Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HiI'm a new member and enjoy reading all the topics. My problem is I always feel bloated. I am so bloated I don't even have a waistline anymore
. I just began taking acidophilus last week, in hopes this will help my IBS, but I am still a little unsure of the results. I also received my free GNC sample in the mail so I took one of those today. I try to drink water and cut down on the carbonated drinks, but I just feel more bloated. Everyone says drink water, it doesn't seem to work for me. If I take immodium for my D I get even more bloated. I don't have as much G as you think I would, I just look like I am swollen all over. Help !!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
I get up most morning with an almost flat tummy(due to having children will never be competely flat, have that small kangroo pouch going for me..lol) but by most evening I have went up one pant size. Right after the first meal, it starts and continues. Imodium Ad was what was causing my severe stomach pain after I would take it for the D. Took me three er trips to figure that one out, OUCH. If you find a cure for it, let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
I get up most morning with an almost flat tummy(due to having children will never be competely flat, have that small kangroo pouch going for me..lol) but by most evening I have went up one pant size. Right after the first meal, it starts and continues. Imodium Ad was what was causing my severe stomach pain after I would take it for the D. Took me three er trips to figure that one out, OUCH. If you find a cure for it, let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
The doctors are still trying to figure out some of or all of the mechanisms associated with bloating. I think most people think its caused by gas, but in actuality there are other mechanisms involved probably more so then gas. Most IBS studies show normal gas production in IBS, however one I believe did find a slightly higher gas production.Hypnotherapy has a good track record for bloating and distension of around 80 percent.This is specifically on IBS from a top researcher. http://www.ibshypnosis.com/IBSresearch.html They still have a ways to go on figuring out why entirely its doing it in the first place.It is a confusing symptom.Here is one study. Am J Gastroenterol 2001 Apr;96(4):1139-42 Abdominal wall muscle activity in irritable bowel syndrome with bloating. McManis PG, Newall D, Talley NJ. Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Nepean Hospital, NSW, Australia. OBJECTIVE: Recurrent episodes of bloating and visible abdominal distension are common and distressing in irritable bowel syndrome, but the mechanisms are unknown. Patients often note that the distension is most pronounced in the upright posture, suggesting that the bloating may be the result of a decrease or absence of the normal rise in electromyograph activity in the abdominal wall muscles when standing. There are no reports of noninvasive electromyograph recordings of abdominal wall muscles in irritable bowel syndrome. We examined the hypothesis that abdominal distension is the result of relaxation of anterior abdominal wall musculature. METHODS: Studies were performed on patients with irritable bowel syndrome and a history of visible distension (n = 11, mean age 48.6 yr, body mass index 24.8) and normal volunteers (n = 13, mean age 39.9 yr, body mass index 24.6). Surface recordings of muscle activity were made while subjects were lying, performing voluntary contraction of the abdominal wall, and standing. The examiners were blind as to the clinical status of the subjects. RESULTS: There were no differences in abdominal wall muscle activity (by electromyograph voltage) when comparing patients with irritable bowel syndrome to normal volunteers (e.g., relaxed lower abdomen supine mean electromyograph voltage in irritable bowel syndrome was 14.0 vs 14.6 in controls, p = 0.7, and relaxed lower abdomen standing in irritable bowel syndrome was 29.6 vs 25.2 in controls, p = 0.4). There was increased activity in both groups when contracting the muscles and when standing. CONCLUSIONS: Patterns of abdominal wall muscle activity do not differ between normal subjects and patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, there is a clear increase in muscle activity in the standing position. Episodic distension is unlikely to be due to permanent anterior abdominal muscle weakness or a persistent inability of the muscles to activate with standing in irritable bowel syndrome. PMID: 11316160 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
The doctors are still trying to figure out some of or all of the mechanisms associated with bloating. I think most people think its caused by gas, but in actuality there are other mechanisms involved probably more so then gas. Most IBS studies show normal gas production in IBS, however one I believe did find a slightly higher gas production.Hypnotherapy has a good track record for bloating and distension of around 80 percent.This is specifically on IBS from a top researcher. http://www.ibshypnosis.com/IBSresearch.html They still have a ways to go on figuring out why entirely its doing it in the first place.It is a confusing symptom.Here is one study. Am J Gastroenterol 2001 Apr;96(4):1139-42 Abdominal wall muscle activity in irritable bowel syndrome with bloating. McManis PG, Newall D, Talley NJ. Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Nepean Hospital, NSW, Australia. OBJECTIVE: Recurrent episodes of bloating and visible abdominal distension are common and distressing in irritable bowel syndrome, but the mechanisms are unknown. Patients often note that the distension is most pronounced in the upright posture, suggesting that the bloating may be the result of a decrease or absence of the normal rise in electromyograph activity in the abdominal wall muscles when standing. There are no reports of noninvasive electromyograph recordings of abdominal wall muscles in irritable bowel syndrome. We examined the hypothesis that abdominal distension is the result of relaxation of anterior abdominal wall musculature. METHODS: Studies were performed on patients with irritable bowel syndrome and a history of visible distension (n = 11, mean age 48.6 yr, body mass index 24.8) and normal volunteers (n = 13, mean age 39.9 yr, body mass index 24.6). Surface recordings of muscle activity were made while subjects were lying, performing voluntary contraction of the abdominal wall, and standing. The examiners were blind as to the clinical status of the subjects. RESULTS: There were no differences in abdominal wall muscle activity (by electromyograph voltage) when comparing patients with irritable bowel syndrome to normal volunteers (e.g., relaxed lower abdomen supine mean electromyograph voltage in irritable bowel syndrome was 14.0 vs 14.6 in controls, p = 0.7, and relaxed lower abdomen standing in irritable bowel syndrome was 29.6 vs 25.2 in controls, p = 0.4). There was increased activity in both groups when contracting the muscles and when standing. CONCLUSIONS: Patterns of abdominal wall muscle activity do not differ between normal subjects and patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, there is a clear increase in muscle activity in the standing position. Episodic distension is unlikely to be due to permanent anterior abdominal muscle weakness or a persistent inability of the muscles to activate with standing in irritable bowel syndrome. PMID: 11316160 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
This is on impair transit of intestinal gas.Gut 2001 Jan;48(1):14-9 Impaired transit and tolerance of intestinal gas in the irritable bowel syndrome. Serra J, Azpiroz F, Malagelada JR. Digestive System Research Unit, Hospital General Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. BACKGROUND: Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) frequently complain of excessive gas but their fasting volume of intestinal gas is apparently normal. We hypothesised that the pathophysiological mechanism involved may be impairment of intestinal gas transit. AIM: To investigate intestinal gas transit and tolerance in IBS patients compared with healthy subjects. METHODS: A gas mixture (N(2), O(2), and CO(2) in venous proportions) was infused into the jejunum of 20 patients with IBS and 20 healthy controls at 12 ml/min for four hours. Gas evacuation, initially flatus from the anus (two hours) and then intrarectally (two hours), was continuously recorded. Symptom perception (0-6 scale) and abdominal distension were measured at 10 minute intervals. RESULTS: After two hours of external gas (flatus) collection, 18 of 20 IBS patients had developed gas retention (>400 ml), increased gastrointestinal symptoms (score >3), or abdominal distension (>3 mm girth increment) compared with only four of 20 control subjects. During intrarectal gas collection, 13 of 17 patients still exhibited abnormal responses. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of patients with IBS can be shown to have impaired transit and tolerance of intestinal gas loads. This anomaly may represent a possible mechanism of IBS symptoms, specifically pain and bloating. PMID: 11115817 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
This is on impair transit of intestinal gas.Gut 2001 Jan;48(1):14-9 Impaired transit and tolerance of intestinal gas in the irritable bowel syndrome. Serra J, Azpiroz F, Malagelada JR. Digestive System Research Unit, Hospital General Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. BACKGROUND: Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) frequently complain of excessive gas but their fasting volume of intestinal gas is apparently normal. We hypothesised that the pathophysiological mechanism involved may be impairment of intestinal gas transit. AIM: To investigate intestinal gas transit and tolerance in IBS patients compared with healthy subjects. METHODS: A gas mixture (N(2), O(2), and CO(2) in venous proportions) was infused into the jejunum of 20 patients with IBS and 20 healthy controls at 12 ml/min for four hours. Gas evacuation, initially flatus from the anus (two hours) and then intrarectally (two hours), was continuously recorded. Symptom perception (0-6 scale) and abdominal distension were measured at 10 minute intervals. RESULTS: After two hours of external gas (flatus) collection, 18 of 20 IBS patients had developed gas retention (>400 ml), increased gastrointestinal symptoms (score >3), or abdominal distension (>3 mm girth increment) compared with only four of 20 control subjects. During intrarectal gas collection, 13 of 17 patients still exhibited abnormal responses. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of patients with IBS can be shown to have impaired transit and tolerance of intestinal gas loads. This anomaly may represent a possible mechanism of IBS symptoms, specifically pain and bloating. PMID: 11115817 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks LadyM and EricI was beginning to think no one would answer. I appreicate the information Eric. I guess I will just continue on a day to day basis. I am trying to cut back on the immodium, I only take it when I travel, but it seems like it never gets completely out of my system. I also have that kangaroo pooch LadyM, I think we are just destined to have it after childbearing years. See ya
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks LadyM and EricI was beginning to think no one would answer. I appreicate the information Eric. I guess I will just continue on a day to day basis. I am trying to cut back on the immodium, I only take it when I travel, but it seems like it never gets completely out of my system. I also have that kangaroo pooch LadyM, I think we are just destined to have it after childbearing years. See ya
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I get the bloating daily. In the AM I look sort of fit. But by 4 PM the bloating starts. Some days I actually get up to 4 inches on my middle. Diet has helped a lot now I only go up 1 1/2 to 2 inches except weekends and man I am goning to eat then. Sugar for sure swells me up and the gas is amazing. Iced Tea in the afternoon seems to induce it so no caffine for me after 8 am. Experiment with one item at a time by giving it up for a few days. It might surprize you as to what may help. All of us are a little different so root around I bet you fine a little help taht only you could find.Good LuckMikey
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I get the bloating daily. In the AM I look sort of fit. But by 4 PM the bloating starts. Some days I actually get up to 4 inches on my middle. Diet has helped a lot now I only go up 1 1/2 to 2 inches except weekends and man I am goning to eat then. Sugar for sure swells me up and the gas is amazing. Iced Tea in the afternoon seems to induce it so no caffine for me after 8 am. Experiment with one item at a time by giving it up for a few days. It might surprize you as to what may help. All of us are a little different so root around I bet you fine a little help taht only you could find.Good LuckMikey
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top