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Know it very well. Why do you ask, in terms of IBS?As an ex fitness instructor and long time weights trainer, I have my opinions, and own experience. In fact, I wrote an entire commentary on it.I am reluctant to say very much because I know many people see it as the perfect solution, and defend it quite aggressively, and these people, if you say anything about it at all, will attack you as either not doing the program properly, or being jealous, or not thinking postively enough, which is actually part of the entire mindset (and potential pitfall) of this program. All I will say is there *are* IMO, issues with it, that ought to be considered. I in no way slam the program, it has excellent features and ideas, but there are long-term issues with it that short-term users haven't experienced yet.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Unfortunately, being on a strict diet for my IBS, I thought it would be a good way to both get in shape and get back some of the nutrients that I am losing. My doctor said to try it, but take it slow and not work as hard as the program says to. Is there any thing else I could do? I really do need to get in shape, but I don't know how to go about it.Thanks for the advice!!!!!!!!
 

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Ok, since you're open to it, and I do ask that I don't get any flames or any indigant stalwarts who insist, "it worked for me"--I KNOW about these people, and I KNOW it works for people in the short-term, so please, let me add.My thought is the program is too intense for somebody starting out--people do feel great intially, but there's something called overtraining, and whilst the book and the advocates state that overtraining only happens when you spend too long in the gym, that is simply not true. Overtraining is a *cumulative* thing, a combination of both length of time and/or intensity (meaning, how hard you push yourself. Overtraining is also a very individual thing--how long it takes to happen can vary from a few weeks to a few months, depending on your particular constitution. It can show up several weeks down the track, and its symptoms include fatigue, loss of interest in training, difficulty sleeping, general soreness and stiffness, and psychologically, you can just feel depressed and foggy and unmotivated. The BFL program as is encourages people to push through this. I disagree, as your immune system gets compromised. If you are depleted and stressed, from IBS or anything else, then I believe launching into BFL is going to tax your system. So, if you are not familiar with weights, I'd start on a 3 day a week program, one exercise for each body part, and 3 sets of light weights, not training to failure--this will get you sore enough! It takes 6 weeks for your neuro-muscular system to adapt to using weights. If you want to build your health, go for the long term, not the quick fix. The BFL program does not allow for this 'breaking in' period. The dropout rate from BFL is high, because it does burn people out pretty quickly.(and then they wonder what's wrong with them). As for the aerobic component, it may well be true that 20 minutes full-on is good for burning fat, but the thing is, the entire program means you go from exercising 0-? times per week to 6 days per week. The exercise total in itself, leads to burnout. Secondly, BFL relies heavily on Myoplex shakes and supplements. Indeed, people feel that they cant' actually DO the program without them, because the program is cleverly marketed to make you feel that unless you include them, you won't get the results. Now, unless you have digestion problems or just can't be bothered cooking, or happen to like spending exorbitant amounts of money on questionable supplements, there is no need to include these shakes. THERE IS NO MAGIC INGREDIENT in them. I repeat. YOu only have to analyze the ingredients list. By all means, go for shakes if you like them, or find them convenient, but they won't make you lose fat/increase muscle. Where BFL can help though, is the suggestion of eating a portion of protein and a portion of carbs x6 per day, but I think it doesn't pay enough attention to your essential green vegies, and fruit, so the diet as it stands can be devoid of fiber. Hope this helps.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This definitly helps! Thank you soo much. What about suppliments and/or vitamins? I have lost so much weight and feel like I am wasting away. I have no energy and I definitly don't feel I am getting the nutrition that I need. I can use all the help I can get.
 

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See if you tolerate Ensure.Its usually fairly well tolerated and is designed for giving nutrition to people who aren't eating properly and tends to be pretty easy to digest although some people don't tolerate it well.It is available at most pharmacies and discount stores, and some places like Wal~mart have a store brand of it that can save a few $$.I would recommend seeing a Dietician, preferably one who works with IBS patients that can help you add more foods and more nutritious foods to your diet.Often what works for "normal" people may be hard for IBSers to do as the diet is either devoid of something the IBSer may need like fiber, or has too much of things that some IBSers don't tolerate well.Adding an Ensure to each meal you have or drinking it as a between meal snack can help you gain weight and get alot of nutrients. It is what they have cancer patients or people with inflamatory bowel diseases drink to keep up the nutrition when eating is problematic.K.------------------I have no financial, academic, or any other stake in any commercial product mentioned by me.My story and what worked for me in greatly easing my IBS: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum17/HTML/000015.html
 

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I agree with Kmottus wise advice about seeing dietician for your needs.Again, your post indicates to me that gently does it. Think long term.If you are feeling depleted, I would be going VERY gently on a weights program, and probably skip the cardio training altogether--you sound like you don't have the juice. Some initial, mild weights will help 'build you up', esp if you have wasted somewhat. But really, really listen to your body--my recommendation of 3 sets per exercise may still be too much for you at this stage--so just do 2. I am VERY aware that any gym you go to will immediately try and put you on a starters 'program'that consists of more than this. My experience as an instructor and one who has suffered much due to exercise is the following: most exercise routines devised by 'experts'and gym instructors are a case of too much, too soon. I believe in easing in very gently, in fact, underexercising rather than risk overdoing it. You will still see gains in strength and tone, not to mention develop some confidence.to maintain motivation, you must always leave a session feeling like you could've done 'just a little bit more'. Why? Because the only way to achieve success is to feel successful. So, under-exercise rather than feel puffed, tired, or just like you don't want to carry on anymore. Because leaving the gym like this, you will carry with you the memory that it was more effort than it was worth, and you won't go back. When you feel successful, (and not burned out by that) you're more likely to enjoy going back.Try and adopt an attitude of curiosity and 'play', as in 'so this is how it feels to move my arm with resistance' rather than serious grunt, groan, have to shape up or else. You'll stick with it longer.(and long term is what counts, not shape up for summer).Think health.BTW, I built myself back up from anorexia with starting out this way.DO listen to your body.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks K. I did try Ensure once when I had my wisdom teeth out. I seemed to handle it ok. It just seems now, everything makes my stomach hurt. I keep passing back and forth from C to D and I went from a size 7 to 3 in one month. Just a little worried. I don't want to get more sick than I already am. That's why I want to try a work out program. Maybe it will help my digestion.Anyway, I will definitly try that, and thanks again!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am going to start Monday! Thanks for all the advice. You don't know how good if feels to talk to someone about this, esp some one who has been through it! Wish me luck.
 

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I just read your anorexia post, so this is in response to that post and this one.First of all, I am not in your position. I also have acid reflux, and if I don't eat every couple of hours, I get horrible stomach pains. But when the IBS acts up, this is difficult, so I do have sympathy for you.Anyway, about Body for Life. My friend, who also has bad acid reflux, was all set to have surgery on her esophogus. Then she went for a second opinion, and with her doctor's help, is doing very well using this lifestyle to manage her acid reflux. After only three months on it, she is able to skip the surgery. I have also read some success stories on this BB about this lifestyle too.I don't know the details on it, but I know my friend eats six very small meals a day, and that is how I have managed my IBS for a couple of years now. Here's a typical day for me: Breakfast, small bowl of puffed wheat cereal with a little milk or a 1/4 cup of oatmeal; Midmorning, banana; Lunch, half a sandwich, or soup and a piece of toast, or mashed potatoes; Midafternoon, applesauce or toast; Supper, a little meat sometimes with veggies and rice, or lentils and rice, or a little pasta; Evening snack, air-popped popcorn.My IBS had a big flare-up a few years back and I lost almost 60 pounds. Changing my eating habits to six small meals a day helped me maintain a healthy weight and avoid flare-ups. I still get D 3-5 times a week, but that's better than 3-5 times a day like it used to be!I have also recently read that "grazing" like this is how our systems were meant to work. This whole "three meal a day" thing is hard on normal people's systems, so imagine how bad it is for IBSers.And your friends and family will get used to your eating habits. When I go out to lunch with friends, I order mashed potatoes. I got a lot of funny looks at first! But now they don't even notice. They know that my only choices are eat mashed potatoes or stay home.Anyway, I hope you can find some foods that you can tolerate. If you can eat a couple of hundred calories at each of 6 small meals, you'll be on your way and you can work up from there. Good luck, I hope you feel better soon.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I am trying the six meals a day now. It is really hard to get used to. But I am learning. I managed to eat a Boca burger and fries today, and so far so good, no pain. I will try to eat a little more tonight. I do have one more question. Will this ever go away??
 

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IBS can go into remission, but it is hard to predict who will and who won't. I've heard 5% of all IBSers/year will go into remission. So each year you have a small chance of going into remission. Even if it doesn't go away, most people can find things that make it more managable and we do seem to have the attention of the drug companies at the moment so there are drugs in development.K.------------------I have no financial, academic, or any other stake in any commercial product mentioned by me.My story and what worked for me in greatly easing my IBS: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum17/HTML/000015.html
 

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I intend to go on this program next week. I have spent almost a year changing my diet and adding a weekly exercise program. I have had absolutely no change to my weight but my overall health and strength seem to be better. I intend to follow the program to suit my needs. I do not believe you have to follow the program to a "T", in fact I think it is pretty much impossible. It is basically a good guideline for changing your lifestyle and I believe you should go along at your own pace. I disagree with a lot of his diet choices, I personally think he injests too many chemicals and not enough fat for a long term diet plan. One does not need to use the Myoplex, a good protein shake that doesn't bother the tummy is fine. I know of 3 people who have had great results from the program but tailored it to their needs. Good luck with this!
 
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