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NB: It's now April and I've edited this post by deleting the glucose lollies that I thought were OK but weren't and also the other fruit and yoghurt.

This is my basic default diet which I've been eating for almost a month:

Breakfast:
2 eggs, 2 shortcut bacon & fried tomato. A pot of black tea.

Lunch:
Seafood and salami with salad vegetables: cucumber, carrot, tomato, gherkin, 8 - 10 green olives, beetroot. One ripe banana.

Dinner:
meat or seafood with cooked carrot, green beans, pumpkin.

Fruit:
Just one banana a day

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The most important aspects to this diet is that it is very low in starch as well as high FODMAPs but also very high in foods that bacteria don't eat much of - meat and insoluble fibre. Starch is a problem for those with SIBO, as bacteria in the small intestine can ferment starch, causing gas. High FODMAPs can also cause gas, either in the small or large intestine, depending on what type of carbohydrate they are.

This diet has elements of both low FODMAP and the Specific Carbohydrate Diets. The theories behind the 2 diets differ greatly. FODMAP intolerance seems to centre on fermentation in the colon and therefore allows starch which is digested in the small intestine, whereas the SPECIFIC CARBOHYDRATE diet seems aimed more at SIBO, fermentation in the small intestine, and so disallows starch. Anyone with IBS could have both: an overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine as well as pathogenic bacteria in the colon. It makes sense to combine the 2 diets and Alison Siebecker was the first person to do this as far as I know.

IBS and SIBO is basically carbohydrate malabsorption.

A lot of people here will have trouble with the salads. These should be introduced very gradually. There is a lot of misinformation about insoluble fibre and how bad this is for IBS. The fact is, any inflammatory or irritating food is bad for IBS. If you experience cramping or gas from any food, you should stop eating it immediately. All insoluble fibre, especially raw vegetables, should be introduced very slowly and in tiny portions so as not to cause gastrointestinal distress. Small portions introduced very gradually should also gradually increase the enzymes and bacteria needed to digest them.

The stomach is naturally very acidic and low pH. This is important for good digestion. Pathogenic bacteria like H.Pylori can increase the stomach's pH, making the stomach more alkaline and less acidic to make a more hospitable environment for itself. A raising of pH makes digesting carbohydrates more difficult. Commensal or good bacteria completes with pathogens and helps to lower stomach pH by the production of short chain fatty acids which also help to reduce inflammation.

Raw salad vegetables contain their own enzymes and are themselves non-inflammatory. If a bacterial imbalance is causing an enzyme or stomach acid deficiency salad vegetables are an ideal food as they are very easy to digest. If you're not used to salads, these can have an osmotic or diarrheal effect and so can become inflammatory if your system can't digest them . Salads are partly digested in the colon by particular bacteria called bacteroides and so gradually adding salads to your diet will also gradually increase the bacteria that feeds on them.

What I've found so far:

The mushiness, degree of breakage of stool, paleness, gas and difficulty in evacuating is related to starch and certain high FODMAPs. If I eat potato, wheat or any food high in starch or any irritating food like pulses, nuts etc I have a difficult and prolonged evacuation the next day, usually with a lot of gas. Irritating foods have an osmotic effect and can rush through the colon, largely undigested. This can either cause diarrhea or fermentation (gas) depending on your IBS type (IBS-D or IBS-C).

A more solid, dark brown and fuller stool which is quicker to completely evacuate is the result of very low starch, low FODMAPs - and the increase of insoluble fibre which is easily digested. It's the insoluble fibre that bulks up stool.

The controversy about resistant starch: A lot of websites claim that resistant starch is beneficial to the gut because it creates short chain fatty acids that are good for colon health. This is true for people who don't have IBS / SIBO. I've found that I need to severely curtail all starches. I don't know how long I have to do this for. The specific carbohydrate diet is designed to be permanent. The low FODMAP diet is intended to be temporary only, until your IBS symptoms are under control. Certain high FODMAPs are believed to be more beneficial than others and should in time be gradually introduced: galacto-oligosaccharides (e.g. Lentils) are beneficial to the colon if you tolerate them, whereas excess fructose is basically a toxin and fructans from wheat should never be re-introduced.

Leaky Gas is a form of constipation caused by the gasses from carbohydrate malabsorption. The only food that directly helps constipation is insoluble fibre. This is why it is so important to gradually introduce insoluble fibre into your diet.
 

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I think you are in the spot with this one. I will have to ask some questions.

Do you have the 2 types of gas ( controllable/uncontrolable)?

This diet eliminated completly the odor of flatulance?

The origin of your gas leakage was stress or just bad nutrition and eating?

Any supplement, pills or remedies you are taking other than dieting ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello, no I never take meds or supplements. I used to have really bad Leaky Gas that leaked out all day at work. That's when I used to eat wheat & other grains, legumes, nuts, hamburgers, pizzas and a lot of sugar. Evacuation literally took hours. I've been on the FODMAP diet since 2013 but not strictly; I was still eating sandwiches for lunch and the gas would gradually return in the afternoon. If you can tolerate all these vegetables try this diet. There's no restriction on how much you actually eat so if you do get more hungry just eat more veges. Fats are important. If you can, put butter on your cooked vegetables and loads of butter or olive oil in the pan when pan frying meat or fish.

I've edited my opening post just now. I took out the glucose / dextrose lollies as they were causing gas as well as the other fruits and yoghurt, so it is a very strict low FODMAP, low starch, low fructose, and acceptable for Candida and Autoimmune. This isn't meant to be a permanent diet - it's just to try for 2 or 3 days to see if this stops most of your IBS symptoms. If it works, then each day gradually try to introduce a non-toxic high FODMAP like broccoli or cabbage (but never wheat, grains, legumes, nuts, and sugar of any kind). I'm still not sure about yoghurts so it's probably best to just exclude these for a few days.

Today I had 2 gasses I think. It's now 7.00 pm and still no gas. The worst aspect was giving up the sugar but it is a tough diet overall.

The cause of my Leaky Gas was a predisposition to slow transit constipation which I guess is genetic. I was also an alcohol for many years and that probably led to some form of Leaky Gut. I wasn't properly digesting the junk food I used to eat and this caused a lot of gas which was impossible to hold in as it was too painful. so in that sense it was uncontrollable. This curing diet is very low flatulogenic as long as you can tolerate the fibre OK. If not, substitute cooked veges for the salads.
 
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