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There is a lot to all this Olga, but the brain and the gut brain are both operative in IBS to cause the symptoms. IBS is a dyregualtion of neurotransmitter chemicals between the gut brain and the brain. Serotonin is an important chemical in this system that controls the Peristaltic Reflex.Actaully there is so much to this it would take a bit of time to explain it all and how valuable these treatments are. However these two treatments are on the top of the charts for IBS statistically. They have also been shown to keep woring after the treatment. They also have no side effects really. Actaully benefical side effects for the most part. Also I have found is hard for most people to make these connections with out studying all this and the effects of neurotransmitters and how they work, how the body works and how IBS effects it.Your thoughts can influence you symptoms greatly.I am going to post a lot of info here on some of this for you.First here is a picture of the brain in IBSers. We differ from brain scans of normal people and differ from et scans in Inflammatory bowel disease."Neuroimaging has provided evidence of physiological differences between normal individuals and those suffering from IBS in the way a visceral stimulus (ie, rectal distention) is processed in the brain.[14,15] Initial data from positron emission tomography (PET) scans demonstrated increased activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) among normal individuals, comparedto IBS patients. The ACC is a cerebral cortical area that is rich in opiate receptors and is thought to be a major component of cognitive circuits relating to perception as well as descending spinal pathways involving pain. More recently, fMRI was used to demonstrate increased activity in the ACC, prefrontal (PF), and insular cortex areas, and in the thalamus of IBS patients compared to normal individuals."
This is information on how closely they are connected. http://www.ahealthyme.com/topic/mindbodygu...AETVTWCYSYZSFEQ This is some information on why relaxation helps.Using Relaxation Coping with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/relax.htm CBT information for IBS http://search.about.com/fullsearch.htm?Top...cbt%20and%20IBS The Effects of Hypnosis On Gastrointestinal Problems http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/hypnosis.htm Hypnotherapy significantly improves symptoms in IBS patients http://www.gastrohep.com/news/news.asp?id=1158 I start with that as its a lot to digest at once.
 

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There is a lot to all this Olga, but the brain and the gut brain are both operative in IBS to cause the symptoms. IBS is a dyregualtion of neurotransmitter chemicals between the gut brain and the brain. Serotonin is an important chemical in this system that controls the Peristaltic Reflex.Actaully there is so much to this it would take a bit of time to explain it all and how valuable these treatments are. However these two treatments are on the top of the charts for IBS statistically. They have also been shown to keep woring after the treatment. They also have no side effects really. Actaully benefical side effects for the most part. Also I have found is hard for most people to make these connections with out studying all this and the effects of neurotransmitters and how they work, how the body works and how IBS effects it.Your thoughts can influence you symptoms greatly.I am going to post a lot of info here on some of this for you.First here is a picture of the brain in IBSers. We differ from brain scans of normal people and differ from et scans in Inflammatory bowel disease."Neuroimaging has provided evidence of physiological differences between normal individuals and those suffering from IBS in the way a visceral stimulus (ie, rectal distention) is processed in the brain.[14,15] Initial data from positron emission tomography (PET) scans demonstrated increased activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) among normal individuals, comparedto IBS patients. The ACC is a cerebral cortical area that is rich in opiate receptors and is thought to be a major component of cognitive circuits relating to perception as well as descending spinal pathways involving pain. More recently, fMRI was used to demonstrate increased activity in the ACC, prefrontal (PF), and insular cortex areas, and in the thalamus of IBS patients compared to normal individuals."
This is information on how closely they are connected. http://www.ahealthyme.com/topic/mindbodygu...AETVTWCYSYZSFEQ This is some information on why relaxation helps.Using Relaxation Coping with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/relax.htm CBT information for IBS http://search.about.com/fullsearch.htm?Top...cbt%20and%20IBS The Effects of Hypnosis On Gastrointestinal Problems http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/hypnosis.htm Hypnotherapy significantly improves symptoms in IBS patients http://www.gastrohep.com/news/news.asp?id=1158 I start with that as its a lot to digest at once.
 

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This was one of the brain imaging studies.ClinicalCentral fear circuits less activated in IBS patientsSAN DIEGO, CA, May 22 (Reuters Health) - The threat of visceral discomfort appears to evokean emotional rather than fearful response in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS),researchers report at the annual Digestive Disease Week meetings held here.Dr. Bruce D. Naliboff, of UCLA Medical Center, in Los Angeles, with colleagues there and atUC Irvine Medical Center, performed a PET study of 12 IBS patients and 12 controls to examinethe brain response associated with the fear of anticipated visceral discomfort.Brain scans were obtained on all subjects at baseline, during moderate rectal distension andduring expected but undelivered noxious distension. "Although we know that IBS is exacerbatedby stress, we conducted this study to learn more about the connection between the disease andbrain function," Dr. Naliboff said in an interview with Reuters Health.Brain scans showed that controls had "greater baseline activity in mid anterior cingulate cortex(ACC), and greater activation in the perigenual mid ACC, lateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus,periaqueductal grey and medullary regions" than did IBS patients.During visceral stimulation, "IBS patients showed greater activation in mid anterior cingulatecortex as well as posterior cingulate," compared with controls, the researchers note.They found that expected but undelivered rectal discomfort activated the central fear circuits inthe controls. IBS patients showed "less activation of the fear circuits but greater activity inposterior cingulate cortex.""Our findings indicate that the parts of the brain that respond in IBS patients are the same parts ofthe brain involved in processing emotionally charged information," Dr. Naliboff said. "Thesedata give us a better understanding of this stress-related disorder and may provide informationabout potential new medication targets," he explained."This brain imaging study is one of a series examining IBS, dyspepsia and fibromyalgia," Dr.Naliboff added.-Westport Newsroom 203 319 2700
 

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This was one of the brain imaging studies.ClinicalCentral fear circuits less activated in IBS patientsSAN DIEGO, CA, May 22 (Reuters Health) - The threat of visceral discomfort appears to evokean emotional rather than fearful response in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS),researchers report at the annual Digestive Disease Week meetings held here.Dr. Bruce D. Naliboff, of UCLA Medical Center, in Los Angeles, with colleagues there and atUC Irvine Medical Center, performed a PET study of 12 IBS patients and 12 controls to examinethe brain response associated with the fear of anticipated visceral discomfort.Brain scans were obtained on all subjects at baseline, during moderate rectal distension andduring expected but undelivered noxious distension. "Although we know that IBS is exacerbatedby stress, we conducted this study to learn more about the connection between the disease andbrain function," Dr. Naliboff said in an interview with Reuters Health.Brain scans showed that controls had "greater baseline activity in mid anterior cingulate cortex(ACC), and greater activation in the perigenual mid ACC, lateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus,periaqueductal grey and medullary regions" than did IBS patients.During visceral stimulation, "IBS patients showed greater activation in mid anterior cingulatecortex as well as posterior cingulate," compared with controls, the researchers note.They found that expected but undelivered rectal discomfort activated the central fear circuits inthe controls. IBS patients showed "less activation of the fear circuits but greater activity inposterior cingulate cortex.""Our findings indicate that the parts of the brain that respond in IBS patients are the same parts ofthe brain involved in processing emotionally charged information," Dr. Naliboff said. "Thesedata give us a better understanding of this stress-related disorder and may provide informationabout potential new medication targets," he explained."This brain imaging study is one of a series examining IBS, dyspepsia and fibromyalgia," Dr.Naliboff added.-Westport Newsroom 203 319 2700
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow! Thanks for all the info Eric! I'm going to have to read up on all this before I have any more questions. Thank you so much for responding and I WILL check out your website.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow! Thanks for all the info Eric! I'm going to have to read up on all this before I have any more questions. Thank you so much for responding and I WILL check out your website.
 
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