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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I'm new to this board. I have had the symptoms of IBS for about a year now. Ever since I had a really bad case of food poisoning about a year ago. Since then I have exibited all the IBS symptom and they are getting worse. I have been researching alot and just today I discovered an article from Cedars Sinai Med. Center where they did a study of IBS patients and tested them for bacteria in their small intestine. After confirming the bacteria was there they treated these people with antibiotics and in 90 percent of the patients the symptoms and discomfort of IBS have gone away. I would be interested to know if anyone else thinks this could be a treatable bacteria and if your Dr. has confirmed or denied this.
 

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HI JINGLBELLA...While the numbers were not That good since a lot of the test-positive cases never returned for followup, of the ones who did return for followup a signifcant portion reported partial relief following antibiotic therapy with neomycin, and a portion reported remission...I did not go back and pull the study...you can see it posted here elsewhere. A number had to be retreated periodically to maintain the level of relief achieved, but the study does reinforce the existing suspicion that there exists among the "IBS sub- populations" a subpopulation who have demonstrable "bacterial overgrowth" and that a portion of those do respond to therapy with the antibiotic used. That much can certainly be said with comfort.Your history suggests you could be among those, and you could also be among those whose IBS was precipitated by a post-inflammtory event (infection) or among those whose so called IBS was associatyed with antibiotic use from the infection, or from residual antibiotic-resistant infection, or opportunistic infection, which of course could be linked directly to either one of the above or all together or none! Nobody can accurately state which from the info.There is little doubt in my mind that from what you have said, for you it is worth:a) taking a copy of that study to your GI doc and:( if you meet the selection criteria that were used (the doc will look at that) it would be very reasonable for you to request the test be administered to determine if you indeeed could benefit.What is the worst thing that can happen? Nothing....and we are all at some point used to nothing happening. So this is my suggestion.Have a DFD and good-breathing (for the test)MNL_______________ www.leapallergy.com
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Mike. I will definately do this. It is worth a shot. Anything to relieve the symptoms or make them go away completely would be great!
 

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LEW:Hi. There was a thread a couple days ago and I think the abstract was posted over on the NEws & research Board, both under a title like "Bacteria Study" or something. Just look at the last 3-4 days threads and you should see it or go over to the News BoardI don't mean to seem lazy by not goin and diggin it up for ya...just bouncing around alot today and short of timeMNL________________ www.leapallergy.com
 

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LEW...Never mind...it is in pieces-parts all over.Here is the core of it you wanna know anyway:----------------"Cedars-Sinai investigators evaluated 202 patients who underwent a specializedbreath test to determine the presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, acondition in which bacteria typically found in the colon makes its way up into thesmall intestine."The bacteria produces the bowel symptoms. The fact that we found theovergrowth in almost 80 percent of patients with IBS is quite dramatic,"Pimental explained.He noted that there are several mechanisms designed to prevent the build-up ofbacteria in the small intestine, but researchers do not know what goes wrong toallow the bacteria to accumulate.Participants in the study were treated for 10 days with antibiotics, whicheliminated signs of the disease in 25 of the 47 patients who returned forfollow-up exams. Treatment with alternative antibiotics has been effective inabout 90 percent of patients at the Cedars-Sinai clinic, Pimental said.Of the 25 study patients in which no small intestine bacteria was detected aftertreatment with antibiotics, 12 reported no symptoms of IBS and 13 reportedsignificantly reduced symptoms, the researchers said."We are concerned about overtreatment with antibiotics and potential resistanceto antibiotics. We are currently studying other therapies for eliminating thebacteria, but the results so far are not objective," the Cedars-Sinai doctor said.The Cedars-Sinai team, which published its study results in the December issueof The American Journal of Gastroenterology, is currently conducting adouble-blind study comparing treatment with antibiotics to placebo in IBSpatients."_--------------------------So 161 out of 202 tested positive for sign of bacterial overgrowth in small intestine = 80% test positiveActively particpated in followup of 10 day course of antibiotic therapy: 47 (23% of subjects, 29% of test positivie subjects)Test negative after antibiotic course: 25 of 47 (53%)Of these, remission reported by 12 (25% of the test-positive subjects reporting for followup; 48% of the group which responded to antibiotics)Reduced symptoms reported by 13. (Res Ipsa Loquiter)That "90%" number was not quantified in the publication, but was a number quoted by the investigator as representing outcomes int eh clinic using various antibiotic regimens unspecified. The number is fuzzy in the quotation.WHile the numbers hardly point to a revolutionary new therapy, as they are much lower success rates than have been found with other non-pharmacotherapies, they do suggest another form of effective therapy for a specific symptom set may be efficiacious....suggests that there is indeed a subpopulation of patients with IBS symptoms whose symptoms can be linked to bacteria taking up residence in the small intestine where they don't belong and contributing to symptoms, and that some of these patients repsond to antibiotic treatment favorably. The downside is that repeat therapy is necessary and the issue of resistance then arises.It does suggest that patients that meet the symptom-set profile of the test-positive cases should be considered candidates for this testing as a screen, and if test-positive that at least a 50% expectation of benefit from antibiotic therapy is realistic. Right in-line with many other therapies, which have reported symptomologic benefits ranging from 30% to 70% (or 0% if the patient selection criteria are not followed).Therefore one more subpopulation may be helped where this may be appropriate.MNL______________ www.leapallergy.com
 
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