Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For me, I obsess over my IBS. I can literally feel it in my head all the time. I know that I am thinking about it but I don't know how to stop it or what caused it. But I know my brain is thinking about it. What I am curious to know is if there is a correlation with IBS obsession and a part of the brain that causes it. For instance, I know there is a part of our brains that is responsible for performing math. And how the right side controls motor skills of the left side. My goal is to know where these IBS thoughts are occuring and to try to use that same part of my brain for another task at the moment when the thought hits. Does this make sense? I guess its similar to pee fright where people say to do simple math when you can pee in a urinal. Is there something for IBS?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Tmar, this is quite complex but a good question.It maybe hard to understand also at first.One thing you mention on the math, is because of using distraction the math distracts the brain.The prefrontal cortex is involved in this and a region of the brain asocciated with anxiety, attension, but also to pain.All pain is processed in the brain.Hence one reason pain and anxiety can go together and anxiety can make ppain worse.I will come back to this for you, I have spent a great deal of time on all this,especially in how this realtes also to pain and IBS, bt also anxiety and "thoughts" but also read the thread changing your thoughts. This thread is specifically on this and aspects of it. http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php...ic;f=1;t=039268 Irritable Bowel SyndromeClinical Issues Adapted from a radio interview conducted by Bob Enteen, host of Living Without Limits, with Douglas Drossman, MD, UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders at Chapel Hill North Carolina "What would be an example of new understanding?Well one example is that we're starting to understand how the brain is responding to the pain in IBS. There have been some studies done where they've artificially created a kind of an irritable bowel by placing a balloon to stretch the bowel, and that produces pain. Then they've compared people with IBS to non-IBS, or "normal" individuals. And what they've found is that when you stretch the bowel-and use PET scans to monitor the response-in normal individuals, certain areas of the brain that register pain respond and release chemicals called neurotransmitters that suppress and lower the pain. But it seems that doesn't happen as well in people with IBS. In fact, in people with IBS another area of the brain responds that is associated with anxiety. So what we find is that people with IBS, aside from having a bowel problem, may have some difficulty in terms of the way their brain is regulating the pain." http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/clinicalIssues.html This is an IBS fmri scan. The prefrontal cortex and the ACC Anterior Cinculate Cortex.The ACC is involved in sending messages to release endorphines in the gut so you don't feel things.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome at a Glance - Nosology, Epidemiology, and Pathophysiology (Monograph I)Foundation for Digestive Health and Nutrition (FDHN) and the American Gastroenterological Association.Brain PhysiologyStress reproducibly alters gastrointestinal motility and sensation. The release of corticotropin releasing factor from the hypothalamus may mediate the stress response. Brain centers important in mediating visceral pain include the thalamus (general sensory), insular cortex (visceral sensory), anterior cingulate cortex (general pain awareness), and prefrontal cortex (general pain processing). Visceral pain in IBS is associated with increased prefrontal cortex activation. The normal correlation between subjective pain intensity and activation of the anterior cingulate and insula cortices is lost in IBS. The limbic system is involved in emotion, mood, and visceral autonomic control. Limbic abnormalities are seen in depression and IBS. Thus, this system is a possible site of convergence where emotional disturbance provokes intestinal dysfunction. http://www.fdhn.org/html/education/gi/ibs_nosology.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Tmar, this is quite complex but a good question.It maybe hard to understand also at first.One thing you mention on the math, is because of using distraction the math distracts the brain.The prefrontal cortex is involved in this and a region of the brain asocciated with anxiety, attension, but also to pain.All pain is processed in the brain.Hence one reason pain and anxiety can go together and anxiety can make ppain worse.I will come back to this for you, I have spent a great deal of time on all this,especially in how this realtes also to pain and IBS, bt also anxiety and "thoughts" but also read the thread changing your thoughts. This thread is specifically on this and aspects of it. http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php...ic;f=1;t=039268 Irritable Bowel SyndromeClinical Issues Adapted from a radio interview conducted by Bob Enteen, host of Living Without Limits, with Douglas Drossman, MD, UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders at Chapel Hill North Carolina "What would be an example of new understanding?Well one example is that we're starting to understand how the brain is responding to the pain in IBS. There have been some studies done where they've artificially created a kind of an irritable bowel by placing a balloon to stretch the bowel, and that produces pain. Then they've compared people with IBS to non-IBS, or "normal" individuals. And what they've found is that when you stretch the bowel-and use PET scans to monitor the response-in normal individuals, certain areas of the brain that register pain respond and release chemicals called neurotransmitters that suppress and lower the pain. But it seems that doesn't happen as well in people with IBS. In fact, in people with IBS another area of the brain responds that is associated with anxiety. So what we find is that people with IBS, aside from having a bowel problem, may have some difficulty in terms of the way their brain is regulating the pain." http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/clinicalIssues.html This is an IBS fmri scan. The prefrontal cortex and the ACC Anterior Cinculate Cortex.The ACC is involved in sending messages to release endorphines in the gut so you don't feel things.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome at a Glance - Nosology, Epidemiology, and Pathophysiology (Monograph I)Foundation for Digestive Health and Nutrition (FDHN) and the American Gastroenterological Association.Brain PhysiologyStress reproducibly alters gastrointestinal motility and sensation. The release of corticotropin releasing factor from the hypothalamus may mediate the stress response. Brain centers important in mediating visceral pain include the thalamus (general sensory), insular cortex (visceral sensory), anterior cingulate cortex (general pain awareness), and prefrontal cortex (general pain processing). Visceral pain in IBS is associated with increased prefrontal cortex activation. The normal correlation between subjective pain intensity and activation of the anterior cingulate and insula cortices is lost in IBS. The limbic system is involved in emotion, mood, and visceral autonomic control. Limbic abnormalities are seen in depression and IBS. Thus, this system is a possible site of convergence where emotional disturbance provokes intestinal dysfunction. http://www.fdhn.org/html/education/gi/ibs_nosology.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've been reading about areas of the brain and the Anterior Cingulate Gyru is pretty much the focal point of where this all stems. I have a lunch meeting at noon and I will be driving to NYC with my friend's parents later on today and I am obsessing over the fact that I may have to go to the bathroom with these people around when there is no bathroom around. I can literally feel the thoughts in my head.WorryingOveractivity in the cingulate is often associated with worrying, or getting locked into negative thoughts that you think about over and over. Something upsets you and you can't let go of it, or you have a "future concern" which recycles through your brain. Even though we all worry at times (and some worry is necessary to keep us working or studying in school), people who have an overactive cingulate may have worrying as part of their personality. They may worry to the point of causing emotional and physical harm to themselves. Whenever you have repetitive negative concerns that circle through your mind it can cause tension, stress, stomachaches, headaches and irritability. Chronically expressing worries often irritates others and makes a person look less powerful and perhaps even less mature. http://www.brainplace.com/bp/brainsystem/cingulate.asp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've been reading about areas of the brain and the Anterior Cingulate Gyru is pretty much the focal point of where this all stems. I have a lunch meeting at noon and I will be driving to NYC with my friend's parents later on today and I am obsessing over the fact that I may have to go to the bathroom with these people around when there is no bathroom around. I can literally feel the thoughts in my head.WorryingOveractivity in the cingulate is often associated with worrying, or getting locked into negative thoughts that you think about over and over. Something upsets you and you can't let go of it, or you have a "future concern" which recycles through your brain. Even though we all worry at times (and some worry is necessary to keep us working or studying in school), people who have an overactive cingulate may have worrying as part of their personality. They may worry to the point of causing emotional and physical harm to themselves. Whenever you have repetitive negative concerns that circle through your mind it can cause tension, stress, stomachaches, headaches and irritability. Chronically expressing worries often irritates others and makes a person look less powerful and perhaps even less mature. http://www.brainplace.com/bp/brainsystem/cingulate.asp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
But.... the ? is ..." HOw do you stop these the thoughts?? How do you stop obsessing about IBS D? YOu cannot shut your brain off(unless you go under anesthesia!) and that is what it would take for me. I wake up thinking about if I am going to have a bad flare up and go to bed thinking if tomorrow will be a 10 toliet visit day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
But.... the ? is ..." HOw do you stop these the thoughts?? How do you stop obsessing about IBS D? YOu cannot shut your brain off(unless you go under anesthesia!) and that is what it would take for me. I wake up thinking about if I am going to have a bad flare up and go to bed thinking if tomorrow will be a 10 toliet visit day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah I wish there was an ON/OFF switch for the brain-gut connection but there isn't. The only thing I can think of is distracting the brain by overloading that part of the brain with non-IBS thoughts :/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah I wish there was an ON/OFF switch for the brain-gut connection but there isn't. The only thing I can think of is distracting the brain by overloading that part of the brain with non-IBS thoughts :/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Read the whole changing your thoughts thread. That is exactly what the thread is about in regards to IBS.Distracvtion is good, but there are many ways. A lot of which can be combined.On thing about this is it requires work, time and effort and a person has to work on it full heartedly to make changes. It does not just happen. Sometimes with professional help and maybe medications if the person can not do it alone. Education is also a big part of all this in understanding first.But"Coping MechanismsAlthough stress is an inevitable fact of life, not all stress is negative. The stress of meeting a deadline, for example, may be a positive force because it can spur on someone to achieve important goals. Prolonged, unrelieved stress, however, poses a potential health threat. Such chronic stress is thought to raise the risk of hypertension, heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, back pain, and depression as well as increase one's susceptibility to infection.How we handle stress determines its impact, and the key to managing stress is to develop effective coping mechanisms. An important first step is to recognize that anxiety, tension, and fear are normal after a terrifying event. Some of the most effective strategies for coping with these emotions are to:� share your feelings with friends, family, and/or members of a support group to learn how others have coped;� keep a diary recounting your reactions to gain better insight into your concerns and emotional patterns;� re-establish familiar habits and your usual daily routine as soon as possible to restore a sense of normalcy;� watch, read, or listen to news coverage of the event to gain a better understanding of the circumstances surrounding it;� exercise regularly and/or practice relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation, or deep-breathing exercises (you might also try reading, listening to music, or pursuing an enjoyable hobby such as gardening or painting); and� maintain your immune system by eating well-balanced meals, exercising regularly, and getting sufficient sleep to prevent illness. However, excessive exposure to and preoccupation with a terrifying event can be counterproductive. It's a good idea, for example, to limit the viewing of graphic images and to curb discussion of the event after topics related to it have been thoroughly explored.According to a recent study, exposure to passive stress (stressful events to which you have no other way to respond than passive endurance) can have a rapid and strong suppressive effect on some elements of the immune response, impairing your ability to fight off infection. Interestingly, active stressful events, such as memorizing information for a test or working to meet a deadline, seem to boost immune system function.Alcohol use has reportedly increased in New York and Washington, D.C., as well as in 13 other states since the September 11 attacks. A Nielsen survey also detected a similar spike in snack foods, with sales up more than 12% last September compared with the previous year. Although the inclination to have a couple of martinis or scarf down some brownies when under stress is understandable, it is a mistake to rely on alcohol or comfort food as a means of coping with stress. Destructive behaviors such as overindulgence in alcohol, caffeine, or smoking can magnify the effects of stress and may even contribute to sustained increases in blood pressure. A better approach to calming your anxiety might involve going for a walk, reading, or watching a movie.When to Seek Professional HelpMost people are able to handle increased stress by talking with friends, joining a support group, or using various relaxation techniques. If, however, you are feeling overwhelming nervousness or lingering sadness, are obsessed with a traumatic event and unable to move on, or are experiencing anxiety that is having an adverse impact on your work and personal relationships, you should seek help from a mental health professional such as a psychologist or psychiatrist. Both specialists are qualified to treat people with mental and emotional disorders, but only a psychiatrist is a practicing physician.For acute anxiety occurring in response to recent events�so-called episodic anxiety�your doctor may prescribe one of the benzodiazepines, such as diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), or alprazolam (Xanax). These drugs work very rapidly (within minutes) to alleviate symptoms of anxiety, but because they are potentially addicting, they should not be taken for more than about two weeks.When anxiety is part of an underlying disorder such as depression or a generalized anxiety disorder, your doctor may recommend one of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine (Prozac) or paroxetine (Paxil), or another antidepressant to alleviate your symptoms. Such drugs may take up to six weeks to achieve their full therapeutic effect.If you are unable to fall asleep or keep waking up because of anxiety, you might try such steps as taking a hot bath, reading, and using various relaxation techniques to ease your sleeping problems before seeking medication. If these measures fail to relieve your insomnia, however, your doctor may prescribe an agent such as zaleplon (Sonata), zolpidem (Ambien), or temazepam (Restoril) for short-term use. These drugs are used as a bridge to normal sleep and should only be taken for about two weeks or so.Some people who suffer severe symptoms for more than a month and repeatedly relive the ordeal in flashbacks or nightmares may have PTSD and should seek help from a psychologist or psychiatrist. Several studies have shown that PTSD can be treated effectively with antidepressant medications such as sertraline (Zoloft) and various psychological approaches, including cognitive-behavior therapy, anxiety management, and exposure therapy." http://www.hopkinsafter50.com/html/silos/a...ucingstress.php
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Read the whole changing your thoughts thread. That is exactly what the thread is about in regards to IBS.Distracvtion is good, but there are many ways. A lot of which can be combined.On thing about this is it requires work, time and effort and a person has to work on it full heartedly to make changes. It does not just happen. Sometimes with professional help and maybe medications if the person can not do it alone. Education is also a big part of all this in understanding first.But"Coping MechanismsAlthough stress is an inevitable fact of life, not all stress is negative. The stress of meeting a deadline, for example, may be a positive force because it can spur on someone to achieve important goals. Prolonged, unrelieved stress, however, poses a potential health threat. Such chronic stress is thought to raise the risk of hypertension, heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, back pain, and depression as well as increase one's susceptibility to infection.How we handle stress determines its impact, and the key to managing stress is to develop effective coping mechanisms. An important first step is to recognize that anxiety, tension, and fear are normal after a terrifying event. Some of the most effective strategies for coping with these emotions are to:� share your feelings with friends, family, and/or members of a support group to learn how others have coped;� keep a diary recounting your reactions to gain better insight into your concerns and emotional patterns;� re-establish familiar habits and your usual daily routine as soon as possible to restore a sense of normalcy;� watch, read, or listen to news coverage of the event to gain a better understanding of the circumstances surrounding it;� exercise regularly and/or practice relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation, or deep-breathing exercises (you might also try reading, listening to music, or pursuing an enjoyable hobby such as gardening or painting); and� maintain your immune system by eating well-balanced meals, exercising regularly, and getting sufficient sleep to prevent illness. However, excessive exposure to and preoccupation with a terrifying event can be counterproductive. It's a good idea, for example, to limit the viewing of graphic images and to curb discussion of the event after topics related to it have been thoroughly explored.According to a recent study, exposure to passive stress (stressful events to which you have no other way to respond than passive endurance) can have a rapid and strong suppressive effect on some elements of the immune response, impairing your ability to fight off infection. Interestingly, active stressful events, such as memorizing information for a test or working to meet a deadline, seem to boost immune system function.Alcohol use has reportedly increased in New York and Washington, D.C., as well as in 13 other states since the September 11 attacks. A Nielsen survey also detected a similar spike in snack foods, with sales up more than 12% last September compared with the previous year. Although the inclination to have a couple of martinis or scarf down some brownies when under stress is understandable, it is a mistake to rely on alcohol or comfort food as a means of coping with stress. Destructive behaviors such as overindulgence in alcohol, caffeine, or smoking can magnify the effects of stress and may even contribute to sustained increases in blood pressure. A better approach to calming your anxiety might involve going for a walk, reading, or watching a movie.When to Seek Professional HelpMost people are able to handle increased stress by talking with friends, joining a support group, or using various relaxation techniques. If, however, you are feeling overwhelming nervousness or lingering sadness, are obsessed with a traumatic event and unable to move on, or are experiencing anxiety that is having an adverse impact on your work and personal relationships, you should seek help from a mental health professional such as a psychologist or psychiatrist. Both specialists are qualified to treat people with mental and emotional disorders, but only a psychiatrist is a practicing physician.For acute anxiety occurring in response to recent events�so-called episodic anxiety�your doctor may prescribe one of the benzodiazepines, such as diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), or alprazolam (Xanax). These drugs work very rapidly (within minutes) to alleviate symptoms of anxiety, but because they are potentially addicting, they should not be taken for more than about two weeks.When anxiety is part of an underlying disorder such as depression or a generalized anxiety disorder, your doctor may recommend one of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine (Prozac) or paroxetine (Paxil), or another antidepressant to alleviate your symptoms. Such drugs may take up to six weeks to achieve their full therapeutic effect.If you are unable to fall asleep or keep waking up because of anxiety, you might try such steps as taking a hot bath, reading, and using various relaxation techniques to ease your sleeping problems before seeking medication. If these measures fail to relieve your insomnia, however, your doctor may prescribe an agent such as zaleplon (Sonata), zolpidem (Ambien), or temazepam (Restoril) for short-term use. These drugs are used as a bridge to normal sleep and should only be taken for about two weeks or so.Some people who suffer severe symptoms for more than a month and repeatedly relive the ordeal in flashbacks or nightmares may have PTSD and should seek help from a psychologist or psychiatrist. Several studies have shown that PTSD can be treated effectively with antidepressant medications such as sertraline (Zoloft) and various psychological approaches, including cognitive-behavior therapy, anxiety management, and exposure therapy." http://www.hopkinsafter50.com/html/silos/a...ucingstress.php
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Eric, I read your post on Changing thoughts a few times all the way through and it makes plenty of sense. I constantly tell myself that I am perfectly fine now because I am not in the stressful situation but it's hard to take my mind off of it. I tend to just fall back into those thoughts. Most of the time I know I'm thinking about it but if you asked me what I am thinking about I wouldn't know how to answer. It's weird. It's a feeling I have that's almost indescribable. I know I'm thinking about my gut but I don't know why. Besides fearing a loss of control of my bowels, I don't really understand why I constantly think of it and make it so unbearable. Right now I'm thinking of it and it's not even lunch time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Eric, I read your post on Changing thoughts a few times all the way through and it makes plenty of sense. I constantly tell myself that I am perfectly fine now because I am not in the stressful situation but it's hard to take my mind off of it. I tend to just fall back into those thoughts. Most of the time I know I'm thinking about it but if you asked me what I am thinking about I wouldn't know how to answer. It's weird. It's a feeling I have that's almost indescribable. I know I'm thinking about my gut but I don't know why. Besides fearing a loss of control of my bowels, I don't really understand why I constantly think of it and make it so unbearable. Right now I'm thinking of it and it's not even lunch time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Part of this is understanding that fight or flight meahanism, a threat to the organisms, you being the organisms.
The opposite is the relaxation responce, not just mentally but physically too. I know exactly what your talking about, you don't have to describe it to me, because I have gone through it big time. It will evenm make pain worse and can help triggered the d and long term contribute to constipation.Try this distraction technique. And again it take practice and you might have to do it for a while to get really good at it, but give it some time and try to work on it."Practice in reprogramming thoughts has two beneficial effects. Itcalms down the anticipatory fear you have before your visit, andmakes it easier to calm yourself down at the office. It�s much easierto recall secure and realistic thoughts if you�ve taken the time to usethem before. You can have them at your fingertips or the tip of yourtongue, ready to use while you�re in the chair.Another excellent method for stopping racing thoughts is objectivity- the process of thinking of something measurable and verifiable.This is a great technique to use, when you�re stuck "in the chair."Think about your automobile and picture every detail - interior andexterior colors, number of doors, the shape of the door handles, allthe indicators on the dashboard, the type of fabric on the seats.The list is endless. If you don�t own an automobile, think of aspecific room in your home. Think about the size of the room -length, width, height of the ceiling, how the furniture is placed, thecolors, lamps and all other accessories. It�s a fact that we can onlyhave a single thought in a single instant. Describing in your mind(thinking about) an object or objects that are familiar to you doesn�tgive the mind a chance to harbor racing, upsetting thoughts. Fearthoughts are persistent and they will try to sneak back in. Whenthey do, simply bring your attention (your thoughts) back todescribing your chosen object or place."Its important also the last sentence."Fearthoughts are persistent and they will try to sneak back in. Whenthey do, simply bring your attention (your thoughts) back todescribing your chosen object or place."You can do this with anything, one of my favorite is space travel, I just imange my own super cool spaceship every detail and crew and traveling anywhere in the universe I want and making up anything I want too. Try to become totally absorbed in this, which is a little harder at work of course. There is also focusing just on work when your at work.The signals from the gut will try to persist also in anxiety and racing thoughts and mind chatter, and acknowledge that is what it is to yourself, mind chatter, the more focused the less mind chattered and the more clearer thinking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Part of this is understanding that fight or flight meahanism, a threat to the organisms, you being the organisms.
The opposite is the relaxation responce, not just mentally but physically too. I know exactly what your talking about, you don't have to describe it to me, because I have gone through it big time. It will evenm make pain worse and can help triggered the d and long term contribute to constipation.Try this distraction technique. And again it take practice and you might have to do it for a while to get really good at it, but give it some time and try to work on it."Practice in reprogramming thoughts has two beneficial effects. Itcalms down the anticipatory fear you have before your visit, andmakes it easier to calm yourself down at the office. It�s much easierto recall secure and realistic thoughts if you�ve taken the time to usethem before. You can have them at your fingertips or the tip of yourtongue, ready to use while you�re in the chair.Another excellent method for stopping racing thoughts is objectivity- the process of thinking of something measurable and verifiable.This is a great technique to use, when you�re stuck "in the chair."Think about your automobile and picture every detail - interior andexterior colors, number of doors, the shape of the door handles, allthe indicators on the dashboard, the type of fabric on the seats.The list is endless. If you don�t own an automobile, think of aspecific room in your home. Think about the size of the room -length, width, height of the ceiling, how the furniture is placed, thecolors, lamps and all other accessories. It�s a fact that we can onlyhave a single thought in a single instant. Describing in your mind(thinking about) an object or objects that are familiar to you doesn�tgive the mind a chance to harbor racing, upsetting thoughts. Fearthoughts are persistent and they will try to sneak back in. Whenthey do, simply bring your attention (your thoughts) back todescribing your chosen object or place."Its important also the last sentence."Fearthoughts are persistent and they will try to sneak back in. Whenthey do, simply bring your attention (your thoughts) back todescribing your chosen object or place."You can do this with anything, one of my favorite is space travel, I just imange my own super cool spaceship every detail and crew and traveling anywhere in the universe I want and making up anything I want too. Try to become totally absorbed in this, which is a little harder at work of course. There is also focusing just on work when your at work.The signals from the gut will try to persist also in anxiety and racing thoughts and mind chatter, and acknowledge that is what it is to yourself, mind chatter, the more focused the less mind chattered and the more clearer thinking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Keep this in mind on all this and learn about Psychophysiological arousal , what it is and what it means to IBSers, both physically (physiological) and mentally, which effects physiological.Negative thoughts and reactions, cause negative chemical and electrical reactions and positive thoughts, cause positive chemical and electrical reactions. This is how the body works for everyone, but really important in IBS.""Psychophysiological arousal is at the core of treating functional GI disorders. There is so much distress, anxiety, antisipatory anxiety, and negative reaction to symptoms, that calming the Mind and body often makes a significant difference in symptoms."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
Keep this in mind on all this and learn about Psychophysiological arousal , what it is and what it means to IBSers, both physically (physiological) and mentally, which effects physiological.Negative thoughts and reactions, cause negative chemical and electrical reactions and positive thoughts, cause positive chemical and electrical reactions. This is how the body works for everyone, but really important in IBS.""Psychophysiological arousal is at the core of treating functional GI disorders. There is so much distress, anxiety, antisipatory anxiety, and negative reaction to symptoms, that calming the Mind and body often makes a significant difference in symptoms."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
All this advice! Thanks so much. I will keep trying to think positive and not let this anxiety get to me. I just got back from lunch with 2 of my coworkers. I was freaking out about it all morning and about 3 minutes after we sat down at the restaurant. Then I settled down once I was talking and involved in conversation. I was fine for the rest of the time and ate a delicious grilled chicken wrap. I'm fine now, relaxed, comfortable. I have to go into NYC later and its beautiful out so the drive should be really nice! and I will be seeing a friend whom i havent seen in months! thinking positive!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
All this advice! Thanks so much. I will keep trying to think positive and not let this anxiety get to me. I just got back from lunch with 2 of my coworkers. I was freaking out about it all morning and about 3 minutes after we sat down at the restaurant. Then I settled down once I was talking and involved in conversation. I was fine for the rest of the time and ate a delicious grilled chicken wrap. I'm fine now, relaxed, comfortable. I have to go into NYC later and its beautiful out so the drive should be really nice! and I will be seeing a friend whom i havent seen in months! thinking positive!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,788 Posts
A couple famous stress qoutes."worrying about something does not change the outcome."And "stress everyone knows what it is and no one knows what it is."On the first one however with IBS, worrying can possibly contribute to the outcome. Negatively. But as you saw when you went to launch, the worrying was just using up your energies, and the final outcome was okay.
Say hello to the big apple for me, I get homesick when I hear its a nice day in NY. I need to come visit again soon one day.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top