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My wife, 60, often has diarrhea but sometimes with cramps and once in a while cold sweats and passing out during the cramping. Could this be IBS? Has anyone else here had this?Her sister has as well as her daughter (but without the fainting).
 

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George, your wife should see a doctor about this, there can be many reasons for fainting. One is over stimulation of the vagus nerve which connects the gut brain to the brain, but a doctor should see her to find out the cause of the fainting.General Fainting InformationFainting is the sudden, temporary loss of consciousness due to a lack of oxygen to the brain. Fainting is not a condition itself, but rather a symptom of something else going on in the body. Many conditions can cause a person to faint, including heart problems, seizures, panic attacks, hypoglycemia and blood pressure problems. Although fainting usually occurs in conjunction with a medical condition, a perfectly healthy person can faint, as well.Possible Causes of FaintingCauses of fainting include overstimulation of the vagus nerve (which helps to control breathing and blood circulation); severe pain; stress; fear; hunger; standing up suddenly after sitting for a long time. People with drastic changes in blood pressure can also experience fainting.Fainting is often a symptom of a number of medical conditions including: Diseases of the autonomic nervous system Diseases that interfere with blood pressure and heart rate, like diabetes, alcoholism and malnutrition. Heart problems that affect blood flow to the brain, such as arrhythmia and blood clots Conditions that affect the stimulation of particular nerves Hyperventilation Possible Symptoms of FaintingSymptoms of fainting differ depending on the origin of the problem. A person who is about to faint may experience one or more of these common pre-fainting symptoms: dizziness sweating weakness headache blurred vision black out vertigo tinnitus nausea vomiting shortness of breath incontinencePossible Lifestyle Changes for FaintingA person who is prone to fainting should identify his fainting triggers and work to avoid those triggers. Be sure to eat regularly, stand up slowly and drink plenty of fluids. Watch for warning signs of fainting, such as nausea, dizziness and sweating, and sit down to avoid falling. If fainting becomes frequent, see a doctor for a medical evaluation."
 

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George, your wife should see a doctor about this, there can be many reasons for fainting. One is over stimulation of the vagus nerve which connects the gut brain to the brain, but a doctor should see her to find out the cause of the fainting.General Fainting InformationFainting is the sudden, temporary loss of consciousness due to a lack of oxygen to the brain. Fainting is not a condition itself, but rather a symptom of something else going on in the body. Many conditions can cause a person to faint, including heart problems, seizures, panic attacks, hypoglycemia and blood pressure problems. Although fainting usually occurs in conjunction with a medical condition, a perfectly healthy person can faint, as well.Possible Causes of FaintingCauses of fainting include overstimulation of the vagus nerve (which helps to control breathing and blood circulation); severe pain; stress; fear; hunger; standing up suddenly after sitting for a long time. People with drastic changes in blood pressure can also experience fainting.Fainting is often a symptom of a number of medical conditions including: Diseases of the autonomic nervous system Diseases that interfere with blood pressure and heart rate, like diabetes, alcoholism and malnutrition. Heart problems that affect blood flow to the brain, such as arrhythmia and blood clots Conditions that affect the stimulation of particular nerves Hyperventilation Possible Symptoms of FaintingSymptoms of fainting differ depending on the origin of the problem. A person who is about to faint may experience one or more of these common pre-fainting symptoms: dizziness sweating weakness headache blurred vision black out vertigo tinnitus nausea vomiting shortness of breath incontinencePossible Lifestyle Changes for FaintingA person who is prone to fainting should identify his fainting triggers and work to avoid those triggers. Be sure to eat regularly, stand up slowly and drink plenty of fluids. Watch for warning signs of fainting, such as nausea, dizziness and sweating, and sit down to avoid falling. If fainting becomes frequent, see a doctor for a medical evaluation."
 

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I agree...the cramps and diarrhea are IBS, but the cold sweat and fainting sound much more like a vasovagal reaction (vagus nerve getting stimulated by the other symptoms)
quote:Anyone can have vasovagal syncope given an adequate triggering event, but many people are particularly prone to these episodes, and often with relatively mild triggers. These individuals tend to relate histories of syncope dating back to adolescence, and frequently will describe several different of triggering events. While, as noted, there are scores of possible triggering events for vasovagal syncope, some are quite characteristic and almost always point to vasovagal syncope. Syncope occurring after urinating, defecating, coughing or swallowing, or syncope associated with pain, fright, the sight of blood, or other noxious stimuli, is almost always vasovagal.In these and other ways, vasovagal syncope tends to be highly situational. It is more likely to occur after a viral illness, after exercise, after a warm shower, or early in the morning � any time that relative dehydration is present, and dilation of the blood vessels in the legs would be more likely to produce a significant drop in blood pressure. Furthermore, vasovagal syncope is often preceded by a few seconds or a few minutes of warning symptoms. Often, these symptoms include lightheadedness, ringing in the ears, visual disturbances, sweating and/or nausea. Because of such �warning symptoms,� people who have had one or two episodes of syncope are frequently able to tell when an event is about to occur. And importantly, if they recognize the warning symptoms, they are able to abort the blackout simply by lying down and elevating the legs. (�Aborting� syncope is not possible with most other forms of syncope.)
http://heartdisease.about.com/cs/arrhythmi.../Syncope2_2.htm K.
 

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I agree...the cramps and diarrhea are IBS, but the cold sweat and fainting sound much more like a vasovagal reaction (vagus nerve getting stimulated by the other symptoms)
quote:Anyone can have vasovagal syncope given an adequate triggering event, but many people are particularly prone to these episodes, and often with relatively mild triggers. These individuals tend to relate histories of syncope dating back to adolescence, and frequently will describe several different of triggering events. While, as noted, there are scores of possible triggering events for vasovagal syncope, some are quite characteristic and almost always point to vasovagal syncope. Syncope occurring after urinating, defecating, coughing or swallowing, or syncope associated with pain, fright, the sight of blood, or other noxious stimuli, is almost always vasovagal.In these and other ways, vasovagal syncope tends to be highly situational. It is more likely to occur after a viral illness, after exercise, after a warm shower, or early in the morning � any time that relative dehydration is present, and dilation of the blood vessels in the legs would be more likely to produce a significant drop in blood pressure. Furthermore, vasovagal syncope is often preceded by a few seconds or a few minutes of warning symptoms. Often, these symptoms include lightheadedness, ringing in the ears, visual disturbances, sweating and/or nausea. Because of such �warning symptoms,� people who have had one or two episodes of syncope are frequently able to tell when an event is about to occur. And importantly, if they recognize the warning symptoms, they are able to abort the blackout simply by lying down and elevating the legs. (�Aborting� syncope is not possible with most other forms of syncope.)
http://heartdisease.about.com/cs/arrhythmi.../Syncope2_2.htm K.
 

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HiDont panic, this happens to me too, the pain brings fear which makes the heart beat faster which makes you faint, and also when you are having a bowel movement your bp drops so its nothing to be alarmed about, when I come round I am in a sweat and feel dreadful, but the Drs say its okay, this has happend twice this year, how often is this happening to your wife? it its more than this I would suggest like the above posts that she is checked over regardless anyway, let me know how you get on.Shes not alone.... Does she fit too?Imodium really help, they take away the D and pain, I take one every night, Sam.
 

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HiDont panic, this happens to me too, the pain brings fear which makes the heart beat faster which makes you faint, and also when you are having a bowel movement your bp drops so its nothing to be alarmed about, when I come round I am in a sweat and feel dreadful, but the Drs say its okay, this has happend twice this year, how often is this happening to your wife? it its more than this I would suggest like the above posts that she is checked over regardless anyway, let me know how you get on.Shes not alone.... Does she fit too?Imodium really help, they take away the D and pain, I take one every night, Sam.
 

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i find i go hot and cold, experience flu like symtpoms (without going on to having the flu)some times i feel like im going to faint but i have not so far.i also have very painful cramps (spasms) which can literally be unbearable. My sweating i guess can be down to a hysterectomy i had several years ago.Good luck george i hope your wife gets some much deserved relief
 

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i find i go hot and cold, experience flu like symtpoms (without going on to having the flu)some times i feel like im going to faint but i have not so far.i also have very painful cramps (spasms) which can literally be unbearable. My sweating i guess can be down to a hysterectomy i had several years ago.Good luck george i hope your wife gets some much deserved relief
 

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This happens to me every once in awhile, luckily not too often. I will get severe cramping all across my stomach and back and will be drenched in sweat within a few minutes. Then after a few minutes I will usually get the chills and turn pretty pasty looking. I have only fainted a couple of times. Even though I feel cold from the chills I find that laying on a cold surface, such as the bathroom floor usually makes me feel better. I've read a lot of other posts from people who have also experienced this same thing.
 

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This happens to me every once in awhile, luckily not too often. I will get severe cramping all across my stomach and back and will be drenched in sweat within a few minutes. Then after a few minutes I will usually get the chills and turn pretty pasty looking. I have only fainted a couple of times. Even though I feel cold from the chills I find that laying on a cold surface, such as the bathroom floor usually makes me feel better. I've read a lot of other posts from people who have also experienced this same thing.
 

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I've had this happen once or twice in my life. Cold seems to help. I poured a cold pitcher of water out of the frige over my heard during the last one, thankfully several years ago. It "shocked" me back to normal. I think the pain in my guts made me have a panic attack. I hope I NEVER have another one!
 

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I've had this happen once or twice in my life. Cold seems to help. I poured a cold pitcher of water out of the frige over my heard during the last one, thankfully several years ago. It "shocked" me back to normal. I think the pain in my guts made me have a panic attack. I hope I NEVER have another one!
 

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George, If you look under the recent thread entitled 'Fainting' in the Diarrhoea forum, you will see some more discussion of this subject. I am prone to frequent fainting due to vasovagal syncope and, also, postural tachycardia syndrome. The severe cramping that sometimes accompanies diarrhoea is one of the many things that triggers my fainting. As Eric said, it's due to the overstimulation of the vagus nerve. (Straining hard for a bowel movement when you're constipated can also cause a vasovagal faint.) As Eric also said, your wife should be fully checked out by a doctor to make sure that her fainting is vasovagal. The doctor should also be able to advise her about what she can do to help the situation. There are treatments which can help but they might not be necessary if this is the only situation that makes her faint. Of course, fainting in the bathroom can often result in nasty bumps to the head so, if you haven't already done so, it would be a good idea to see if there's anything you can do to make the bathroom safer.
 

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George, If you look under the recent thread entitled 'Fainting' in the Diarrhoea forum, you will see some more discussion of this subject. I am prone to frequent fainting due to vasovagal syncope and, also, postural tachycardia syndrome. The severe cramping that sometimes accompanies diarrhoea is one of the many things that triggers my fainting. As Eric said, it's due to the overstimulation of the vagus nerve. (Straining hard for a bowel movement when you're constipated can also cause a vasovagal faint.) As Eric also said, your wife should be fully checked out by a doctor to make sure that her fainting is vasovagal. The doctor should also be able to advise her about what she can do to help the situation. There are treatments which can help but they might not be necessary if this is the only situation that makes her faint. Of course, fainting in the bathroom can often result in nasty bumps to the head so, if you haven't already done so, it would be a good idea to see if there's anything you can do to make the bathroom safer.
 
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