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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
anyone know anything about this article?tomBrain-gut interaction in irritable bowel syndrome: new findings of a multicomponent disease model. Author(s): Schmulson,M.J. Journal Title/Publication: Isr Med Assoc J Year/Volume/Issue/Number: 2001 ; VOL 3; ISSUE 2; Page Range: 104-110 Language: English File Size: 0.6 mb Abstract:Knowledge on the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome has evolved, beginning with disturbances in motility to visceral hypersensitivity, and ultimately to alterations in brain-gut bi-directional communication, where neurotransmitters such as serotonin play a key role. Recently, a multicomponent disease model that integrates all these alterations was proposed. This model is divided into physiological, cognitive, emotional and behavioral components that explain the gastrointestinal as well as the constitutional symptoms. In recent years there has been an explosion of research together with new developments in pharmacological treatments for IBS that support each component of this model. This review presents recent data in favor of these alterations in IBS.
 

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Tom, I don't have access to the full text on that.This is what its refering to though.This is the current model on IBS.Annu Rev Med 2001;52:319-38 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Irritable bowel syndrome. Ringel Y, Sperber AD, Drossman DA. UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7080, USA. ringel###med.unc.edu The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder whose hallmark is abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a change in the consistency or frequency of stools. In the western world, 8% to 23% of adults have IBS and its socioeconomic cost is substantial. Research-generated insights have led to the understanding of IBS as a disorder of brain-gut regulation. The experience of symptoms derives from dysregulation of the bidirectional communication system between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain, mediated by neuroendocrine and immunological factors and modulated by psychosocial factors. The biopsychosocial model integrates the various physical and psychosocial factors that contribute to the patient's illness. This model and the recently revised symptom-based criteria (i.e. the "Rome II criteria") form the basis for establishing a comprehensive and effective approach for the diagnosis and management of the disorder. Publication Types: Review Review, academic PMID: 11160782 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i'm sure the whole article goes into it further (i would hope), but CBT and hypnosis appear to act analogously to medications that act on serotonin levels in the same way at the the same places in the brain and I would think in the gut (even though anyone would be speculating on thei latter). CBT, for example, has been shown to produce changes in the same area of the brain that are identical to the changes produced by anti-depressants in the same area. I know I'm struggling here but I'm trying to figure out how to explain a lot of complicated things in an understandable way. I don't mind if someone wants to backchannel me on this. tom
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Tom,I think one of the problems with the understanding of IBS is the 'new language' of the medical professionals that sufferers have to try and understand if they are to have any hope of understanding the condition.We are encouraged to take responsibility for our own health and well being and yet the vast majority of readers here will not be of clinical orientation.Therefore the more we find out, the less we seem to know.Hypnosis certainly can be measured to have effects in the brain, with changes in chemical releases and electrical impulses, causing us the feelings and emotions that we have as human beings.Eric posted some articles a few months agoabout brain locations and stimulations in IBS/non IBS patinets under hypnosis.I m no good at searches, perhaps someone else will find it or Eric when he reads this.Hope your wellBest RegardsMike
 

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I think this article is on the model of IBS as a whole and all the factors that play into the condition, both of the mind and body(the circuitry really). I think it then goes on to explain the current ways to manage IBS, both pharmologically and with mind body techniques, specifically Hypnosis and CBT.But, its more on the circuitry involved as they try to understand it I believe.As for hypnosis however, I now one area of study is into the Pet Scans of IBS and Pet Scans of Hypnosis. This I believe will be a very promising area of study.For example things like this:[Positron emission tomography to study central pain integration].Rev Neurol (Paris) 2000 Apr;156(4):341-51 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut [Positron emission tomography to study central pain integration]. [Article in French] Laurent B, Peyron R, Garcia Larrea L, Mauguiere F. Service de Neurologie de Saint-Etienne et Centre stephanois de la douleur, Lyon, France. The study of pain integration, in vivo, within the human brain has been largely improved by the functional neuro-imaging techniques available for about 10 years. Positron Emission Tomography (PET), complemented by laser evoked potentials (LEP) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) can nowadays generate maps of physiological or neuropathic pain-related brain activity. LEP and fMRI complement PET by their better temporal resolution and the possibility of individual subject analyze. Recent advances in our knowledge of pain mechanisms concern physiological acute pain, neuropathic pain and investigation of analgesic mechanisms. The sixteen studies using PET have demonstrated pain-related activations in thalamus, insula/SII, anterior cingulate and posterior parietal cortices Activity in right pre-frontal and posterior parietal cortices, anterior cingulate and thalami can be modulated by attention (hypnosis, chronic pain, diversion, selective attention to pain) and probably subserve attentional processes rather than pain analysis. Responses in insula/SII cortex presumably subserve discriminative aspects of pain perception while SI cortex is particularly involved in particular aspects of pain discrimination (movement, contact.) In patients, neuropathic pain, angina and atypical facial pain result in PET abnormalities whose significance remain obscure but which are localized in thalamus and anterior cingulate cortices suggesting their distribution is not random while discriminative responses remain detectable in insula/SII. Drug or stimulation induced analgesia are associated with normalization of basal thalamic abnormalities associated with many chronic pains. The need to investigate the significance of these responses, their neuro-chemical correlates (PET), their time course, the individual strategies by which they have been generated by correlating PET data with LEP and fMRI results, are the challenges that remain to be addressed in the next few years by physicians and researchers. To advance our knowledge of the mechanisms generating both abnormal pain and analgesia (drugs and surgical techniques) in patients is the main motivation of such anexciting challenge. Publication Types: Review Review, tutorial PMID: 10795010 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Anesthesiology 2000 May;92(5):1257-67 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Neural mechanisms of antinociceptive effects of hypnosis. Faymonville ME, Laureys S, Degueldre C, DelFiore G, Luxen A, Franck G, Lamy M, Maquet P. Departments of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and Neurology, and the Cyclotron Research Centre, University Hospital of Liege, Liege, Belgium. anesrea###ulg.ac.be BACKGROUND: The neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain perception by hypnosis remain obscure. In this study, we used positron emission tomography in 11 healthy volunteers to identify the brain areas in which hypnosis modulates cerebral responses to a noxious stimulus. METHODS: The protocol used a factorial design with two factors: state (hypnotic state, resting state, mental imagery) and stimulation (warm non-noxious vs. hot noxious stimuli applied to right thenar eminence). Two cerebral blood flow scans were obtained with the 15O-water technique during each condition. After each scan, the subject was asked to rate pain sensation and unpleasantness. Statistical parametric mapping was used to determine the main effects of noxious stimulation and hypnotic state as well as state-by-stimulation interactions (i.e., brain areas that would be more or less activated in hypnosis than in control conditions, under noxious stimulation). RESULTS: Hypnosis decreased both pain sensation and the unpleasantness of noxious stimuli. Noxious stimulation caused an increase in regional cerebral blood flow in the thalamic nuclei and anterior cingulate and insular cortices. The hypnotic state induced a significant activation of a right-sided extrastriate area and the anterior cingulate cortex. The interaction analysis showed that the activity in the anterior (mid-)cingulate cortex was related to pain perception and unpleasantness differently in the hypnotic state than in control situations. CONCLUSIONS: Both intensity and unpleasantness of the noxious stimuli are reduced during the hypnotic state. In addition, hypnotic modulation of pain is mediated by the anterior cingulate cortex. Publication Types: Clinical trial PMID: 10781270 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Then you have already seen the Pet Scans for IBS. Just for the sake of it take a look at the centers all these abstrat and studies are looking at. I am not the expert on the brain for sure, but some of these areas are matching up and I am sure I am not the only one who has noticed this.
However, these are just some of my areas of interest and only reflect my own interest, other then I know they are doing some more Pet Images with all this.Then there is certainly a lot of information on the benefits of Hypnosis for a lot of conditions.Tom, you read this right?The Effects of Hypnosis OnGastrointestinal Problems http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/hypnosis.htm ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yeah, i think you're right. the basic problem i'm trying ot come up with a way of explaining to people and doctors that there is a lot of research and there are 'proven' ways of helping people.most doctors and laypeople get 'scared' and close down when you mention psycholgy or hypnosis. the media doesn't seem to have done much to educate people here. 6there are some parallels between treatment for depression and ibs when a new patient comes in and even after all of the research and information in the last fifty years or so i find myslef spending the first hour trying to allay suspicions. it's not really a question any longer fo what researcher is better or which treatment is better but communication the information to other professionals and the general public.maybe a faq for the forum would be worthwhile, eric, but i think it would be more helpful if it were written by a layperson?tom
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
eric, interesting articles, even if only to me and a few others. i think mike is right. people need an explanation they can understand and we're talking about areas that experts will admit (if pressed) they are only beginning to tap. i think there will be a lot of research appearing in the next few years on all these issues. I know ucla is doing work in this area and i would guess mayo is as well. one thing to keep in mind when you look through research on the brain is that there are two major schools of thought when it comes to neuropsych: the localizers and the functionalists. Locations in the brain are not always the final answer on how the brain works.tom
 

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Tom, I agree with you completely.I think it is very cool they have this new technique(PET) to investigate how the mind works. There was a really good show on PBS on the body,I think it was called Beyond Human. I highly reecommend it if you see it on, it was amazing what they are working on.I also agree there is a ton to learn.This is good. from medscape on pain http://www.medscape.com/medscape/cno/2000/...m?story_id=1820 ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 
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