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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading some posts yesterday and by accident found the term "Narcotic Bowel Syndrome". It was the first time I ever heard of that (2 years with IBS, I can't figure out why
)I'm intereset in your opinions about this. So far I read very sparse information. I don't know how is anyone diagnosed having it, although I found that treatment usually focus in the mind-gut connection, even using Tricyclic antidepressants.The reason I'm asking is that I developed IBS after an antibiotic course because of pneumonia. But I didn't remember until now that while doing the antibiotics I also took benzodiazepines (Rivotril, small dosage) for about 4 months, mainly because I was too stressed out. It was my doctor's idea.Can Rivotril be considered a Narcotic?And even further, I remember a little more than a year ago being prescribed with Lexapro (for 3 months), an antidepresant, which in the end messed up with my sex drive and didn't help my IBS.Perhaps I'm just worring too much, but I want to learn more about this Narcotic Bowel thing just in case. And of course, incidentally, my main symptom has always been abdominal pain.
Thanks.
 

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No, benzos are not narcotic. They are actually used to treat IBS.NBS is supposed to happen in some who are addicted /dependant on narcotics. It makes you experience pain more acutely than normal.I don't know that I figure it would be much more than your withdrawal from, or bodies desire for more of, the drug as narcotic pain killers are chemically addictive. Another poster on the board is quite knowledgable on it, just use the find feature on the forum for narcotic bowel syndrome and you'll find plenty of stuff Eric has posted.
 

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quote:benzos are not narcotic. They are actually used to treat IBS
Not for IBS per se, but only as adjunct. There is a benzo called Dextofisopam, which is intended specifically for IBS because it works differently than other benzos and just happens to beneficial for IBS, but it's only in testing at this point.
 

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Narcotic bowel syndrome arises in certain persons who have been taking opioids for extended periods of time -- i.e., chronic opioid use; symptoms include ileus, vomiting, and abdominal pain and cramping.Benzodiazepines are not narcotics or opiates; they are minor tranquilizers. They would have no role in NBS.In any event, NBS may be resolved by having the patient discontinue taking opioids. Of course, this may lead to withdrawal symptoms, etc., so if NBS presents a major problem and rapid withdrawal is required, clonidine is usually recommended to attenuate the withdrawal symptoms.NBS can be a major problem with patients with chronic pain (e.g., from cancer) who require round-the-clock opioids. As flux mentioned, benzodiazepines are generally not indicated as a treatment for IBS, except perhaps as adjunctive therapy, such as Librax, which used to contain chlordiazepoxide (Librium) and clidinium.
 

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For people who have anxiety driven IBS symptoms (that vicious cycle where the IBS symptoms make you anxious which makes the IBS act up more which makes you more anxious which makes the IBS act up even more...) benzos can be part of the treatment that breaks that cycle.So it isn't treating the IBS directly, but the anxiety cycle that makes the IBS much worse than it would otherwise be.K.
 

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In one of the UNC chat with the experts they discussed narcotic bowel syndrome. They said it was pretty common.There is really not a lot of info on it, but seems to be recognized by the majority of doctors as a problem with narcotics and IBS."Narcotic. Narcotic analgesic drugs are usually not prescribed for continuous treatment because of possible development of physical dependency or addiction and unwanted side effects, such as drowsiness and interference with clear thinking. Furthermore, continuous narcotic use can actually increase pain sensitivity and also alter gut motility, leading to severe constipation. This is called the “narcotic bowel syndrome” (Annals of Internal Medicine, 1984;101:331â€"334). Keeping these cautions in mind, narcotic analgesic drugs are occasionally used to relieve intermittent attacks of more severe pain."http://www.grandtimes.com/Treatment_of_Irritable.html Ann Intern Med. 1984 Sep;101(3):331-4. Links Narcotic bowel syndrome treated with clonidine. Resolution of abdominal pain and intestinal pseudo-obstruction.Sandgren JE, McPhee MS, Greenberger NJ. We describe the cases of five patients having a syndrome of chronic abdominal pain, vomiting, weight loss, and features of intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with prolonged use or abuse of narcotic analgesics. In each patient, abdominal complaints were originally attributed to either mechanical bowel obstruction or an underlying gastrointestinal disorder often involving prior abdominal surgery. Symptoms resolved rapidly in all patients when narcotic administration was stopped. Clonidine therapy was used to alleviate symptoms of narcotic analgesic withdrawal. The narcotic bowel syndrome is a clinically important and frequently unrecognized cause of chronic abdominal pain.PMID: 6147108 An important part of the diagnoses in IBS is pain or discomfort. On the right side of this page shows the sensory pathways for pain in IBS. Serotonin is involved in sending that signal from the gut to the brain.http://hopkins-gi.nts.jhu.edu/pages/latin/...se=43&lang_id=1
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks eric,As usual the info is good, now that this time I even found animations!!!This link is a very good starter for new IBSers.Finally, I guess I don't have to worry that much about Narcotic Bowel Syndrome then. The most drugs I've ever had were while on pneumonia, but no narcotics.Good to know
 

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Flux, have you read up on Dextofisopam at all? I take Xanax which seems to calm down general excitement/anxiety, which I believe helps my IBS indirectly...I questioned this when my dose was inadequate, but now that I feel I'm on a much more therapeutic dose I tend to think otherwise.I've tried researching Dextofisopam myself but all the medical jargon is way beyond me.Does it look promising at all?
 

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quote:have you read up on Dextofisopam at all? I take Xanax which seems to calm down general excitement/anxiety, which I believe helps my IBS indirectly.
This drug seems to be specific for IBS-D itself and doesn't do the things that a drug like Xanax does.
 

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I've tried to make sense of the medical jargon, but like I mentioned above, it's beyond me!How is it different from the benzos like Xanax? Xanax affects GABA in the brain, correct? How are the mechanisms of dextofisopam different from Xanax? Sorry if you haven't really researched it...just thought you might be able to dissect the literature better than me.
 
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