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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Celiac test came back negative so now my doc wants me to try to avoid msg. I figured the only full way to do this is to eat Organic food only. I have ibs-d and am wondering if anyone has started eating this way to avoid all the stuff they put in foods these days. If so have you seen an improvement and how long did it take to see one. I take lomotil which works awesome for me but i would really like not having to rely on pills every single day of my life. I have been taken them daily for about 6 months now. So Organic worth a try? I've alot of other things and am wondering should I?
 

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It doesn't have to be fully organic. As long as you stick to whole foods you should be OK (and check labels for anything that is made of several things together).Some natural things have MSG in them and if they are organic they still have MSG in them.http://www.naturodoc.com/library/nutrition/MSG.htm has a list of the additives to avoid. I wouldn't trust an organic label for things like soups as certain seaweeds and other natural things have MSG in them. I think the whole food vs processed is probably more important than organic vs non-organic. Somethings are just as processed and have a lot of additives (just different ones) and can still call themselves organic.Natural also isn't necessarily a safe word. A lot of people do just as badly from things like apple or pear concentrate with a ton of naturally occurring sorbitol in them as they would from high fructose corn syrup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will check into that. I just assumed that organic meant healthy but your right about whole foods vs processed foods which I guess is really what i am needing to look into.
 

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Some of the time "organic" and "natural" are more about marketing then health. A cookie or a fruit roll up is still really processed even if it is made with organic wheat or organic strawberries.Now I do think more of the natural and organic foods are a bit more likely to be healthy, but it isn't a sure bet. That is why if it has to have a label on it to be sold you need to check for the additives to see if any are ones you can't have.
 

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You may want to consider trying a gluten-free diet for a bit even though your celiac test was negative. I'm going to do this sometime in the near future to see if it makes any difference in terms of my GI symptoms (and some other, non-GI stuff I've been experiencing). From what I've read you can test negative for celiac and still be sensitive to gluten (not that uncommon).As for avoiding MSG: like Kathleen said, just read the ingredients on everything you eat, and try to eat whole foods only (no processed). Doesn't necessarily have to be organic I don't think...
 

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Some people prefer an all organic, but to avoid MSG I think a less processed diet is more important. A conventionally grown fruit or veggie isn't going to have MSG added to it (it isn't anything to keep bugs off, etc.)But if a meat has broth injected into it you need to make sure that broth is free of MSG. Even a lot of "natural flavorings" or yeast extract is mostly because those things are high in MSG and sound better than just saying MSG on the label.
 

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I have a totally organic diet - no chemicals - except for the unavoidable. My water is RO. There are still problems with D but my overall health is 100% better than a couple of years ago. With this problem we have we have to worry about nutrients. I take a load of supplements as well and they're also organic. Even my probiotics are as pure as I can find. I have no dairy, no grains, no sugar. My energy level is at least where I can manage now and my immunity is great. Organic is the way to go.
 

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You do still have to read the labels if you are using prepared ingredients; but by combining that with using organic where possible, you will remove the problem of some layer of chemical residues you might otherwise absorb. It will be more expensive; but if that isn't a problem, then it is something you can try.Mark
 

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There are some fruits and veggies where it makes more of a difference than others (some conventionally grown things don't have any measurable residues depending on what is used)http://www.organic.org/articles/showarticle/article-214 has a list of the fruits and veggies most likely and least likely to have pesticide residues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Faze Action... I have thought about trying to eat gluten free anyways because my first blood work came back that I have a slight allergy to wheat but when done a second time along with a biopsy it shows i don't. So I was wondering if I should give it a shot or not. I'm not really sure where to start. Thanks for everyones comments and advice on this subject I really apreciate it all.
 

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Faze Action... I have thought about trying to eat gluten free anyways because my first blood work came back that I have a slight allergy to wheat but when done a second time along with a biopsy it shows i don't. So I was wondering if I should give it a shot or not. I'm not really sure where to start. Thanks for everyones comments and advice on this subject I really apreciate it all.
Personally, I'd give it a shot anyway... my blood test for celiac was also negative, but I've heard so many stories about people going GF and having it improve their symptoms that I figured I'd give it a try. I notice that I tend to feel generally better when I avoid carbs overall, so not sure the gluten will turn out to be an issue for me though (maybe as Kathleen said in the other thread it's starches or something more general).As for starting I'd just start reading labels on the foods you eat. I'm in the habit of reading ingredients on labels anyway (and it amazes me how many people do not do this- I want to know what's going into my body!). Look for stuff that is specifically labeled as "gluten-free", especially if it's a pre-packaged food. Other than that stick to whole foods that you know don't have gluten (meats, fish, vegetables, etc). I think that rice, corn, and potatoes should be okay for starches/carbs, and I believe breads made with amaranth flour are okay too.Not sure about alcoholic beverages (if you drink), but I think beer should be avoided.
 
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