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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been here a while and I notice a lot that peoples IBS, especially those with d and alternators show activation of the fight or flight. It is a common theme in a lot of threads.I believe it would help some people to talk about it and understand it better. I have posted through the years a lot about it all here.What is the "fight or flight response?"http://www.thebodysoulconnection.com/Educa...nter/fight.html
 

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FYI"The Neurobiology of Stress and EmotionsBy: Emeran A. Mayer, M.D., UCLA Mind Body Collaborative Research Center, UCLA School of Medicine, California We often hear the term "stress" associated with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients experience a worsening of symptoms during times of severely stressful life events. But what is stress? How often does it occur? How does our body respond to stress? This article explores the mechanisms that link stress and emotions to responses that have evolved to ensure survival and that, in the modern world, affect healthâ€"including gastrointestinal function. "http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/stress.htmlThis is important"In these different situations, the body consistently responds in an automatic, stressor-specific way, at times without our being aware of the response. "also"FYI"You have two brains: one in your head and another in your gut. Dr. Jackie D. Wood is a renowned physiologist at The Ohio State University. He calls the second brain, "the-little-brain-in-the-gut." This enteric nervous system is part of the autonomic nervous system and contains over one hundred million neurons, which is as many as are in the spinal cord. This complex network of nerves lines the walls of the digestive tract form the esophagus all the way down to the colon. This little brain in the gut is connected to the big brain by the vagus nerves, bundles of nerve fibers running from the GI tract to the head. All neurotransmitters, such as serotonin that are found in the brain are also present in the gut.Dr Wood has discovered that this little-brain-in-the-gut has programs that are designed for our protection and which are very much like computer programs. They respond to perceived threats in the same way that the limbic system or the emotional brain does. So the threat of a gastrointestinal infection can activate the program that increases gut contractions in order to get rid of the infection. The symptoms are abdominal cramping and diarrhea. Dr. Wood has determined that a type of cell found in the body and the gut, called the mast cell, is a key to understanding the connection of the big brain in the head with the little-brain-in-the-gut. Mast cells are involved in defense of the body. In response to certain threats or triggers, such as pollen or infection, mast cells release chemicals, such as histamine, that help to fight off the invader. Histamine is one of the chemicals that causes the symptoms of an allergy or a cold. When an infection of the gut occurs, such as food poisoning or gastroenteritis, the mast cells of the gut release histamine. The little-brain-in-the-gut interprets the mast cell signal of histamine release as a threat and calls up a protective program designed to remove the threat â€" at the expense of symptoms: abdominal pain and diarrhea. The brain to mast cell connection has a direct clinical relevance for irritable bowel syndrome and other functional gastrointestinal syndromes. It implies a mechanism for linking allostasis and the good stress response to irritable states (e.g., abdominal pain and diarrhea) of the gut. Mast cells can be activated to release histamine in response to perceived psychological stress, whether the stressor or trigger is consciously perceived or not. So the end result is the same as if an infection activated the program in the-little-brain-in-the-gut: abdominal pain and diarrhea."http://www.parkviewpub.com/nuggets/n5.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What triggers the fight or flight. Not a complete list or in any order and some of these are much more involved.A upcoming attackknowing where the restrooms arenot feeling safeworry you are going to be in severe painpanickany threat or worryto name a fewall these things effect the bodies stress responce the autonomic nervous sysytem, the enteric nervous system, gut flora, the immune system and brain gut axis connections, chemicals and neurotransmitters regulation.still underlying physical problems that are not totally understood yet and still triggers such as food, hormones and even the weather, which also effect all the systems.IBS is like in the core of a person I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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Dieselengine These are brand new if you have not seen them FYI"MedGenMed GastroenterologyIBS -- Review and What's NewPosted 07/26/2006Amy Foxx-Orenstein, DO, FACG, FACP Abstract"Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal motility disorder broadly characterized by abdominal pain/discomfort associated with altered bowel habits. The chronic and bothersome nature of IBS symptoms often negatively affects patient quality of life and activity level and places a substantial economic burden on patients and the healthcare system. Advances in research have led to a greater understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of IBS, particularly regarding the role serotonin plays in the gastrointestinal tract; the development of stepwise, symptom-based diagnostic strategies that allow for a diagnosis of IBS to be made without the need for extensive laboratory testing; and the development of treatment options targeting underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms that provide relief of the multiple symptoms associated with IBS. This review highlights recent advances in research and discusses how these findings can be applied to daily clinical practice.""Serotonin SignalingOf the putative mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of IBS, the strongest evidence points to the role of serotonin in the GI tract. The effect of serotonergic mechanisms in the manifestation of IBS symptoms has led to development of a new drug class for the treatment of IBS patients: the GI serotonergic agents.Normal GI function relies on a properly functioning brain-gut axis, which involves the coordinated interplay of the GI musculature, the CNS, the autonomic nervous system, and the enteric nervous system (ENS). The ENS contains millions of neurons embedded in the wall of the digestive tract and functions, at least in part, independently of the CNS. The size, complexity, and independent function of the ENS has resulted in application of the terms "the second brain" and "the mini-brain."[81] Impaired function or coordination of any of these systems, or the communication between these systems and the GI musculature, can lead to symptoms of dysmotility and altered sensory perception, which are characteristic of IBS and select other GI motility disorders.[82]The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is a predominant signaling molecule in the ENS. Most (90% to 95%) of the body's serotonin is found in the gut, and smaller amounts are found in the brain (about 3%) and in platelets (about 2%).[83] In the GI tract, serotonin facilitates communication between the ENS and its effector systems (muscles, secretory endothelium, endocrine cells, and vasculature of the GI tract), thus playing a key role in normal GI tract functioning.[84] In addition, serotonin plays a role in the communication between the ENS and the CNS.In the gut, serotonin is synthesized by and stored in the enterochromaffin cells, which are located within the mucosa of the intestinal wall. When material passes through the lumen and the mucosa is stimulated, enterochromaffin cells release serotonin, which then binds to its receptors (primarily 5-HT1P receptors) on intrinsic primary afferent neurons, initiating peristalsis and secretion. Serotonin also binds to 5-HT4 receptors on interneurons, which augments the transmission of signals to motor neurons, resulting in enhanced peristaltic activity. In transgenic mice lacking 5-HT4 receptors, colonic motility is abnormally slow, confirming the role of these receptors in facilitating normal colonic motility.[85] By binding to 5-HT3 receptors on efferent sensory innervations coming from the vagus and the spinal nerves, serotonin mediates signaling between the ENS and the CNS and, thus, modulates pain perception.To regulate the signaling process, excess serotonin must be removed; this is accomplished by the SERT molecule expressed by intestinal epithelial cells.[86] Human studies have shown that defects in serotonin signaling contribute to the pathophysiology of IBS and, potentially, other GI motility disorders. In a recent study by Coates and colleagues,[87] biopsy specimens from patients with IBS showed significantly lower mucosal serotonin concentrations than those from healthy controls, potentially the result of lower mRNA levels for tryptophan hydroxylase (the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin synthesis), which were also significantly lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.[87] There was no significant difference in the number of enterochromaffin cells or in the capacity of these cells to release serotonin under stimulated conditions. In another study, higher serotonin levels were observed in mucosal biopsy samples from patients with IBS with constipation (IBS-C) than in patients with IBS-D or in healthy volunteers.[88]Serotonin levels may also be affected by altering the amount or function of SERT. The study by Coates and colleagues[87] showed a significant decrease in the level of SERT mRNA and SERT protein expressed in the intestinal epithelial cells of IBS patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. In another study,[89] SERT expression and binding capacity in platelets were decreased in women with IBS-D compared with expression and binding capacity in healthy controls. Furthermore, Chen and colleagues[90] showed that mice with a SERT gene deletion had altered colonic motility. It is interesting to note that the mice thrived in laboratory housing conditions, indicating that other transporters could compensate for the lack of SERT. Additional studies have focused on SERT polymorphisms. Yeo and colleagues[91] showed an association between patients with IBS-D and the homozygous short polymorphism of the SERT gene promoter. This mutation results in lower levels of SERT gene transcription and reduced amounts of SERT protein available for reuptake of serotonin. In addition, Camilleri and colleagues[92] showed a possible link between the long promoter polymorphism and patient response to therapy.Thus, a substantially large body of work shows that normal gut physiology is predicated on the interplay between the GI musculature and the ENS, autonomic nervous system, and CNS. One of the central mediators of this complex interplay is the neurotransmitter serotonin. Impairment or imbalance in serotonergic signaling, which can affect GI motility, secretion, and visceral sensitivity, may be affected by defects or deficiencies in serotonin production, specific serotonin receptors, or proteins such as SERT. These changes can manifest in symptoms associated with IBS, including abdominal pain, altered bowel habits (constipation, diarrhea, or alternation between these 2 states), and bloating."http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/532089_printThis is very important new info as well.""From Medscape GastroenterologyLiterature Review -- Select Topics in IBS and Chronic ConstipationLatest From the Literature in IBS and Chronic Constipation: September 2006Posted 09/07/2006Brian E. Lacy, MD, PhD "One, it confirms the now widely accepted view that the brain-gut axis is a critical component in IBS. Two, it emphasizes that hypersensitivity is a key underlying pathophysiologic mechanism in the generation of symptoms in IBS patients. And finally, although not evaluated in this study, these findings point out that therapeutic options for patients with IBS should focus on treating both the hypersensitive gut and the hypersensitive CNS."http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/544018_2
 

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Thanks John, for the good words.Hopefully the information helps people to treat there IBS, as it has my own.While stress doesn't cause IBS itself, the underlying disorder is greatly influenced by stress and anxiety and even emotions, that cause chemical changes to the system.Before I started to study these reactions in depth, I actually didn't know anything about real stress mechanisms or even that there was a "brain in the gut." It makes much more sense to me know and how it actually does effect IBS and chemistry and bodily functions.this is another important aspect of all thisVisceral Sensations and Brain-Gut Mechanismshttp://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/VisceralSensations.htmlReport from the 6th International Symposium on Functional Gastrointestinal DisordersBy: Douglas A. Drossman, MD and William F. Norton, IFFGD"Demonstration of post-infectious IBS as a brain-gut disorder"http://www.iffgd.org/symposium2005report.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
FYI"Although there is much we do not know about the physiological causes of IBS symptoms, the Neuroenteric Disease Program, and other research groups, have identified an over-sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract as one contributing factor. The colon and rectum of patients with IBS seem to respond differently to natural processes such as pressure and stretch which follow meals or normal contractions. This increased sensitivity begins in the nerves which sense what is taking place in the colon and rectum, and may result in an over-reaction in the brain and in turn the nerves which send messages back to the GI tract. This can set up a vicious cycle of symptoms (including pain) and the feeling “something is wrong” even though only normal digestion is taking place. Understanding IBS hypersensitivity can lead directly to new medications which may control this process, and get at the root cause of IBS symptoms."http://ibs.med.ucla.edu/Articles/PatientArticleSp98Long.htm
 

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quote:Originally posted by eric: This can set up a vicious cycle of symptoms (including pain) and the feeling “something is wrong” even though only normal digestion is taking place.
I had a minor Ephinany when reading these lines Eric. The focus of my thoughts will concentrate SO much on my bowel(especially when I can't sleep.) That the slightest change or flutter is picked up immediatley and magnified. These new articles are very encouraging. I will be asking my Doctor about the GI Seratonin medicine for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Both the new serotonin drugs are very new and may or may not help really, although worth asking about perhaps. However there are ways to modify serotonin in the body. There are ways to treat IBS first before you try medications.Dieselengine, what are your symptoms?
 

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quote:Dieselengine, what are your symptoms?
Well Eric I am neither C O D dominate I have a little of both but not to the extend that many on these boards have. My main problem is Gas. Its build up particulary. The noises the uncomfortable sensations that seem to come from all over my upper body. I do get the classic IBS pain on the left hand side just under the last rib, a dull ache that is cleared after a bathroom visit, no other real pain as such, a few twinges now and again but nothing severe.I also get waves of, not quite nausea, but just an unplesant sensation that echos through my body. My sleep pattern is also a problem very poor quality sleep staying up most nights into the early am. I know this is doing me No good but it is a hard cycle to break, I am currently on Sickness pay so I don't have to get up for work. And when I feel rotten, which is mostly in the early mornings, I just stay in bed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Dieselengine, Its sounds like you are an alternator really.Sleep is crucial for IBS.Read this thread on HT and IBS. It can help your sleep patterns and sleep in general, boost the immune system, alleviate pain and symptoms and basically break the cycle. It can be very effective for most people and side effect free.It can also be effective on the gas and bloating, but realxing the gut so the gas can pass and not get trapped. It is also a recommended treatment by the Rome Experts. There is a lot of info on it all and has been research for twenty some years now.http://ibsgroup.org/groupee/forums/a/tpc/f...0261/m/10210344
 
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