Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just curious if any of you have asked your doctors about trying meds for those diseases when you have tested negative for them. I was thinking particularly about antiinflamatories. I have an appointment next month where I think I'll be getting a Lotronex prescription, but I was wondering about antiinflamatories as they sound like they have less risks. Do you think it's worth trying?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Most doctors will not try Crohn's/Colitis medications unless there is direct evidence for the disease or if there is an extremely strong suspicion. It depends somewhat on what testing you have had done. Prednisone is the medication that is usually used to control flares of inflammatory bowel disease, but it has risks associated with it and doctors do not like to have patients on it long term. Typically they maintain remission with formulations of 5-ASA, which are also anti-inflammatories. Depending on the type, the medications can target different areas of the intestines.If anything, I would ask your doctor for additional testing if you really think you have IBD and not IBS because if you take IBD medications they will eliminate the signs of the disease. Then you're really caught in a pattern of IBD vs. IBS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,955 Posts
Most of the anti-inflammatories tend to have long term complications so they usually won't prescribe them if you are negative for all tests for inflammation.Suppressing the immune system almost always increases the risk for infections so they often don't want to do that unless there is a good reason to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,330 Posts
I took sulphursalazine for 12 years with no apparent side effects but they aren't given out willy nilly as they can react badly with some people.I was told that they were just like aspirin so not that strong in normal terms.I was only diagnosed with Colitis but I believe Crohns medications can be much stronger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,019 Posts
I have been using a flavonoid supplement since 1998, with anti-inflammatory properties, that has kept my D to a minimum since the end of 1999. It has also helped numbers of people with IBD. The only negative side effects are a slight blood thinning from the gingko and the grape seed. The positive side effect--what it was actually developed for--is to lower the oxidation of cholesterol. "All natural." (Sorry, I just couldn't help myself.)Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
My GI had me try Pantessa which I think is a generic version of Asecol just for the hell of it to see if it had any effects but it didn't. This was before doing a colonoscopy and rulling out Crohns.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top