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I am just curious if anyone experiences extreme back pain like I do associated with IBS? When I'm bloated, yes i feel abdominal discomfort, but no real pain. The pain I get is up my backbone and shoots left and right in the mid back section. Xrays have confirmed there is no degeneration in my spine and when I relieve myself the pain subsides. Can anyone relate? Thank you and Happy Holidays to All
 

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This is pretty commonIBS � Beyond the Bowel:The Meaning of Co-existing Medical ProblemsOlafur S. Palsson, Psy.D. and William E. Whitehead, Ph.D.UNC Center for Functional GI & Motility DisordersIrritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder that is defined by a specific pattern ofgastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in the absence of abnormal physical findings. The latestdiagnostic criteria for IBS -- the Rome II criteria created by an international team ofexperts -- require that the patient have abdominal pain for at least 12 weeks within thepast 12 months and that the pain meets two of the following three criteria: it is relievedafter bowel movement, associated with change in stool frequency, or associated withstool form. It is becoming clear, however, that these bowel symptoms do not tell thewhole story of symptoms experienced by IBS patients. People with this disorder oftenhave many uncomfortable non-gastrointestinal (non-GI) symptoms and other healthproblems in addition to their intestinal troubles.SYMPTOMS ALL OVER THE BODY IN IBSSeveral research reports have established that IBS patients report non-bowel symptomsmore frequently than other GI patients and general medical patients. For example, fourstudies that have asked IBS patients about a wide variety of body symptoms(1-4) all foundheadaches (reported by 23-45% of IBS patients), back pain (28-81%), and frequenturination (20-56%) to be unusually common in individuals with IBS compared to otherpeople. Fatigue (36-63%) and bad breath or unpleasant taste in the mouth (16-63%) werefound in three of these four studies to be more common among IBS patients, as well.Furthermore, a large number of other symptoms have been reported to occur withunusually high frequency in single studies. In our recent systematic review of the medicalliterature(5), we found a total 26 different symptoms, listed in Table 1, that are reported tobe more common in IBS patients than comparison groups in at least one study.Table 1. Non-gastrointestinal symptoms more common in irritable bowel syndromepatients than in comparison groups(5).1. Headache2. Dizziness3. Heart palpitations or racing heart4. Back pain5. Shortness of breath6. Muscle ache7. Frequent urinating8. Difficulty urinating9. Sensitivity to heat or cold10. Constant tiredness11. Pain during intercourse (sex)12. Trembling hands13. Sleeping difficulties14. Bad breath/unpleasant taste inmouth15. Grinding your teeth16. Jaw pain17. Flushing of your face and neck18. Dry mouth19. Weak or wobbly legs20. Scratchy throat21. Tightness or pressure in chest22. Low sex drive23. Poor appetite24. Eye pain25. Stiff muscles26. Eye twitchingOVERLAP WITH OTHER MEDICAL CONDITIONS http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php...c;f=10;t=001032 Back pain and irritable bowel syndrome � Previous article in Issue � Next article in Issue � View print version (PDF) � Drug links from Mosby's DrugConsult � Genetic information from OMIM � Citation of this Article � View on PubMed � Download in citation manager format � Download in Medlars format � Related articles in PubMed Dear Sir:In the June issue of GASTROENTEROLOGY, Longstreth and Yao1 drew attention to an excess of cholecystectomy, appendectomy, hysterectomy, and back surgery in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Various explanations were offered in both the paper and the accompanying editorial2 but relatively little attention was given to why patients should have an excess of back surgery.In 1986, we showed that patients with IBS suffer from a wide range of disparate symptoms not necessarily of a gastrointestinal nature.3 These included gynecological and urological complaints but it was also particularly noteworthy that backache was extremely common, occurring in 68% of individuals. In subsequent publications we found the figure to be even higher at 75%4 and 81%.5 Furthermore, patients reported that this symptom was especially intrusive4 and we demonstrated that it also had good discriminant value in helping to substantiate the diagnosis of IBS,5 and in differentiating it from other gastrointestinal disorders. I was therefore slightly surprised that none of these data were quoted, especially as they do suggest a possible reason why patients with IBS might be referred to an orthopedic surgeon for an opinion.We routinely enquire about low backache in our IBS clinic and a large proportion of patients will admit to having this symptom. However, they usually go on to say that they have previously consulted their doctor about this problem who has told them they have some form of degenerative disease of the spine, especially if a subsequent x-ray shows an degree of �wear and tear,� even if only mild. We have also noted an excess of back surgery in our patients, which seldom proves to be helpful, although we have not published this finding.It is my view that this backache does not originate from the spine and is possibly attributable to some form of referred pain from the gut. My reasons for coming to this conclusion are because it is not accompanied by any physical signs suggesting spinal pathology, it seldom gets worse with time, it often mirrors the course of the IBS in terms of its severity, and lastly, once this relationship has been pointed out to the patient they cease being so bothered by it and subsequently even notice for themselves, that there is a relationship to their gastrointestinal symptoms.The noncolonic symptoms of IBS are a major problem and a constant source of diagnostic confusion and inappropriate treatment6 although the gynecological consequences are now better recognized.7 Nevertheless, if they were sought after and understood earlier in a patients encounter with the medical profession, much inappropriate investigation and referral could still probably be avoided. It is my experience that patients cope surprisingly well with these troublesome symptoms once they appreciate that they are linked to their IBS and are not indicative of some underlying pathology that is being overlooked.P.J. Whorwell aaEducation and Research Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, England http://www2.us.elsevierhealth.com/scripts/...017408&nav=full
 

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This is pretty commonIBS � Beyond the Bowel:The Meaning of Co-existing Medical ProblemsOlafur S. Palsson, Psy.D. and William E. Whitehead, Ph.D.UNC Center for Functional GI & Motility DisordersIrritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder that is defined by a specific pattern ofgastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in the absence of abnormal physical findings. The latestdiagnostic criteria for IBS -- the Rome II criteria created by an international team ofexperts -- require that the patient have abdominal pain for at least 12 weeks within thepast 12 months and that the pain meets two of the following three criteria: it is relievedafter bowel movement, associated with change in stool frequency, or associated withstool form. It is becoming clear, however, that these bowel symptoms do not tell thewhole story of symptoms experienced by IBS patients. People with this disorder oftenhave many uncomfortable non-gastrointestinal (non-GI) symptoms and other healthproblems in addition to their intestinal troubles.SYMPTOMS ALL OVER THE BODY IN IBSSeveral research reports have established that IBS patients report non-bowel symptomsmore frequently than other GI patients and general medical patients. For example, fourstudies that have asked IBS patients about a wide variety of body symptoms(1-4) all foundheadaches (reported by 23-45% of IBS patients), back pain (28-81%), and frequenturination (20-56%) to be unusually common in individuals with IBS compared to otherpeople. Fatigue (36-63%) and bad breath or unpleasant taste in the mouth (16-63%) werefound in three of these four studies to be more common among IBS patients, as well.Furthermore, a large number of other symptoms have been reported to occur withunusually high frequency in single studies. In our recent systematic review of the medicalliterature(5), we found a total 26 different symptoms, listed in Table 1, that are reported tobe more common in IBS patients than comparison groups in at least one study.Table 1. Non-gastrointestinal symptoms more common in irritable bowel syndromepatients than in comparison groups(5).1. Headache2. Dizziness3. Heart palpitations or racing heart4. Back pain5. Shortness of breath6. Muscle ache7. Frequent urinating8. Difficulty urinating9. Sensitivity to heat or cold10. Constant tiredness11. Pain during intercourse (sex)12. Trembling hands13. Sleeping difficulties14. Bad breath/unpleasant taste inmouth15. Grinding your teeth16. Jaw pain17. Flushing of your face and neck18. Dry mouth19. Weak or wobbly legs20. Scratchy throat21. Tightness or pressure in chest22. Low sex drive23. Poor appetite24. Eye pain25. Stiff muscles26. Eye twitchingOVERLAP WITH OTHER MEDICAL CONDITIONS http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php...c;f=10;t=001032 Back pain and irritable bowel syndrome � Previous article in Issue � Next article in Issue � View print version (PDF) � Drug links from Mosby's DrugConsult � Genetic information from OMIM � Citation of this Article � View on PubMed � Download in citation manager format � Download in Medlars format � Related articles in PubMed Dear Sir:In the June issue of GASTROENTEROLOGY, Longstreth and Yao1 drew attention to an excess of cholecystectomy, appendectomy, hysterectomy, and back surgery in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Various explanations were offered in both the paper and the accompanying editorial2 but relatively little attention was given to why patients should have an excess of back surgery.In 1986, we showed that patients with IBS suffer from a wide range of disparate symptoms not necessarily of a gastrointestinal nature.3 These included gynecological and urological complaints but it was also particularly noteworthy that backache was extremely common, occurring in 68% of individuals. In subsequent publications we found the figure to be even higher at 75%4 and 81%.5 Furthermore, patients reported that this symptom was especially intrusive4 and we demonstrated that it also had good discriminant value in helping to substantiate the diagnosis of IBS,5 and in differentiating it from other gastrointestinal disorders. I was therefore slightly surprised that none of these data were quoted, especially as they do suggest a possible reason why patients with IBS might be referred to an orthopedic surgeon for an opinion.We routinely enquire about low backache in our IBS clinic and a large proportion of patients will admit to having this symptom. However, they usually go on to say that they have previously consulted their doctor about this problem who has told them they have some form of degenerative disease of the spine, especially if a subsequent x-ray shows an degree of �wear and tear,� even if only mild. We have also noted an excess of back surgery in our patients, which seldom proves to be helpful, although we have not published this finding.It is my view that this backache does not originate from the spine and is possibly attributable to some form of referred pain from the gut. My reasons for coming to this conclusion are because it is not accompanied by any physical signs suggesting spinal pathology, it seldom gets worse with time, it often mirrors the course of the IBS in terms of its severity, and lastly, once this relationship has been pointed out to the patient they cease being so bothered by it and subsequently even notice for themselves, that there is a relationship to their gastrointestinal symptoms.The noncolonic symptoms of IBS are a major problem and a constant source of diagnostic confusion and inappropriate treatment6 although the gynecological consequences are now better recognized.7 Nevertheless, if they were sought after and understood earlier in a patients encounter with the medical profession, much inappropriate investigation and referral could still probably be avoided. It is my experience that patients cope surprisingly well with these troublesome symptoms once they appreciate that they are linked to their IBS and are not indicative of some underlying pathology that is being overlooked.P.J. Whorwell aaEducation and Research Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, England http://www2.us.elsevierhealth.com/scripts/...017408&nav=full
 

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Fiddler, the muscles in the body can get pretty tense with IBS, and we can become less aware of it as we get use to it and time passes. You should talk to your doctor about progressive muscle relaxation.It can be very helpful for this and overall body tension and even the IBS.
 

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Fiddler, the muscles in the body can get pretty tense with IBS, and we can become less aware of it as we get use to it and time passes. You should talk to your doctor about progressive muscle relaxation.It can be very helpful for this and overall body tension and even the IBS.
 

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I have my own theory about weird IBS pain and what may cause at least some of it. I have no hard science to back this up and it may sound really lame but here it is:The vagus nerve is one of the largest nerves in our bodies. It wanders (vagus = wander) through multiple organs and organ systems including our guts. I think, at least sometimes, our bloat or some other event physically impinges on a vagus branch and is misinterpreted by our brains as pain somewhere else.There are times when I am having a bad IBS day and I have bad back pain between my shoulders. A pain that "feels" like I have pulled a muscle. Occasionally, if there is the slightest movement or spurt in my guts, the back pain will immediately go away. I wonder if the spurt relieved pressure on a vagus branch and that, in turn, relieved the back pain.Here's a picture of the vagus and its branches:
 

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I have my own theory about weird IBS pain and what may cause at least some of it. I have no hard science to back this up and it may sound really lame but here it is:The vagus nerve is one of the largest nerves in our bodies. It wanders (vagus = wander) through multiple organs and organ systems including our guts. I think, at least sometimes, our bloat or some other event physically impinges on a vagus branch and is misinterpreted by our brains as pain somewhere else.There are times when I am having a bad IBS day and I have bad back pain between my shoulders. A pain that "feels" like I have pulled a muscle. Occasionally, if there is the slightest movement or spurt in my guts, the back pain will immediately go away. I wonder if the spurt relieved pressure on a vagus branch and that, in turn, relieved the back pain.Here's a picture of the vagus and its branches:
 

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I was so glad to see these posts. I am suffering with terrible mid back pain...right now after testing,my gastro says it looks like diverticulitis and I am suffering from stomach pain, a gas bubble feeling in my throat and back pain - HELP.
 

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I was so glad to see these posts. I am suffering with terrible mid back pain...right now after testing,my gastro says it looks like diverticulitis and I am suffering from stomach pain, a gas bubble feeling in my throat and back pain - HELP.
 

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I had back surgery 2 years ago which seemed to help my IBS. I think having a BM hurt my back and caused a resonance back and forth irritation? Although my back rarely hurt I suppose sitting was bad for it and sitting used to give me a pretty good case of nausea. I would guess back pain in your case is because the colon is pretty large and wraps around the mid to low back area. You don't want a bad back, but who wants IBS?
 

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I had back surgery 2 years ago which seemed to help my IBS. I think having a BM hurt my back and caused a resonance back and forth irritation? Although my back rarely hurt I suppose sitting was bad for it and sitting used to give me a pretty good case of nausea. I would guess back pain in your case is because the colon is pretty large and wraps around the mid to low back area. You don't want a bad back, but who wants IBS?
 
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