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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,I've been stuck in an awful flare up lately. I am a mixed C and D type but mostly C with D during that wonderful time of the month. Ever since the summer started I've been having problems with D! I've been getting nasty attacks. The heat here has been no less then unbearable. I am wondering if anyone else has had this problem. I have another question, has anyone's attacks ever been triggered by thunderstorms? I was fine until 2 hours ago when we had a line of storms with non-stop lightning. They lasted for about 2 hours. It seemed to cause me to have an attack. I am wondering if this has ever happened to someone else.Teresa
 

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I wouldn't say I'd noticed a proper link but the weather does affect me more psychologically which then tends to affect my stomach. Like if it's raining loads then I tend to feel more miserable that when it's sunny. And if it's real bad weather I also feel a bit "trapped" in the house which makes me more anxious and worry about whether other people in the house are keeping the bathroom out of my reach and so on. So there does seem to be a link in that respect!
 

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I'm not sure about what the weather does.. but I know that when I'm feeling "sick" that I get all hot and flushed, so when it's hot out or I'm in warm weather and sweating I feel like I'm going to be "sick." It kinda sucks not going outside or hanging by the pool because the warmness makes me feel worse. I've never noticed anyting around thunderstorms though. Feel well!
 

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I've read that IBS tends to act up in the summer or in a hot climate. I know I feel generally ill whenever the heat goes above 90 degrees. Nothing unmanageable but I just feel flushed, icky tired...
 

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We are having a really hot summer in Ohio and all summer I have been having one D attack after another. I am terrified of lightening and thunder and so I always have an attack during one. How horrible if I got struck by lightening on the toliet while having D!!!!!Poor paramedics!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's what's killing me. I am usually C predominantly, but lately it's been the D or things have been loose. Put it his way, C ISN'T a problem. I've been in a lot more pain and having a lot more problems. PA has been having a HORRIBLY hot summer.Teresa
 

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Hi,Just thought this info would be of interest, it is an excerpt from Heather Van Vorous' "IBS the first year" book and there definately is a connection between the heat and an increase in symptoms of IBS. Hope this helps, and that it will cool down a bit for you soon.
quote: It's not the heat, it's the humidity…literallyThe climate in which you live can make a substantial difference in the frequency and severity of your attacks. Hot, humid weather in particular is actually a stress factor in and of itself, because 1) heat stresses the body, and 2) air pressure changes from humidity affect the levels of serotonin in the body (and over 90% of that serotonin is in your gut), which in turn reduces your pain tolerance level. You may also find that, personally, some types of weather just stress you out and make you depressed, irritable, or unhappy. It doesn't matter if your preferences seem typical or even logical (maybe you hate blue skies and love drizzle) - what's important is that you consciously note your feelings and physical reactions so that you can deal with them. While you can't change the weather, of course, you can control where you live. Moving to a different region may sound like a drastic step to take to minimize IBS attacks, but if your local climate is seriously compromising your health you might want to at least consider it. I lived in New England for seven horrendously miserable years and spent every summer battling desperately to maintain stable health in the face of quite literally sickening hot, humid summers. I realized in the end that when I fight my body, my body wins, so I moved back home to the Pacific Northwest where heat and humidity never co-exist. This completely eliminated a serious recurring stress factor from my life. My colon is now much calmer and happier, and so am I. Was the temporary stress of moving worth the permanently beneficial end result? You darn well bet it was.
 
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