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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, after 4 years of this you think I should know now but my GI doctor keeps just dismissing me. I wondered if someone could clarify something for me. I am diagnosed with IBS but have been in constant and I mean constant pain or discomfort since the onset, I was just wondering if there is a test for Crohn's disease or in other words how you get to become diagnosed with Crohn's disease. Again apologies for the ignorance. The only abnormality they have found with me was when I had my endoscopy about 3 years agao they found my stomach mildly inflamed.Thanks ever so muchJamie
 

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I think they can tell if you have any inflammation or other abnormalties by having an abdominal CAT scan. I think a colonoscopy would also show if you had inflammation in the lower part of your abdomen. Hope this helps
 

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I think they can tell if you have any inflammation or other abnormalties by having an abdominal CAT scan. I think a colonoscopy would also show if you had inflammation in the lower part of your abdomen. Hope this helps
 

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Current Approach to the Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/diagnosis.html Blood tests and stool tests should be done.Inflammatory bowel diseases usally cause alarm symptoms, that may require further work up. Characteristicsof IBS http://www.aboutibs.org/characteristics.html and alarm symptoms"Anemia, bleeding, unexplained weight loss, or fever are not characteristic of IBS. You should alert your physician immediately if you are experiencing these symptoms. Other factors that may suggest the presence of an organic disease include awakening from sleep at night, family history of colon cancer or inflammatory bowel disease, and onset of symptoms (or change in symptoms) over the age of 50. "It also sounds like you don't have a very good doctor, it is worth finding a new one who does not dismiss you.Also, how close is "University Hospital of South Manchester, England " from where your at? There are major specialists there.BBC News World Edition Outlook affects bowel disorder patients People's perception of their bowel disorder affects how they cope with the condition, researchers have found. If they believe their Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is due to an external factor, such as a virus and that it can be controlled, they cope well. But if they believe it is caused by psychological factors, they are less likely to cope with IBS. Researchers from the University of Kent interviewed over 200 patients with IBS. They were asked about their symptoms and what they believed about the causes and the severity of the disorder. Patients were also asked to what extent people believed their IBS can be controlled or cured, how they coped with it and how anxious or depressed they were. It was found that those who believed it could be controlled or cured were likely to accept their IBS and have a better quality of life. But those who thought IBS was a very serious illness with potentially serious consequences suffered more anxiety and depression. They also had a lower quality of life. But Drs Claire and Derek Rutter, who carried out the research, said these people were more likely to try to avoid thinking or dealing with their IBS, which meant they were likely to fare less well. They said therapy may help IBS patients to feel better. Writing in the British Journal of Health Psychology, they said: "The effectiveness of psychological therapy for IBS patients may improve if therapists challenge patients' perceptions of serious consequences and may offer alternatives to behavioural disengagement and venting emotions. "Therapists might also try to increase control beliefs and acceptance of the illness." IBS varies between patients, but it usually includes cramping discomfort, a feeling of fullness or bloating, constipation and diarrhoea. Women are affected more than men. Sufferers often desperately need to go to the toilet with little warning, which severely limits their lifestyle. No-one knows what causes the condition, although it is suggested that stress can make it worse. Most people are advised to try to manage the condition by changing their diet and trying to reduce stress levels, as well as taking other medication. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2385631.stm You can also contact"The IBS NetworkNorthern General Hospital, Sheffield, S5 7AU Web: www.ibsnetwork.org.ukThe IBS Network offers advice, information and support and can help you to help yourself.For general information about IBS and the services the IBS Network offers write enclosing a large SAE and a one pound coin (or see their website)For specific queries about your IBS, call the IBS Network Helpline 01543 492 192 Mon-Fri 6pm to 8pm. Calls to the Helpline are answered by a specialist IBS nurse. "
 

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Current Approach to the Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/diagnosis.html Blood tests and stool tests should be done.Inflammatory bowel diseases usally cause alarm symptoms, that may require further work up. Characteristicsof IBS http://www.aboutibs.org/characteristics.html and alarm symptoms"Anemia, bleeding, unexplained weight loss, or fever are not characteristic of IBS. You should alert your physician immediately if you are experiencing these symptoms. Other factors that may suggest the presence of an organic disease include awakening from sleep at night, family history of colon cancer or inflammatory bowel disease, and onset of symptoms (or change in symptoms) over the age of 50. "It also sounds like you don't have a very good doctor, it is worth finding a new one who does not dismiss you.Also, how close is "University Hospital of South Manchester, England " from where your at? There are major specialists there.BBC News World Edition Outlook affects bowel disorder patients People's perception of their bowel disorder affects how they cope with the condition, researchers have found. If they believe their Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is due to an external factor, such as a virus and that it can be controlled, they cope well. But if they believe it is caused by psychological factors, they are less likely to cope with IBS. Researchers from the University of Kent interviewed over 200 patients with IBS. They were asked about their symptoms and what they believed about the causes and the severity of the disorder. Patients were also asked to what extent people believed their IBS can be controlled or cured, how they coped with it and how anxious or depressed they were. It was found that those who believed it could be controlled or cured were likely to accept their IBS and have a better quality of life. But those who thought IBS was a very serious illness with potentially serious consequences suffered more anxiety and depression. They also had a lower quality of life. But Drs Claire and Derek Rutter, who carried out the research, said these people were more likely to try to avoid thinking or dealing with their IBS, which meant they were likely to fare less well. They said therapy may help IBS patients to feel better. Writing in the British Journal of Health Psychology, they said: "The effectiveness of psychological therapy for IBS patients may improve if therapists challenge patients' perceptions of serious consequences and may offer alternatives to behavioural disengagement and venting emotions. "Therapists might also try to increase control beliefs and acceptance of the illness." IBS varies between patients, but it usually includes cramping discomfort, a feeling of fullness or bloating, constipation and diarrhoea. Women are affected more than men. Sufferers often desperately need to go to the toilet with little warning, which severely limits their lifestyle. No-one knows what causes the condition, although it is suggested that stress can make it worse. Most people are advised to try to manage the condition by changing their diet and trying to reduce stress levels, as well as taking other medication. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2385631.stm You can also contact"The IBS NetworkNorthern General Hospital, Sheffield, S5 7AU Web: www.ibsnetwork.org.ukThe IBS Network offers advice, information and support and can help you to help yourself.For general information about IBS and the services the IBS Network offers write enclosing a large SAE and a one pound coin (or see their website)For specific queries about your IBS, call the IBS Network Helpline 01543 492 192 Mon-Fri 6pm to 8pm. Calls to the Helpline are answered by a specialist IBS nurse. "
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi there Eric. I actually wrote my Masters (social not medical) dissertation on IBS from interviewing people with IBS on this board, partly as a way for understanding it myself and partly to disseminate information about it. I am hopefully going to write a paper about my findings but have been ill with my symptoms and struggle to function let alone think
I live about 300 mile away form Manchester in Swansea (Wales. I think the term out of sight out of mind is the way to describe how themedical profession treat me.Thanks very much for that information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi there Eric. I actually wrote my Masters (social not medical) dissertation on IBS from interviewing people with IBS on this board, partly as a way for understanding it myself and partly to disseminate information about it. I am hopefully going to write a paper about my findings but have been ill with my symptoms and struggle to function let alone think
I live about 300 mile away form Manchester in Swansea (Wales. I think the term out of sight out of mind is the way to describe how themedical profession treat me.Thanks very much for that information.
 
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