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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been IBS"D" with severe cramping for 11 years now, since I had my gallbladder out. I have been on many different meds. I am presently on Levbid,caltrate600,buspar. I have recently cut out all dairy products. Ever since I cut out dairy, I have been,what I call, In remission for 2 months now. All the testing, all the different meds, all the different doctors, and I can't believe it might have been dairy? I still take my meds though, I am afraid to stop. I have had some real stressers going on during this time too, even when I am on my menstral cycle I don't get flair ups. This is something for others like me to look into, hey it won't hurt. I also lost 8lbs in these 2 months, I haven't been able to lose weight in a long time. I'm not very heavy to begin with, but I wanted to lose about 10lbs. I hope maybe I can help someone else with this.
 

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Some people are lactose intolerant and for them cutting down on dairy (particularly milk...not all dairy products are lactose containing) can relieve much of the symptoms they have.Lactose intolerance is a funny thing as the part of the population that has symptoms from milk and the part of the population that actually tests lactose intolerant are not the same exact group.Some people are lactose intolerant and have NO symptoms and some people with no demonstrable lactose intolerance seem to have symptoms whenever they knowingly consume dairy (for some hidden lactose doesn't bother them...so it gets kinda murky as to what exactly is going on).K.
 

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Some people are lactose intolerant and for them cutting down on dairy (particularly milk...not all dairy products are lactose containing) can relieve much of the symptoms they have.Lactose intolerance is a funny thing as the part of the population that has symptoms from milk and the part of the population that actually tests lactose intolerant are not the same exact group.Some people are lactose intolerant and have NO symptoms and some people with no demonstrable lactose intolerance seem to have symptoms whenever they knowingly consume dairy (for some hidden lactose doesn't bother them...so it gets kinda murky as to what exactly is going on).K.
 

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I n addition to what kmottus said, only people with IBS who test positive in the lactose intolerance test have symptoms. People without IBS who test positive don't have symptoms. So is it the lactose intolerance or the IBS which is causing all this. I feel the best test is just to eliminate dairy and see how you do. Other than having a problem with lactose, you may have problems with other fractions of the milk
 

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I n addition to what kmottus said, only people with IBS who test positive in the lactose intolerance test have symptoms. People without IBS who test positive don't have symptoms. So is it the lactose intolerance or the IBS which is causing all this. I feel the best test is just to eliminate dairy and see how you do. Other than having a problem with lactose, you may have problems with other fractions of the milk
 

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Dear Loraine:I am lactose intolerant and I didn't need a medical test to tell me!! Too many accidents after milk products. However, other things set me off too. Fish for one. And stress will do it.I am still taking meds as they relieve the pain, whereas just caltrate 3x a day (which is wonderful) and watching my diet didn't help with the pain. I am so much better on meds. (Donnatal 2x per day)Good luck to you, michele-
 

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Dear Loraine:I am lactose intolerant and I didn't need a medical test to tell me!! Too many accidents after milk products. However, other things set me off too. Fish for one. And stress will do it.I am still taking meds as they relieve the pain, whereas just caltrate 3x a day (which is wonderful) and watching my diet didn't help with the pain. I am so much better on meds. (Donnatal 2x per day)Good luck to you, michele-
 

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Loraine...Think maybe just fat fat fat too. After gall bladder surgery like yours a lot of people have trouble emulsifying fat when it comes in a load (no reservoir available) and diarrhea can be a symptom. This is one of the first places dieticians would look when presented with you history.Perhaps it was a simple as the fat in the milk products simply could not be properly emulsified so cutting it out cuts out the source of the problem, as the rest of your diet probably does not introduce high episodic fat doses very often.Anyway, its like anything else, if it fells bad, don't do it...and you fixed it. Cool. would that everyone find such simple solution.Keep up the good work...MNL
 

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Loraine...Think maybe just fat fat fat too. After gall bladder surgery like yours a lot of people have trouble emulsifying fat when it comes in a load (no reservoir available) and diarrhea can be a symptom. This is one of the first places dieticians would look when presented with you history.Perhaps it was a simple as the fat in the milk products simply could not be properly emulsified so cutting it out cuts out the source of the problem, as the rest of your diet probably does not introduce high episodic fat doses very often.Anyway, its like anything else, if it fells bad, don't do it...and you fixed it. Cool. would that everyone find such simple solution.Keep up the good work...MNL
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
First I would like to thank everyone for their responses. Mike, your right, any doctor that I have gone to, after I told them I had my gallbladder out, the first thing they say to me is that the gallbladder is the filter for fatty foods, now you don't have one, so u need to cut out fat or cut down on the fat, and it probably will help with the IBS. I did cut down on the fat, but it seemed like no matter what I ate, I went to the bathroom immediately. Since I cut out my dairy, it has all stopped. How do they check for lactose intolerance? Is it a blood test? Again thanks all for the insight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
First I would like to thank everyone for their responses. Mike, your right, any doctor that I have gone to, after I told them I had my gallbladder out, the first thing they say to me is that the gallbladder is the filter for fatty foods, now you don't have one, so u need to cut out fat or cut down on the fat, and it probably will help with the IBS. I did cut down on the fat, but it seemed like no matter what I ate, I went to the bathroom immediately. Since I cut out my dairy, it has all stopped. How do they check for lactose intolerance? Is it a blood test? Again thanks all for the insight.
 

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Cow's milk is not intended by nature for human consumption. It's intended for baby cows. I think the first thing anyone with IBS should do is try avoiding dairy and see what happens. There are many things other than the lactose that can be reactive, like proteins, and the way the milk is processed can introduce reactive things also.
 

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Cow's milk is not intended by nature for human consumption. It's intended for baby cows. I think the first thing anyone with IBS should do is try avoiding dairy and see what happens. There are many things other than the lactose that can be reactive, like proteins, and the way the milk is processed can introduce reactive things also.
 

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HI LORAINE:"Since I cut out my dairy, it has all stopped"Yep, so it could b several things. It could have been the fat in the products, so you eliminated a source of episodic fat dosing, or it could be the lactose as KM suggested or it couild be some other form of reactivity to the milk fractions. Most persosn with lactose intolerance can tolerate modest doses of milk and milk products if they are given in "split doses" throughout the day, and not in excess of the range of 300-500 ml. per day.Now some people will say to stay off dairy until you are asymptomatic, like you are now, and begin consuming milk at a dose higher than 300-500 ml and see if the symptoms return. Thsi will confirm milk provocation, but not lactose intolerance.Anyway once you have provoked the symptoms, then start taking the Lactaid supplement as directed up to the maximum dose until the symptoms subside while continuing to drink the milk periodically throughout the day. In the perfect world then you would find the right suppleement dose and then know how much to take from then on.Others would say just start with a low dose of milk with a low dose of the lactaid right away, and keep working it up...as you increase the mulk dose increase the lactaid. If you get to a dose which begins to show symptoms then stop increasing the milk dose and increase the lactaid.If you afre truly lactose intolerant that woul work. if it does not, you are hypersensitive to one or more of the milk fractions. But you know the provoking dose so keep your ingestion below that dose on a 3 -day rotation (don't accumulate more than the 3-day provoking dose at any time..just cut back down and the symptoms would subside...you probably have a dose-dependent reaction).Anyway, that is two ways of approaching it. others may have their pet protocols but the idea is to find the threshold of provocation and then see if the lactaid stops the symptoms. bingo. if not you have to look elsewhere with the milk.Some people just start with the lactose-free milk ad check for tolerance by drinking it freely for 3 days...this would indicate if you have a reaction to the remaining fractions. Then start with lactose-reduced vs lactose free...and see what dose tolerance is. Etc. There are many ways to skin the cat...which suits you is the one for you.PLUS now this has just determined tolerance for the core product: whole milk. You must then check each idividual dairy product for tolerance, since processing alters their characteristics and potential for antigenicity (loss of tolerance). Check each one you want to eat froma symptom-free starting poinr and ona 3-day consumptions basis (yogurt, your fav cheeses, fav ice cream, etc).Dairy is one of the trickiest to sort out completely and accuratley if you are intolerant bu NOT lactiose intolerant and NOT truly allergic, since the array of products is so wide, as is their composition.Hope that helps a bit. You may get some other suggestions....choose which seesm to fit your style of life and eating habits.Eat well. Think well. be well.MNL
 

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HI LORAINE:"Since I cut out my dairy, it has all stopped"Yep, so it could b several things. It could have been the fat in the products, so you eliminated a source of episodic fat dosing, or it could be the lactose as KM suggested or it couild be some other form of reactivity to the milk fractions. Most persosn with lactose intolerance can tolerate modest doses of milk and milk products if they are given in "split doses" throughout the day, and not in excess of the range of 300-500 ml. per day.Now some people will say to stay off dairy until you are asymptomatic, like you are now, and begin consuming milk at a dose higher than 300-500 ml and see if the symptoms return. Thsi will confirm milk provocation, but not lactose intolerance.Anyway once you have provoked the symptoms, then start taking the Lactaid supplement as directed up to the maximum dose until the symptoms subside while continuing to drink the milk periodically throughout the day. In the perfect world then you would find the right suppleement dose and then know how much to take from then on.Others would say just start with a low dose of milk with a low dose of the lactaid right away, and keep working it up...as you increase the mulk dose increase the lactaid. If you get to a dose which begins to show symptoms then stop increasing the milk dose and increase the lactaid.If you afre truly lactose intolerant that woul work. if it does not, you are hypersensitive to one or more of the milk fractions. But you know the provoking dose so keep your ingestion below that dose on a 3 -day rotation (don't accumulate more than the 3-day provoking dose at any time..just cut back down and the symptoms would subside...you probably have a dose-dependent reaction).Anyway, that is two ways of approaching it. others may have their pet protocols but the idea is to find the threshold of provocation and then see if the lactaid stops the symptoms. bingo. if not you have to look elsewhere with the milk.Some people just start with the lactose-free milk ad check for tolerance by drinking it freely for 3 days...this would indicate if you have a reaction to the remaining fractions. Then start with lactose-reduced vs lactose free...and see what dose tolerance is. Etc. There are many ways to skin the cat...which suits you is the one for you.PLUS now this has just determined tolerance for the core product: whole milk. You must then check each idividual dairy product for tolerance, since processing alters their characteristics and potential for antigenicity (loss of tolerance). Check each one you want to eat froma symptom-free starting poinr and ona 3-day consumptions basis (yogurt, your fav cheeses, fav ice cream, etc).Dairy is one of the trickiest to sort out completely and accuratley if you are intolerant bu NOT lactiose intolerant and NOT truly allergic, since the array of products is so wide, as is their composition.Hope that helps a bit. You may get some other suggestions....choose which seesm to fit your style of life and eating habits.Eat well. Think well. be well.MNL
 

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To me the procedures in Mike's post seem like way to much trouble - I'm temping, about to start a part-time job, running 2 hobbies (this is one), and looking for a "permanent" job. I don't have time for these long food trials.To me it's easier to just avoid dairy. I put olive oil or nut butter on my toast, rice milk on my cereal and in recipes. Mental note to try rice cheese sometime.
 

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To me the procedures in Mike's post seem like way to much trouble - I'm temping, about to start a part-time job, running 2 hobbies (this is one), and looking for a "permanent" job. I don't have time for these long food trials.To me it's easier to just avoid dairy. I put olive oil or nut butter on my toast, rice milk on my cereal and in recipes. Mental note to try rice cheese sometime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well I had an ice cream sandwich last night, and this afternoon, my gut started rumbling, and I got very gassy. I have had regular milk in my coffee at my parents house, just a little shot, and I've been doing that for a month now, and it never bothered me. I don't eat to much cheese so I don't have to worry about that. Rice milk? hmm I might just try it to taste, never heard of it. Yogurt always bothered my stomach, even though I really do like it. Thanks for all the help.
 
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