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Count me in, too. I have GERD and IBS. Stands to reason--if the digestive system isn't working so well, acid production could be messed up to.I take Nexium for the GERD. If I miss a day, that Heartburn comes right back.
 

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Here is my uneducated guess as to why they might be related. If your colon is totally disfunctional and not emptying properly, then it seems that everything "upstream" will be affected by it. If the river gets damned it forms a lake. So the lake is backing up into your sm. bowel, which in turn is backing up into your stomach, which in turn is backing up into your esophagus and causing pain, reflux of stomach acid. Maybe the "backing up" is what causes the bloating. Just a guess.
 

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FYISource: University Of Michigan Health System Date: 2001-05-23 Study Offers Hope For Chocolate-Loving Reflux Disease SufferersAtlanta - For the 14 million Americans who suffer with chronic heartburn, a piece of chocolate may start as a joy to the tongue, but can end with a raging fire in the stomach. But there may be new hope for those suffering chocolate-lovers. Results from a new study at the University of Michigan Health System, presented today at the Digestive Diseases Week meeting in Atlanta, not only reveal the mechanism by which chocolate irritates the digestive tract of those who suffer with chronic heartburn - also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD - but also suggests a novel treatment. "We demonstrated that chocolate induces GERD symptoms by compromising the ability of the lower esophageal sphincter to prevent the stomach acids from creeping back up the esophagus," says Chung Owyang, chief of the U-M Division of Gastroenterology and professor of internal medicine in the U-M Medical School. "We also found that a medication commonly used for nausea may ease these painful symptoms," adds Owyang, the study's principal investigator. In the study, seven GERD patients underwent a series of tests. A tube containing a pH monitor was placed in the esophagus to measure acidity. A second tube was inserted into the first part of the small intestine, the duodenum, to deliver chocolate directly to the gut. After the chocolate infusion, researchers measured the acidity in the esophagus and how long it took the acidity to rebound to normal levels. Researchers also determined the pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter, located at the junction between the stomach and the esophagus. In a person who does not suffer from GERD, the sphincter acts as a valve and allows substances to go from the esophagus down to the stomach only. In GERD sufferers, the sphincter does not function properly, allowing acid and other substances in the stomach to pass back up to the esophagus. The researchers found that chocolate significantly increased the number of reflux events and the acid exposure time in the esophagus for the seven patients. "We found that the chocolate causes a large amount of serotonin to be released from the cells in the intestines," says Wei Ming Sun, Ph.D., research scientist, U-M Department of Internal Medicine. "The serotonin causes the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The relaxation means the 'door' between the esophagus and stomach is opened and acid is allowed to flow back up to the esophagus." After documenting the effects, patients were given granisetron - a substance commonly used to counteract nausea. Granisetron was shown in earlier U-M studies to reduce the effects of chocolate on patients who did not have GERD. "When the patients with GERD took the granisetron, which is a serotonin blocker, there was a significant decrease in the numbers of reflux events, the acid exposure time and the acid clearance time," Owyang says. Specifically, the chocolate caused an average of 5.4 reflux events in a 30-minute time period. After treatment with granisetron, the events were down to 3.3 in 30 minutes. Acid exposure time decreased by more than a third after granisetron, and acid clearance time decreased from an average of 8.3 minutes just after the chocolate infusion, to 5.9 minutes with granisetron. This novel approach may provide alternative effective methods for the treatment of GERD without inhibiting normal acid secretion, which is important to digestion and control of bacterial growth. Next, the researchers plan to conduct a double blind, multi-center trial to confirm this observation. Other researchers on the project were: Sutep Gonlachanvit, M.D., research fellow, U-M Department of Internal Medicine; Yen H. Chen, M.D., research fellow, U-M Department of Internal Medicine; Han-Chung Lien, M.D., research fellow, U-M Department of Internal Medicine. This story has been adapted from a news release issued by University Of Michigan Health System.
 

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Eric- That is very interesting about chocolate, in light of my experience. Prior to 1998 I suffered from morning to night indigestion with ocassional reflux. At that time I began on my flavonoid supplement. No more reflux. No more indigestion. (In December of 2001 I stopped it for amonth. Within a week the indigestion returned; hence the "condition" is still with me.) I currently have two major hits of chocolate every day. One as my lunch time meal replacement and one at the end of the day with a fat burning chocolate bar that I eat prior to my workout. No indigestion from either of these sources.It is clear that the flavonoids are doing something to control my digestive problems. (Not to mention my diarrhea.) The question is what, who would want to know, and how do you get this information in front of researchers. (E-mailing does not work!)Since this would appear to be both an effective and novel treatment--I don't imagine a couple of caps of fruit extracts taken in the morning are going to "mop up" all of the acid I might produce--I feel it important enough to keep pushing the information forward; but I have no idea of how to do that. Any guidance you could provide would be very helpful.Mark
 

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Mark, I don't know how you would go about that, sorry wish I could help."It is clear that the flavonoids are doing something to control my digestive problems"I do know the first thing would be to do your own research into how it was possible and the connections to start.
 

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Since I too have IBS and acid I asked my doctor, who had already told me that IBS is stress related, and she also mentioned that stress can cause the stomach to produce more acid. So stress may be how the two are related--at least that seems to the be case for me.Carly
 
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