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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, the mystery has been solved:My IBS / gastritis / gallbladder / whatever problem, which lasted for about a year, and which was labeled IBS by doctors, was simply due to an office chair!!!The office chair, which has a hump in the seat which fits between the legs, and which is contoured along the side walls of the seat, apparently caused abominal muscles to become tense, and for the body's weight to put significant strain on key bodily organs in the abdominal region.But it was so subtle, that it was not acutely detectable -- you just sat in the chair and it felt okay, while it slowly caused chronic problems which are commonly associated with IBS and/or gastritis, dyspepsia, gallbladder problems, as well as cardiac arrhythmias, anxiety without fear, etc.If you work in an office and sit in a chair for more than 5 hours a day, I urge you to try different chairs and/or postures in order to rule them out as the cause of your digestive problems and/or abdominal pain. A physiologist I talked to, said he's heard of others having similar GI problems due to the chairs they sit in, but that it's rare.I ate out for the first time in months this week, without any dyspepsia or other digestive problems, this only 2 weeks after changing chairs (now that I think about it, my symptoms did begin with the new chair I got last year, and they started suddenly).I look forward to eating normally again, and of gaining some weight back. With the ability to eat normally again, I have more energy, which means more ability to exercise, which stimulates hormones, which improves digestion, ad infinitum. I am slowly rebuilding my body's tolerance to certain foods, which have been out of my diet for 9+ months.Believe in yourself, no matter what others say -- don't believe that you are crazy, or that it's in your head, that it's caused by "stress", or that your symptoms are necessarily "caused" by a thing called IBS. IBS is a description of GI symptoms and/or responses to GI stimulii, not a disease. Therefore telling someone with GI complaints that they have IBS, is like telling someone with an insect bite that they have itch. It's almost meaningless.
"The belief that doctors are their patients' agents--serving their patients' interests and needs above all others--seems to me to be of a piece with mankind's basic religious and familial myths."​
-- Thomas Szasz, The Theology of Medicine[This message has been edited by ldk (edited 06-18-2000).]
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
This is fascinating. I have horrable posture and sit with that posture at least five hours a day. Though it sounds like the chances that this is the cause of my ibs are slim, I'd be interested in seeing what happens if I change my posture. Thanks for the info. and good luck.Brian
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Interesting indeed, me thinks that link lead to a commerical........
------------------ Don't make ME come down there!!. GOD
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, Joyce, the link doesn't lead to a commercial :)It just goes to the page of someone who has fought all his life against medicine when it doesn't align with the individualized interests and choices of the patient. His views ring especially true in this era of managed care, where the interests of the HMO/insurance company or doctor get put ahead of the patient, and the patient isn't even allowed to make choices.People with the set of symptoms labeled "IBS" are especially at risk of receiving poor care, because there are so many things which can cause the symptoms labeled IBS. It's far easier to lump them together into a single category called IBS (a "wastebasket diagnosis"), and stick our heads in the sand (and only treat the current set of symptoms).I am of the opinion that Rome was a response to managed care, where diagnosis and justification for insurance claims is more important than pain relief or patient satisfaction. It's what led IBS to becoming formalized (more than it was before). But its scientific status is still questionable. Oh, the symptoms are real -- no doubt about it. But does everyone with IBS have the same "disease"? Almost certainly not.The chair posture change definitely helps. I've felt much better for almost 3 weeks. I spend nearly 10 hours a day in a chair (at a computer). But methinks there's still something wrong with my body (perhaps in the endocrine system).Changing the chair posture has removed most of the gastritis and indigestion, and has allowed small amounts of fat to be consumed without severe reactions, but there's still a vague feeling that something's not right, such as heart palpitations, poor circulation sometimes leading to tremors or tingling in the skin, low exercise tolerance, fatigue, light-headedness, and a complete intolerance to caffeine that I never had before this illness (I'm 30, and one can of Coke causes sweating, rapid heartbeat, palpitations, restlessness, pain in the arms and legs, anxiety, and insomnia which lasts over 24 hours).Sounds almost like hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, or pheochromocytoma, but until I gather the courage to see a 4th doctor and risk disappointment again, I won't know :-(I'm almost ready to try again. This next time, I'll go to an endocrinologist or an internist, rather than a gastroenterologist. The first symptoms were GI symptoms mimicking IBS, but those have been eliminated now. The GI symptoms are now secondary in importance.
 
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