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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to this and ran across this forum. It's been a blessing to read others having similar issues so I don't feel so isolated.I basically have the immediate urge to BM caused by loss-of-control environmental situations, mostly based on traveling. I'm good if driving, uncomfortable if stuck in traffic and unfamiliar with my surroundings for example. Taking a subway or riding with others for long periods of time are anxiety-causing issues, and I think it stems from my being a Type A personality. The problem is that I think about my travels, plans, schedules, etc., almost automatically, and I live through the embarrassment of having these immediate reactions that start with stress, waves of stress, onto the gas and, finally, "I gotta go NOW." I just don't want it to cause me to start retreating from opportunities, going out with friends, etc., because I'm afraid of being stuck somewhere without a bathroom close by.Can anyone identify and offer suggestions, perhaps? Thanks for reading.
 

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See my post below. I feel exactly the same way. If I am in a store where there is no obvious public restroom, I panic and my stomach instantly reacts. If I am in a car with someone else, I panic because if I were driving alone I could always plan what to do or where to go.I am afraid to go on road trips, and Heaven forbid I should be stuck in a traffic jam.It's been getting worse lately, and I just hate it. I am also extremely Type A, and worried about controling just about everything.
 

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I can so relate, and I agree that our type of personality plays a key role. I am 50 and have had these feelings and IBS since I was in my early 20's so although I am no expert, here are a few "coping" methods I have used over the years 1. Where possible, drive yourself. There are times that you will still have to go, but the panic is less if you are in control of pulling the car over to the side of the road.2. Tell people that you travel with that your Stomach is upset (even if it is not)and you might need to pull over. Sometimes just saying it helps the panic subside. Most people are sympathetic once they know your condition. 3. When you really have to travel with someone else at the wheel, take a "just in case" immodium about an hour before you leave and follow up with a second if you have a BM before leaving. 4. Subway rides: check out where the washrooms are at each stop and sit (or stand) close to the exit door.5. Same for car travel, try to know what highway exits have convienent rest stops. Knowing where they are means you will likely not need them !6. When stuck in traffic, try to make sure you get into the right most lane so if you have to go, you can pull over on the shoulder of the road. Always keep a box of kleenex in the car along with a couple of plastic bags. In a dire emergency, you can squat by the passengers side of the car. With the door open to sheild you it gives you the needed privacy. (Again knowing you can do this means you will likely not need to). I have had to do this once or twice, but lucky for me there were woods nearby for privacy.7.Airports and Airplanes have lots of bathrooms, but I always take immodium prior to getting there because I'd rather not have to line up to use them.8. Tell you freinds / partners / spouse / family that you have IBS and need their support and understanding. It is crucial that you not be embarrassed around those closest to you. 9. Final note : Force yourself to be a passenger, first on short trips then longer. (I just did an 8 hour trip with my best friend driving) I was ok, but still would have been more comfortable behind the wheel.Good Luck and trust that you are certainly not alone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies so far and for the listing of coping methods. A couple very good ideas--especially about letting people know so that they're sensitive to what I'm dealing with instead of being embarrassed by it.I, too, have found that "knowing is half the battle." I actually hardly EVER have to use the bathroom as long as I know where it is. Only when I'm stuck without one do I absolutely have to go. Preparation definitely is key, so I really appreciate knowing that others deal with these same issues regularly.
 
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