausea and diarrhoea associated with both carcinoid syndrome and IBS. While IBS-D is associated with increased 5-HT postprandially, IBS with constipation (IBS-C) is associated with impaired 5-HT response and responds to 5-HT(4) agonists such as Prucalopride and 5-HT(4) partial agonists such as Tegaserod.PMID: 17620085Another very important cell in IBS is the mast cell. You can see where that is located in the picture, they are embedded in the gut wall.Mast cells are involved in fighting infections, allergies and the fight or flight stress responce. They can be activated by the HPA axis or Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The HPA axis has importnt roles in bodily functions, but is also the bodies stress system. The mast cells can degrandulate and release histimine from the mast cells embedded in the gut and this can contribute to pain and D.DR Wood is an expert on food lallergies, but importantly the enteric nervous system and IBS.First from Dr Drossman though.Dr Drossman's comments on foods for IBS Health.Shawn,To say that people with IBS may get symptoms from food intolerances is an acceptable possibility, since the gut will over react to stressors of all types including food (high fat or large volumes of food in particular). Futhermore, there can be specific intolerances. So if you have a lactose intolerance for example, it can exacerbate, or even mimic IBS. Other examples of food substances causing diarrhea would be high consumers of caffeine or alcohol which can stimulate intestinal secretion or with the latter, pull water into the bowel (osmotic diarrhea). The same would be true for overdoing certain poorly absorbed sugars that can cause an osmotic type of diarrhea Sorbitol, found in sugarless gum and sugar substituted foods can also produce such an osmotic diarrhea. Even more naturally, people who consume a large amount of fruits, juices or other processed foods enriched with fructose, can get diarrhea because it is not as easily absorbed by the bowel and goes to the colon where it pulls in water. So if you have IBS, all of these food items would make it worse. However, it is important to separate factors that worsen IBS (e.g., foods as above, stress, hormonal changes, etc.) from the cause or pathophysiology of IBS. Just like stress doesn't cause IBS, (though it can make it worse), foods must be understood as aggravating rather than etiological in nature. The cause of IBS is yet to be determined. However, modern research understands IBS as a disorder of increased reactivity of the bowel, visceral hypersensitivity and dysfunction of the brain-gut axis. There are subgroups being defined as well, including post-infectious IBS which can lead to IBS symptoms. Other work using brain imaging shows that the pain regulation center of the brain (cingulate cortex) can be impaired, as well as good evidence for there being abnormalities in motility which can at least in part explain the diarrhea and constipation. So finding a specific "cause" of IBS has grown out of general interest in place of understanding physiological subgroups that may become amenable to more specific treatments. Hope that helps.Doug http://www.ibshealth...ibs_foods_2.htmhttp://www.ibshealth...bsfoodsinfo.htmDr Wood's comments for me"Dr. Jack Wood, a renowned physiologist at The Ohio State University calls the ENS the little-brain-in-the-gut."Dear Shawn:Sorry for the delayed reply to your question. I generally agree with Dr. Drosssmans response. A subgroup of individuals when they become sensitized to specific molecules in certain foods respond to ingestion of the molecules with symptoms of cramping abdominal pain, fecal urgency and explosive watery diarrhea. These are also the primary symptoms of diarrhea-predominant IBS. Enteric mast cells, by mechanisms we don't understand, become sensitized to the food molecule and respond to its presence by releasing a signal to the brain-in-the-gut (ENS) which is interpreted as a threat. The ENS responds by running a program which organizes secretion and motility into a behavior pattern of the bowel, which rapidly clears the threat from the lumen. Because to be effective secretion occurs in large volumes and the contractions that accomplish rapid propulsion are strong, running of the program has the side effects of diarrhea and cramping pain. Big brain input to mast cells during stress activates the mast cells to evoke the symptoms resulting from exposure of the mast cells to sensitizing food antigens. Aside from food allergens and mast cells, certain chemicals such as those in hot peppers, stimulate sensory nerves in the ENS and we are beginning to understand how this can also lead to food-related symptoms that might mimic or exacerbate IBS.Hope this helps,Jackie (Jack) D. Wood " FYI"You have two brains: one in your head and another in your gut. Dr. Jackie D. Wood is a renowned physiologist at The Ohio State University. He calls the second brain, "the-little-brain-in-the-gut." This enteric nervous system is part of the autonomic nervous system and contains over one hundred million neurons, which is as many as are in the spinal cord. This complex network of nerves lines the walls of the digestive tract form the esophagus all the way down to the colon. This little brain in the gut is connected to the big brain by the vagus nerves, bundles of nerve fibers running from the GI tract to the head. All neurotransmitters, such as serotonin that are found in the brain are also present in the gut.Dr Wood has discovered that this little-brain-in-the-gut has programs that are designed for our protection and which are very much like computer programs. They respond to perceived threats in the same way that the limbic system or the emotional brain does. So the threat of a gastrointestinal infection can activate the program that increases gut contractions in order to get rid of the infection. The symptoms are abdominal cramping and diarrhea. Dr. Wood has determined that a type of cell found in the body and the gut, called the mast cell, is a key to understanding the connection of the big brain in the head with the little-brain-in-the-gut. Mast cells are involved in defense of the body. In response to certain threats or triggers, such as pollen or infection, mast cells release chemicals, such as histamine, that help to fight off the invader. Histamine is one of the chemicals that causes the symptoms of an allergy or a cold. When an infection of the gut occurs, such as food poisoning or gastroenteritis, the mast cells of the gut release histamine. The little-brain-in-the-gut interprets the mast cell signal of histamine release as a threat and calls up a protective program designed to remove the threat at the expense of symptoms: abdominal pain and diarrhea. The brain to mast cell connection has a direct clinical relevance for irritable bowel syndrome and other functional gastrointestinal syndromes. It implies a mechanism for linking allostasis and the good stress response to irritable states (e.g., abdominal pain and diarrhea) of the gut. Mast cells can be activated to release histamine in response to perceived psychological stress, whether the stressor or trigger is consciously perceived or not. So the end result is the same as if an infection activated the program in the-little-brain-in-the-gut: abdominal pain and diarrhea."http://www.parkviewp...nuggets/n5.html This is also very important" whether the stressor or trigger is consciously perceived or not"The inflammation seen in some IBSers is MACROSCOPIC and not 'overt inflammation" which is seen in IBD conditions. Normal testing with IBS will not reveal this, until more powerful microscopes are used on specific cells and tissue.Inflammation CONTRIBUTES to the symptoms.There is another issue with inflammation and IBS however. "But microscopic inflammation cannot be a diagnostic marker for IBS because it does nor typically produce pain in those who have it. All patients with active celiac disease have microscopic inflammation, but a large proportion do not have abdominal pain, and patients with ulcerative colitis who also have microscopic inflammation when compared with patients with IBS seem to have higher pain thresholds."http://www.ibsgroup....showtopic=91184
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#51 eric

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 11:47 PM

FYIBritish Medical Bulletin Irritable bowel syndrome Robin C. Spiller Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, University Hospital, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK "Visceral hypersensitivityVisceral hypersensitivity is a feature in the majority of IBS patients and has been extensively studied using rectal distension, a safe way of inducing abdominal discomfort in such patients. How closely it mimics IBS pain is unknown, since in many cases the pain may well arise because of strong contractions rather than excessive distension. This hypersensitivity is most clearly seen when the patient knows that the distensions will continue to increase until they say that they experience pain. However, when the stimuli are unpredictable, the ability of patients to detect distension does not appear to be better than that of normal subjects, suggesting that most hypersensitivity is due to a ‘response bias’, i.e. a tendency to use pain to describe a lesser sensation than that described by normal subjects.30 This may reflect a conditioned fear of gut stimuli based on previous experience. Recent studies have used functional brain imaging to show increased response to both actual and sham rectal distension in the anterior cingulate cortex,31 an area where the emotional response to afferent signals is registered. Afferent signalling of pain is modulated by descending antinociceptive pathways.32 There is also preliminary evidence that activation of the periaqueductal grey area, where descending antinociceptive pathways may originate, is defective in IBS.31 "http://bmb.oxfordjou...nt/full/72/1/15I have posted a lot of new IBS information. There still is the issue of sibo in those with IBS and if sibo is confirmed the need to treat the sibo and possibly both sibo and IBS.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 05:51 AM

Hey Eric, thank you so much for the info.Unfortunately I dont believe I have IBS as it is currently seen - I have developed this problem over the last few years gradually, until one day last February something seemed to switch.I have a real problem with anything fermentable, brassica vegetables, prebiotics, probiotics, beans etc. It is as though the bacterial fermentation of these foods in my intestines are secreting harmful by-products which are then leached into my bloodstream affecting my whole body. I will get this awful cloud over my head - severe brain fog that I cannot describe, terribly dry/cracked areas on the palms of my hands (mainly around the base of my fingers & crevices in between), I'll also suffer joint/arthritic pain, puffy face and hands, erratic blood sugar...to name but a few symptoms. I am 27 years old.I have also noticed a correlation with symptoms after a cold or bout of flu, where my symptoms are markedly better during the illness as if everything seems to speed up through the tract, but when the cold ends it's as though my digestion grinds to a halt- and my symptoms are increased 10 fold.It all sounds very strange I know, but I have lived with this now for almost a year (and intermittently for a few years prior to this, but not this level of adverse reactions - they were much milder, but still appeared every so often). I also have developed an increasing sensitivity to chemicals, notably artificial fragrances that cause a very strange reaction such as hyperactivity, erratic blood sugar and excessive urniation (as if trying to rid my body of the checmicals).It all seems linked but I don't know how or why. I just hope that one day soon I can discover what the issue is and pray it can be fixed...

#53 eric

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 10:08 PM

Why, have you been to a doctor and what did they say?"I have a real problem with anything fermentable"That is consistent with IBS."prebiotics, probiotics"Aren't really fermentable.while they is such a thing as gut permeablitiy its not quite what you posting here."I have also noticed a correlation with symptoms after a cold or bout of flu, where my symptoms are markedly better during the illness"This can go both ways with IBS, sometimes makes it better and sometimes worse.You may also have other health issues that aren't all related to each other.smells can also set IBS off as well and certain chemicals can trigger it.Many IBSers have bladder issues as well and it has to do with something called mast cells. Which also cause allergic reactions.Actually some of this you mentioned could be consistent with IBS.What has the doctor told you?Do you have d or c?Do you have pain or dicomfort?
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#54 Fullogas

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 01:31 PM

Reading this thread has been great!For months now I've been feeling absolutely horrible. The brain fog has been near unbearable at times, along with the gas and bloating. I don't know which I fall under, D or C because I don't really seem to have either. But I have all the side effects and all the joy that comes with them. I'm especially interested in the role of neurotransmitters and hystamine. I know my diet has been bad the last few months. Tons of stress which led to eating out of a stress response. Far more sugar in the diet than I likely should have these past few months. Now with the holidays, it's not an ideal time to try to correct that. I'm hoping to get the sugars back under control over the next few weeks.I'm going to be seeing my regular doctor tomorrow and may begin going through some of the tests again. In additional to the brain fog and severe gas I've been experiencing heart palpitations regularly the last month or two, and off and on all year. I thought I had a heart condition for the longest time. Glad to know it's probably the IBS.Printed off many of the links to read further and take to my doctor. Thanks for all the information. Nice to know I'm not alone.
Diagnosed Fructose Malabsorption 2008
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But an otherwise nice guy... .

#55 hsy

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 02:22 PM

what i can't wrap my head around is what to and not to eatone of the major ibs sites (non medical) says that we need tons of soluble fiber (in combo with insoluble fiber) because it stablizes gut contractions which solves both constipation AND diarrea - but isn't that high carb? and aren't said carbs sugars that feed bacteria?pimentel says go easy on salads etc - so high carbs feed the bacteria, salad feeds bacteriaso which way do you go?i am seeing a nutritionist tomorrow referred by my gastro in manhattan so we'll see what turns upit really is maddening trying to determine whether it's the food causing the constipation, or something mentaland the depression is horrible - what i hate is when i get better for a week and im like holy ###### im cured and the depression goes away and i start thinking of all the things i want to do and then bam i start getting more and more backed up, then depressed, then i don't realize im depressed until a few days in, and THEN i realize that the thing is back, whatever it isfor me, it's all about the brain fog - i don't care about anything else - the fact that i cannot mentally process things at the rate that i expect to be able to is devastating - affects all interactions with people, my perceptions of those interactions, expectations of myself - awful, awful experience - all leads to anxiety, vicious cycle

#56 Fullogas

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 04:00 PM

hsy:I really appreciate you posting all your medical updates. This has been a years long battle for me as well (8 plus). I've seen every GI Dr. I can in Los Angeles, including Pimentel. I've been told I was positive for SIBO, negative for SIBO, that I had cancer, I had gastritis, it was all in my head, that my depression caused the gut to react, that the gut caused the depression...I too have been told constantly, increase fiber to cure things, increase acidophillus, only to feel worse with each.I've been told everything but how to fix it. I'm convinced my problems begin with reactions to food, then go downhill from there. I test negative to Celiac but wheat is really bad for me, causes tremendous, explosive gas and all kind of problems. Bananas, Hah! They make me wish I could carry a bathroom around with me all day long -- instant brain fog reaction.Like you, I simply do not know what to eat. I only know most of the things I eat make me worse so I'm very curious to hear about your nutritionist. I'm beginning to think there are some people who's systems simply work contrary to what is accepted, that healthy things are not healthy for us.Re: Dr. Pimintel: Went there last year. They said I did not have SIBO and couldn't seem to get me out the door fast enough after the results were in. There was no attempt to figure out anything else as a possibility or to even consider other treatments. As far as I'm concerned, his approach is one note and if you don't fit his profile, don't bother because they seemed to lose interest in me completely because I didn't fit their stats. Extremely disappointing.
Diagnosed Fructose Malabsorption 2008
Gluten Intolerant
But an otherwise nice guy... .

#57 eric

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 02:59 PM

You guys should read this state of the art researchFYIIn PDF format2007 IFFGD Symposium Summary Reporthttp://iffgd.org/pdf...Winter_2007.pdf
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

#58 Fullogas

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:28 PM

Eric:First of all, thanks so much for all your research and for sharing. Thanks also for the link to the site above. I downloaded several pdfs and plan to read them through as well as give them to my doctors. Now if only my partner would read them...The link above does not go to the summary report. I searched the site and could not find the report you mentioned. Did you happen to download it? I'd love to read it.
Diagnosed Fructose Malabsorption 2008
Gluten Intolerant
But an otherwise nice guy... .

#59 hsy

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:43 PM

eric i would appreciate an updated link toothe nutritionist i was seeing advised me to go on a basic diet including 2 eggs every morning, a piece of toast with peanut butter (i used almond butter) and some fruit - in the back of my mind i recalled testing VERY high for egg sensitivity 3 years ago but who knows whether to believe that stuff, and at the time i was eating 4 eggs for breakfast every day, so seems normal that i would be producing antibodies anyhow . . . anyhow, the nutritionist and i just figured we'd establish a baseline diet and just jump right inso per the advice i basically for a week ate that recommended breakfast, doing general salmon and veggies for dinner, then occasionally overeating some vegan cookies or chocolate or the like, sushi also in therethe week of christmas and new years was unbelievably abysmal leading to my post of 12/23my entire system slowed/shut down leading to new years day when everything started moving again - and that was an entire day of using the bathroom and an entire previous week of dizziness, confusion, malaise, depression, woozinesssince then i thought hey maybe the fat in the egg yolks, maybe the almonds in the almond butter, maybe all the bread, who knows - so i switched back to a diet of occasional bread, no eggs, no nuts, usual salad/sandwiches/no dairy, benefiber, VDL#3, and i seem to be stabilized again (even eating organic dark chocolate, vegan cookies and the like)i take the maximum amount of benefiber and tend not to drink less than 1 large bottle of water a day and try for two (not easy!)we'll see how long it lasts . . .

#60 Fullogas

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 09:16 PM

hsy:Fiber heavy diets make my symptoms worse. I avoid wheat products altogether. I find I feel much better without them. Nuts and nut butters of any kind aggravate things as well. I find it hard to believe someone would recommend peanut butter to someone with IBS. We tend to have secondary illnesses and allergies along with the IBS, nuts are usually one of them. I'd avoid them where ever possible.My doctors say I don't have celiacs, but wheat allergies and sensitivities share many of the same symptoms you've describe. I'd avoid wheat for a while, see how you feel.Personally, I'm coming to believe that our modern diets, heavy in sugars and processed ingredients, coupled with stresses on our systems is the chief culprit behind my IBS. If you look at history, humans didn't have to deal with the things we deal with on a daily basis until very recently. I wonder if our bodies have had enough time to adapt. I once read it takes 10,000 years for the body to adapt to things (this was in an article talking about wheat in the diets of eastern Europeans -- I read it because I've read that eastern Europeans and people of eastern European Jewish ancestry were more prone to celiacs. Being both I was interested). I don't know if this is true, but it got me thinking about how much we tolerate today versus just 200 years ago. Not a lot of time to adapt. And think about all the processed crud we eat that didn't exist a mere 50 years ago. No wonder our insides turn sour on us!The more I read the more I'm convinced it's a combination of too-fast, too-complicated lives and too much sugars in our diets.
Diagnosed Fructose Malabsorption 2008
Gluten Intolerant
But an otherwise nice guy... .





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