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http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0977435601/ref=oss_productI read this book and found it extremely insightful. I have started following his diet protocol which goes completely against the standard treatment by the medical community, and it is helping.In his study, Dr. Pimentel has found that the majority of his test subjects presented with symptoms of IBS had overgrowth of colon bacteria into the small intestine. Upon treatment with two types of antibiotics which are not absorbed to the general body and mostly stay in the G.I. tract successfully relieved or partially relieved IBS symptoms. In his book he states that the standard practice for IBS treatment is counterproductive. Two examples for his conclusion include:Examples of standard practice versus Dr. Pimentel's protocol. * 6 small meals per day versus 3 meals, with periods of complete empty stomach = only when the stomach is free of food, the small intestine kick-starts peristalsis (natural cleansing wave action of the small intestine which pushes residual food and bacteria into the large intestine.) With 6 meals per day, the peristalsis is limited or blocked as the stomach never has a chance to completely empty.* Including fiber supplements with meals or fiber foods vs lower fiber in meals - fiber is a yummy food for bacteria. Since it is non-digestible, it travels unabsorbed throughout the intestinal tract, thus allowing the bacteria to have a full supply of food to ferment.Dr. Pimentel also adds that depending on the type of gas emissions from bacteria his test subjects experienced diarrhea and/or constipation. Via a breath test, which he explains in the book, he found that patients who expelled methane gas where IBS patients with symptoms of diarrhea, and test subjects that expelled hydrogen gas where IBS patients with constipation.There is a lot to be said about his study. Just like he points out in his book, 10 or 15 years ago ulcers were considered stress induced and psychosomatic in nature and patients were treated with anxiety meds and the like, now it is common practice to treat ulcers with antibiotics as it was slowly accepted that ulcers are caused by the H-pylori bacteria. With IBS there is the same type of resistance by the medical community to look at IBS on a clean slate and contemplate the high probability that IBS is largely due to overgrowth of bacteria that has traveled into the small intestine (where is not supposed to be in the first place or only at very low levels).I hope this helps people out there. I am definitely going to take this book to my yet again, "next GI appointment," and request the tests that are recommended in this book.Good luck!
 

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http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0977435601/ref=oss_productI read this book and found it extremely insightful. I have started following his diet protocol which goes completely against the standard treatment by the medical community, and it is helping.In his study, Dr. Pimentel has found that the majority of his test subjects presented with symptoms of IBS had overgrowth of colon bacteria into the small intestine. Upon treatment with two types of antibiotics which are not absorbed to the general body and mostly stay in the G.I. tract successfully relieved or partially relieved IBS symptoms. In his book he states that the standard practice for IBS treatment is counterproductive. Two examples for his conclusion include:Examples of standard practice versus Dr. Pimentel's protocol. * 6 small meals per day versus 3 meals, with periods of complete empty stomach = only when the stomach is free of food, the small intestine kick-starts peristalsis (natural cleansing wave action of the small intestine which pushes residual food and bacteria into the large intestine.) With 6 meals per day, the peristalsis is limited or blocked as the stomach never has a chance to completely empty.Thanks for posting this as no doubt it will be food for thought for a lot of people.Having said that this book has been discussed many times on this forum although of course there is no reason it shouldn't be discussed again.Unfortunately a lot of people with IBS do not have a bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine but I agree that it is worth getting checked out.In addition, Pimentel has just concluded phase III trials with the antibiotic rifaxamin for the treatment of IBS with good results and it seems very likely that the FDA will approve for use for IBS.* Including fiber supplements with meals or fiber foods vs lower fiber in meals - fiber is a yummy food for bacteria. Since it is non-digestible, it travels unabsorbed throughout the intestinal tract, thus allowing the bacteria to have a full supply of food to ferment.Dr. Pimentel also adds that depending on the type of gas emissions from bacteria his test subjects experienced diarrhea and/or constipation. Via a breath test, which he explains in the book, he found that patients who expelled methane gas where IBS patients with symptoms of diarrhea, and test subjects that expelled hydrogen gas where IBS patients with constipation.There is a lot to be said about his study. Just like he points out in his book, 10 or 15 years ago ulcers were considered stress induced and psychosomatic in nature and patients were treated with anxiety meds and the like, now it is common practice to treat ulcers with antibiotics as it was slowly accepted that ulcers are caused by the H-pylori bacteria. With IBS there is the same type of resistance by the medical community to look at IBS on a clean slate and contemplate the high probability that IBS is largely due to overgrowth of bacteria that has traveled into the small intestine (where is not supposed to be in the first place or only at very low levels).I hope this helps people out there. I am definitely going to take this book to my yet again, "next GI appointment," and request the tests that are recommended in this book.Good luck!
 
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