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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Breakfast: 2 soft boiled eggs with steamed zucchini, green string beans & carrot. Pot of black tea.

Lunch: Salami with salad: carrot, cucumber, olives

Late afternoon: tomato, more salami

Dinner: Steak with steamed zucchini, green beans and carrots.

Only water to drink.

No grains, legumes, dairy or sugar. No high starch vegetables like sweet potato. No soluble fibre vegetables such as pumpkin.

This was my diet on Friday.

Saturday evacuation was 15 minutes, and this is the quickest I've ever experienced. The next day after evacuation I had no gas at all until a very small gas at 4.00 pm, but this was after eating wheat at lunch on Saturday.

My worst evacuation years ago was 4 hours after eating macaroni cheese the previous night, and it still wasn't complete. I'm really starting to doubt the pelvic floor dysfunction theory as a cause of IBS.

This diet is very tough but you only need to follow it for a day or so to see if this cures your IBS. On Saturdays I eat what I want: wheat, sugar - whatever I'm craving. I'm not suggesting anyone else does this - it's just how I cope with this really tough diet. I go back to my proper diet on Sunday.

The diet is a combination Paleo Autoimmune diet, Specific Carbohydrate diet and low FODMAP diet. So it basically excludes all known problem foods for IBS. What this diet is high in is insoluble fibre, the kind that doesn't feed bacteria. Insoluble fibre cures my IBS and the vegetables that I eat are all high in water, so I guess fairly low in fibre, apart from the olives.

It's not animal protein that's constipating, it's the antinutrients from grains etc. I believe Leaky Gas is a genetic sensitivity to the antinutrients in certain agricultural foods and I think this sensitivity is across all IBS types. The sensitivity might or might not be a prelude to autoinflammation or autoimmunity.

Antinutrients inhibit digestion, which causes gas. Dr Pimental authored a study that showed that methane gas causes constipation as it behaves like a neurotransmitter. I think also that digestion gas actually blocks stool and that the stool itself might be gassy and easily broken up. The 15 minute evacuation was basically just 2 lots, all fairly solid.

This is my absolute best, default diet. If I have a meeting or important social event the next day this is the diet I follow. I ignore the sugar cravings during the week by telling myself I can break free on Saturdays. I'll probably keep doing this as long as I can.

The ratio of animal protein to fibre is up to you. If you're really worried about the fibre, just fill up on more animal protein and gradually increase the level of fibre.

Dr Pimentel also showed that hydrogen producers tend towards diarrhea. I'd be interesting in knowing how this diet affects IBS-D but I'd like to hear from anyone who tries this diet and the results.

Trying to analyse the diet

On Saturdays when I break loose and eat pizza, ice-cream etc I don't get a lot of gas that night. So maybe I don't have SIBO as I could expect a fair bit of gas within hours if I did. The problem starts the next day and often the day after, when I can't fully evacuate. This is what causes Leaky Gas for me. Not everyone is sensitive to antinutrients. I believe we are, and our sensitivity is that antinutrients inhibit our digestive process. This causes a lot of maldigested carbohydrate to travel fairly intact through the colon, not only feeding bacteria but causing gas that can be constipating for IBS. IBS people might just produce a lot more gas than the normal population, who often complain of bloating from wheat for e.g. They just don't get gas in the quantities we do.

Is sugar an antinutrient?

Dark chocolate was the last thing I gave up, and the hardest. After eating a near perfect diet the other day I had a few squares of dark chocolate and could feel a sensation as though it, or gas, was rushing through my colon. This would probably cause diarrhea for IBS-D. On a diet like this you notice it more when you have a bad food, as you're not having any other bad foods causing symptoms.

I'm not sure whether sugar actually inhibits digestion the way other antinutrients do, but it seems to.

The complexity of IBS

Sweet potato isn't an antinutrient though, and neither is pumpkin. But both of these feed bacteria, being either high in starch of a soluble vegetable. So there could be a bacterial overgrowth in my case as well. These 2 foods aren't toxic in any way - they should just be eliminated on an introductory diet until the bacterial imbalance is under control.

What exactly is IBS?

If IBS is just over-sensitivity to all foods, and a problem within our gut and brain, then why does this diet work so well?
 

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hi tummyrumbles

so glad you're having success with your diet. thanks for sharing.

just to clarify and not trying to argue here----as my gastroenterologists, colorectal surgeon and pelvic floor physical therapist explained to me and as i've read, pelvic floor dysfunction and ibs are two separate conditions entirely. pelvic floor dysfunction does not cause ibs per se. pelvic floor dysfunction is a separate condition. pelvic floor dysfunction is a muscle problem, where the pelvic floor muscles do not relax or coordinate properly to allow easy passage of stool. it is a condition that sometimes people with ibs-c can develop but it is not a cause of ibs. it can be a cause of chronic constipation, though, although certainly not the only one. as you pointed out, diet can be very helpful in managing ibs and ibs-c..

http://www.badgut.org/information-centre/a-z-digestive-topics/pelvic-floor-dysfunction/

http://www.uchospitals.edu/specialties/pelvic/faq/pelvic-floor-disorders.html

https://www.fascrs.org/patients/disease-condition/pelvic-floor-dysfunction-expanded-version
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Annie for replying and I would never argue with you!

The way I try to explain it is like this:

If I eat the wrong foods that I can't digest properly like wheat my evacuation is really slow the next day, meaning it takes hours. I usually get an initial urge which produces stool, but then I have to wait a long time for the second, third or fourth lots. After the first lot of stool I don't actually feel any remaining stool anywhere. I feel fairly clear. It's just experience that tells me there's more there. After about half an hour I get a slowly increasing urge again, and then there's more. My worst time was 4 hours after eating macaroni cheese and I still wasn't clear. So what it feels like to me is that the stool is up further in the colon. About half the time I expel gas before each motion, which makes me suspect that the the gas itself might be helping to cause the constipation.

When I ate the diet as above (which has a lot of animal protein!), the whole process took 15 minutes. I stayed there for ages, just to make sure - but that was the total time it took. There were only 2 lots in all, not several. I think we feel the urge to go when the stool is in the sigmoid or rectum, or at least further down in the colon. With me on a bad diet, the stool is low enough that if I don't evacuate it will cause leaky gas during the day, because there is a lot of gas associated with the stool. But the stool is high enough that it doesn't evacuate quickly, with the first stool.

So I don't get the feeling that the stool is there and that my muscles aren't relaxing enough. My incomplete evacuation seems to be related to the colon not moving stool effectively through to the lower part of the colon.

Gas can act like a neurotransmitter in the colon. Dr Pimentel did studies on this. Methane in the colon is constipating.

So I guess if you sense that the stool is there, but that your muscles aren't coordinating properly and moving it out, then you would suspect PFD, especially if you don't have gas problems.

On the other hand, if you find that certain diets affect evacuation time, as I do, and that the more gas you have the longer the evacuation, then it would seem more likely the IE and IBS is due to other factors.

So to sum up, if you try this tough diet and it works for you, you've solved your IBS. If the diet doesn't work for you and you never really had gas issues anyway, then your problem could be PFD.
 

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oh i totally agree---it does not sound like you have pfd at all. that's wonderful that you fixed your problem with diet! thank you for sharing your research and your diet with us.

wishing you all the best. take care.
 
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