Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that lactose intolerance can be inherited. I suffered from C all my life then at 25 got pregnant and immediately got D. My doctor said I was lactose intolerant and it would go away after having the baby. I didn't make the connection right away but now looking back during that pregnancy, many foods triggered D, so I know now it was IBS. My first child (now 5) had severe gas (not colic) but we kept her on milk formula (lack of knowledge on my part, no real help from family doc). She was always very regular with the odd day of D. Since starting school she's had C and she's been seen in hospital emergency for stomach pain where they did X-ray and said she was constipated and it is not an uncommon thing when kids start school and routines change although the intern first said she mostly likely had IBS since I have it. I'm having her tested on Feb. 21 for milk allergy. Now with my second child, girl, now 5 months, I'm having all the same problems I had with my first but now have more knowledge. At two-three weeks of age we put her on ALIMENTUM formula for allergies to milk and soy formulas. My doctor never tested her for allergy just said switch her. Because Alimentum is so outrageously expensive, over the past two weeks I started mixing the Alimentum with a milk formula and now it's just a milk formula, well, for two days she's been crying on and off, not sleeping, much more gas, and stool change. It's quite obvious that she's having difficulty with the milk formula. I want to have her tested as well. My doctor is the type of person who hates to put babies on any medication and tells me "there's nothing we can do" or there "is no medication for babies." Anyone have any suggestions/comments?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
My son reacted the same way to milk formula that your 5 month old is. We put him on soy formula and he did fine. He is now 8 and is lactose intolerant. Strangely enough, between the ages of 1 and 5 he drank cow's milk with no problem. Have you tried your baby on a soy formula (Isomil is what we used)? I wish you luck in finding something that will help your babies. I know how tough it is to have little ones that don't feel well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
My son reacted the same way to milk formula that your 5 month old is. We put him on soy formula and he did fine. He is now 8 and is lactose intolerant. Strangely enough, between the ages of 1 and 5 he drank cow's milk with no problem. Have you tried your baby on a soy formula (Isomil is what we used)? I wish you luck in finding something that will help your babies. I know how tough it is to have little ones that don't feel well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When my 5 year old was a baby we tried her on soy very early but she became so constipated she developed a belly button hernia and I had to use suppositories on her until she was about 4 months old. We took her off soy shortly after trying it. Now with my 5 month old we did try soy but it did not help her. Alimentum is for allergies to both milk and soy formulas. I might try her again on soy to see if it makes a difference before I put her back on the Alimentum because it's soooo expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When my 5 year old was a baby we tried her on soy very early but she became so constipated she developed a belly button hernia and I had to use suppositories on her until she was about 4 months old. We took her off soy shortly after trying it. Now with my 5 month old we did try soy but it did not help her. Alimentum is for allergies to both milk and soy formulas. I might try her again on soy to see if it makes a difference before I put her back on the Alimentum because it's soooo expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Mixing the two probably gave your baby more gas. I don't believe you can mix those formulas. I agree with the previous post and the soy. Both my kids were on soy and did great. Beware of "transferrance". That is the mental process that medical professionals are warned against inmed school. That is, every time we study a disease we think we have it. I do not believe a 5 yr. old can have ibs and I would only listen to a seasoned specialist, not an intern in that case.Have a positive mental attitude and if you are not satisfied with your current pediatrician, perhaps you could find another. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Mixing the two probably gave your baby more gas. I don't believe you can mix those formulas. I agree with the previous post and the soy. Both my kids were on soy and did great. Beware of "transferrance". That is the mental process that medical professionals are warned against inmed school. That is, every time we study a disease we think we have it. I do not believe a 5 yr. old can have ibs and I would only listen to a seasoned specialist, not an intern in that case.Have a positive mental attitude and if you are not satisfied with your current pediatrician, perhaps you could find another. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,922 Posts
Actually, admflo, children CAN get IBS. Read this article from the National Digestive Diseases Institute, located at :http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health/digest/summary/ibskids/ Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive disorder that causes abdominal pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea, and constipation--or some combination of these problems. IBS affects people of all ages, including children.IBS is classified as a functional disorder because it is caused by a problem in how the intestines, or bowels, work. People with IBS tend to have overly sensitive intestines that have muscle spasms in response to food, gas, and sometimes stress. These spasms may cause pain, diarrhea, and constipation. In children, IBS tends to be either diarrhea-predominant or pain-predominant. Diarrhea-predominant IBS is most common in children under age 3. The diarrhea is usually painless and alternates with bouts of constipation. These children usually have fewer than five stools a day, and the stools tend to be watery and soft. Pain-predominant IBS mainly affects children over age 5. In the younger children the pain tends to occur around the navel area, and in older children, in the lower left part of the abdomen. The pain is crampy and gets worse with eating and better after passing stool or gas.In addition to the symptoms described above, children with IBS may also have headache, nausea, or mucus in the stool. Weight loss may occur if a child eats less to try to avoid pain. Some children first develop symptoms after a stressful event, such as teething, a bout with the flu, school problems, or problems at home. Stress does not cause IBS, but it can trigger symptoms. To diagnose IBS, the doctor will ask questions about symptoms and examine the child to rule out the possibility of more serious problems or diseases. IBS is not a disease--it is a syndrome, or group of symptoms that occur together. It does not damage the intestine, so if the physical exam and other tests show no sign of disease or damage, the doctor may diagnose IBS.In children, IBS is treated mainly through changes in diet--eating more fiber and less fat to help prevent spasms--and through bowel training to teach the child to empty the bowels at regular, specific times during the day. Medications like laxatives are rarely prescribed because children are more susceptible to addiction than adults. When laxatives are necessary, parents must follow the doctor's instructions carefully. Learning stress management techniques may help some children.More information is available fromInternational Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal DisordersP.O. Box 17864Milwaukee, WI 53217Tel: (414) 964-1799 or (888) 964-2001E-mail: iffgd###iffgd.orgHome page: www.iffgd.org/-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Additional Information on Irritable Bowel SyndromeThe National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse collects resource information on digestive diseases for the Combined Health Information Database (CHID). CHID is a database produced by health-related agencies of the Federal Government. This database provides titles, abstracts, and availability information for health information and health education resources.To provide you with the most up-to-date resources, information specialists at the clearinghouse created an automatic search of CHID. To obtain this information you may view the results of the automatic search on Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Or, if you wish to perform your own search of the database, you may access the CHID Online web site and search CHID yourself.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse2 Information WayBethesda, MD 20892-3570E-mail: National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. NDDIC answers inquiries; develops, reviews, and distributes publications; and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.Publications produced by the clearinghouse are carefully reviewed for scientific accuracy, content, and readability. This e-text is not copyrighted. The clearinghouse encourages users of this e-pub to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------NIH Publication No. 99-4640e-text last updated: February 2000
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,922 Posts
Actually, admflo, children CAN get IBS. Read this article from the National Digestive Diseases Institute, located at :http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health/digest/summary/ibskids/ Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive disorder that causes abdominal pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea, and constipation--or some combination of these problems. IBS affects people of all ages, including children.IBS is classified as a functional disorder because it is caused by a problem in how the intestines, or bowels, work. People with IBS tend to have overly sensitive intestines that have muscle spasms in response to food, gas, and sometimes stress. These spasms may cause pain, diarrhea, and constipation. In children, IBS tends to be either diarrhea-predominant or pain-predominant. Diarrhea-predominant IBS is most common in children under age 3. The diarrhea is usually painless and alternates with bouts of constipation. These children usually have fewer than five stools a day, and the stools tend to be watery and soft. Pain-predominant IBS mainly affects children over age 5. In the younger children the pain tends to occur around the navel area, and in older children, in the lower left part of the abdomen. The pain is crampy and gets worse with eating and better after passing stool or gas.In addition to the symptoms described above, children with IBS may also have headache, nausea, or mucus in the stool. Weight loss may occur if a child eats less to try to avoid pain. Some children first develop symptoms after a stressful event, such as teething, a bout with the flu, school problems, or problems at home. Stress does not cause IBS, but it can trigger symptoms. To diagnose IBS, the doctor will ask questions about symptoms and examine the child to rule out the possibility of more serious problems or diseases. IBS is not a disease--it is a syndrome, or group of symptoms that occur together. It does not damage the intestine, so if the physical exam and other tests show no sign of disease or damage, the doctor may diagnose IBS.In children, IBS is treated mainly through changes in diet--eating more fiber and less fat to help prevent spasms--and through bowel training to teach the child to empty the bowels at regular, specific times during the day. Medications like laxatives are rarely prescribed because children are more susceptible to addiction than adults. When laxatives are necessary, parents must follow the doctor's instructions carefully. Learning stress management techniques may help some children.More information is available fromInternational Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal DisordersP.O. Box 17864Milwaukee, WI 53217Tel: (414) 964-1799 or (888) 964-2001E-mail: iffgd###iffgd.orgHome page: www.iffgd.org/-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Additional Information on Irritable Bowel SyndromeThe National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse collects resource information on digestive diseases for the Combined Health Information Database (CHID). CHID is a database produced by health-related agencies of the Federal Government. This database provides titles, abstracts, and availability information for health information and health education resources.To provide you with the most up-to-date resources, information specialists at the clearinghouse created an automatic search of CHID. To obtain this information you may view the results of the automatic search on Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Or, if you wish to perform your own search of the database, you may access the CHID Online web site and search CHID yourself.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse2 Information WayBethesda, MD 20892-3570E-mail: National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. NDDIC answers inquiries; develops, reviews, and distributes publications; and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.Publications produced by the clearinghouse are carefully reviewed for scientific accuracy, content, and readability. This e-text is not copyrighted. The clearinghouse encourages users of this e-pub to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------NIH Publication No. 99-4640e-text last updated: February 2000
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
I had the same problems with my 6 week old that your having. I found that he can tolerate Enfamil Prosobee which is soy but he could not tolerate Isomil and there both soy. You might want to give that a shot. I do know your not supposed to mix formulas so that could have caused some of the problems. Also it takes about a week before you know how their bodies will react to change so give it time. Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
I had the same problems with my 6 week old that your having. I found that he can tolerate Enfamil Prosobee which is soy but he could not tolerate Isomil and there both soy. You might want to give that a shot. I do know your not supposed to mix formulas so that could have caused some of the problems. Also it takes about a week before you know how their bodies will react to change so give it time. Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
My daughter at 3 months started projetile vomiting. It was like the excorsit or something. I thought she was possesed.
No but it scared me half to death. I switched her to soy. Then a few months later I was picking her up at the babysitters and the sitter anounced she gave her a taste of ice cream. She had hives all around where the milk mixed with her saliva. For six years she would break out if anything had milk. I got great at reading lables and dropped the ball on breakfast bars. The ingrediant was listed farther down the list. Ooops. It was fun doing easter baskets without chocolate. Sorbet was a good treat for her. But needless to say she out grew it when she was six. Shes 16 now. Shes not allergic anymore. But she has never been able to tolerate alot at once. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
My daughter at 3 months started projetile vomiting. It was like the excorsit or something. I thought she was possesed.
No but it scared me half to death. I switched her to soy. Then a few months later I was picking her up at the babysitters and the sitter anounced she gave her a taste of ice cream. She had hives all around where the milk mixed with her saliva. For six years she would break out if anything had milk. I got great at reading lables and dropped the ball on breakfast bars. The ingrediant was listed farther down the list. Ooops. It was fun doing easter baskets without chocolate. Sorbet was a good treat for her. But needless to say she out grew it when she was six. Shes 16 now. Shes not allergic anymore. But she has never been able to tolerate alot at once. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
I do recall my youngest daughter ( at the age of around 2) being diagnosed as having some thing called "toddler diarhoea", the " cure" for which was more fibre in the way of root vegetables, fresh fruit etc. It didn't really work and in the end it all seemed to clear up spontaneously. I would be exptremely wary of labelling a child that young. To me that could be just as damaging as when I was little and grown-ups used to insist on you taking syrup-of-figs if you didn't "go" once a day.liz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
I do recall my youngest daughter ( at the age of around 2) being diagnosed as having some thing called "toddler diarhoea", the " cure" for which was more fibre in the way of root vegetables, fresh fruit etc. It didn't really work and in the end it all seemed to clear up spontaneously. I would be exptremely wary of labelling a child that young. To me that could be just as damaging as when I was little and grown-ups used to insist on you taking syrup-of-figs if you didn't "go" once a day.liz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
My son had IBS for about 6 months when he was 2 years old. He had D everyday but otherwise fine and healthy and not losing weight. His pediatrician at the time ordered no tests and started an elimination diet which was very frustrating when you have a picky two year old. Nothing helped. We added foods rich in iron, we eliminated fatty foods etc. nothing. For this and other reasons I switched pediatricians and the new one immediately ordered tests for giardia, salmonella and other well known D causing germs. All negative. The Dr. asked me if we had taken him to any fast food restaurants and in fact we had for the first time right around the time he started the D. He told me that he probably had some tainted food which caused a slight food poisoning incident which pushed the IBS into action. He said he had seen many cases like that (he was about 60 years old at the time) and he said it would last about 6 months or so. Damned if the D stopped 6 months later. Needless to say I stayed with that Dr. till he just retired last year. Hopefully, your kids problems will go away too but I'm convinced kids can certainly have IBS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
My son had IBS for about 6 months when he was 2 years old. He had D everyday but otherwise fine and healthy and not losing weight. His pediatrician at the time ordered no tests and started an elimination diet which was very frustrating when you have a picky two year old. Nothing helped. We added foods rich in iron, we eliminated fatty foods etc. nothing. For this and other reasons I switched pediatricians and the new one immediately ordered tests for giardia, salmonella and other well known D causing germs. All negative. The Dr. asked me if we had taken him to any fast food restaurants and in fact we had for the first time right around the time he started the D. He told me that he probably had some tainted food which caused a slight food poisoning incident which pushed the IBS into action. He said he had seen many cases like that (he was about 60 years old at the time) and he said it would last about 6 months or so. Damned if the D stopped 6 months later. Needless to say I stayed with that Dr. till he just retired last year. Hopefully, your kids problems will go away too but I'm convinced kids can certainly have IBS.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top