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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering if this was possible. I often feel as though I am on the verge of expelling gas, but before I can, this "bubble" feels like it is going back into the colon. The feeling is most definitely gas. I can feel actual "air bubbles."Anyway, I was just wondering how this is possible. I didn't think the colon could actually push things back up.
 

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The colon is supposed to operate with smooth, slow peristaltic waves (i.e., waves of muscular contraction that move very slowly along the length of the colon). When it's working properly, food material and gas won't normally go backwards.However, with IBS the enteric nervous system that controls the peristaltic waves malfunctions. IMHO, it malfunctions either as a result of improper immune system reaction to allergens, or it malfunctions because of damage to, or incorrect action of, the brain/gut nervous system itself.You can have spasmed areas in the colon that won't let anything pass, or you can have peristalsis running at too fast a pace, or you can have uncoordinated peristalsis. So yes, IMHO, you could conceivably have some gas move backwards, particularly in the descending colon.
 

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The colon is supposed to operate with smooth, slow peristaltic waves (i.e., waves of muscular contraction that move very slowly along the length of the colon). When it's working properly, food material and gas won't normally go backwards.However, with IBS the enteric nervous system that controls the peristaltic waves malfunctions. IMHO, it malfunctions either as a result of improper immune system reaction to allergens, or it malfunctions because of damage to, or incorrect action of, the brain/gut nervous system itself.You can have spasmed areas in the colon that won't let anything pass, or you can have peristalsis running at too fast a pace, or you can have uncoordinated peristalsis. So yes, IMHO, you could conceivably have some gas move backwards, particularly in the descending colon.
 

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The intestine performs two basic motions:segmentationperistalsisIn the first, digesta is moved back and forth within a segment of intestine. This is to help aid in digestion and absorption.In the second, digesta is moved from one area of the intestine to another. Usually, the general direction is aboral, meaning away from the mouth, but it is also possible to move in reverse (this is vomiting).Now to answer your question specifically, we really don't know how gas moves in the gut, especially how it moves in the colon. Only recently, a group of Spanish researchers have started exploring this in depth in humans. And at this point, they have not looked at actual gas motion with respect to either segmentation and peristalsis. It would be difficult to do in humans since one would have to put in some marker gas. This coud be done in animals, but I don't know that it has been done.
quote:The colon is supposed to operate with smooth, slow peristaltic waves (i.e., waves of muscular contraction that move very slowly along the length of the colon). When it's working properly, food material and gas won't normally go backwards.
Actually, the colon performs segmentation and there are haustral contractions. So it's not all forward motion.
quote:However, with IBS the enteric nervous system that controls the peristaltic waves malfunctions.
I don't believe that anyone has ever found "abnormal" peristalsis in an IBS subject. One major finding in a few IBS subjects is they have more frequent high amplitude peristalic contractions (this is a form of power propulsion, which is actually fairly quick). The contractions are normal, they just occur a bit more frequently and that could explain how diarrhea occurs in those persons. ------------------I am not a doctor, nor do I work for profit in the medical/pharmacological field, but I have read scientific and medical texts, and have access to numerous sources of medical information that are not readily available to others. One should always consult a medical professional regarding advice received.[This message has been edited by flux (edited 10-16-2001).]
 

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The intestine performs two basic motions:segmentationperistalsisIn the first, digesta is moved back and forth within a segment of intestine. This is to help aid in digestion and absorption.In the second, digesta is moved from one area of the intestine to another. Usually, the general direction is aboral, meaning away from the mouth, but it is also possible to move in reverse (this is vomiting).Now to answer your question specifically, we really don't know how gas moves in the gut, especially how it moves in the colon. Only recently, a group of Spanish researchers have started exploring this in depth in humans. And at this point, they have not looked at actual gas motion with respect to either segmentation and peristalsis. It would be difficult to do in humans since one would have to put in some marker gas. This coud be done in animals, but I don't know that it has been done.
quote:The colon is supposed to operate with smooth, slow peristaltic waves (i.e., waves of muscular contraction that move very slowly along the length of the colon). When it's working properly, food material and gas won't normally go backwards.
Actually, the colon performs segmentation and there are haustral contractions. So it's not all forward motion.
quote:However, with IBS the enteric nervous system that controls the peristaltic waves malfunctions.
I don't believe that anyone has ever found "abnormal" peristalsis in an IBS subject. One major finding in a few IBS subjects is they have more frequent high amplitude peristalic contractions (this is a form of power propulsion, which is actually fairly quick). The contractions are normal, they just occur a bit more frequently and that could explain how diarrhea occurs in those persons. ------------------I am not a doctor, nor do I work for profit in the medical/pharmacological field, but I have read scientific and medical texts, and have access to numerous sources of medical information that are not readily available to others. One should always consult a medical professional regarding advice received.[This message has been edited by flux (edited 10-16-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses. Obviously, it hasn't been thoroughly researched. I can see how such research would be difficult! Anyway, it feels like the same thing that happens when a person "holds it in" and loses the urge, only in my case, it's with gas, and the "urge" or need to expel goes away in just a few seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the responses. Obviously, it hasn't been thoroughly researched. I can see how such research would be difficult! Anyway, it feels like the same thing that happens when a person "holds it in" and loses the urge, only in my case, it's with gas, and the "urge" or need to expel goes away in just a few seconds.
 
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