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Around a week and a half 2 weeks ago I started with a pain just inbetween my rib cage and just underneath the right hand side of my rib cage.I was told by the doctor that this was indigestion and given gaviscon, that did nothing. I returned to the doctor and again was told I was suffering from indigestion and was this time prescribed Rabeprazole.Sometimes I suffer from back ache and my ribs also ache, when this occurs I usually take parcetamol. The rabeprazole dosnt seem to do much really to ease the pain.I have suffered no problems eating, no weight loss, I do suffer from wind sometimes, I have no coughing, its not very often I regurgitate (sp?)To me this just dosnt sound like Gerd or indigestion. I do suffer from UC, but it seems the pain is too high up in the ab for it to be that.Any ideas what this could be.ThanksRach
 

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Hmmm....I don't know if that's what it is or not. I have been diagnosed with GERD and have been dealing with it for about 3-4 years now. Before I was diagnosed, there were times I would wake from a sound sleep and be hyperventilating and feel the other symptoms of GERD as well. The odd thing at that time was that I never had any of the typical things happen like having those symptoms after drinking soft drinks. At that time, I was in college and had no health insurance and was away from home without any real primary care doctor. Once I was able to get good health insurance and went to see a gastroenterologist, I was diagnosed with GERD and put on Prilosec after testing. I was doing well until I had to have my gall bladder removed about a month ago. About a week after my surgery, I felt these sharp pains almost in my chest. It hurt so bad I thought I was having a heart attack at first. Since I had no other symptoms, and the pain only lasted a short time, I figured it was not a heart attack and that I would tell my doctor about it the next time I saw her. Last weekend, I ended up in the emergency room with the same type of pain, and it was by far one of the most painful feelings I've ever had. They did an EKG and chest x-rays which were both normal. They also did enough blood work to determine that I didn't have a blood clot. Then they wrote me a prescription for Librax, gave a g.i. cocktail, and a shot of pain medicine and sent me on my way. Unfortunately, since I have other problems as well, I was unable to make it in to see her. I am supposed to see her tomorrow, and I really hope I find a solution because I cannot live like I have been. I should also add that quite a few people have told me that they have had episodes with GERD that are so strong and painful, that they even have the same symptoms as heart attacks, including things like pain radiating down their arms. Its very strange.
 

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I too am having the same thing, I have UC but I realise this is to high up to be that, everytime I eat I feel like I am having a heart attack, the pain even shoots into my arm, I know it is not my heart as I had a full work up last year, when I had pancreatis, they also thought that was a heart attack, I have been trying to call the doctor to tell him what is happening but they are not returning my call. let me know what you find out.
 

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10 Questions and Answers about Heartburn Question #: 1 What is Heartburn? Answer: A burning feeling behind your breastbone. Heartburn is a symptom, meaning something that you can feel. Heartburn often starts as a burning feeling that start behind the breastbone, and moves up into the throat. It can cause a sour taste in your mouth. You may actually spit some stomach acid. Sometimes, it feels like outright chest pain, which can be accompanies by nausea. Some may actually develop hoarseness, a cough or even shortness of breath.Question #: 2 Why Do I Have Heartburn? Heartburn is more common than the common cold. Answer: Heartburn is very common. More than 60 million American adults suffer from heartburn at least once a month, which is the same number of people that come down with the common cold each year. Approximately 25 million adults suffer from heartburn every single day of the year.Question #: 3 Is Heartburn is often the symptom of a disease that doctors call GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease?Answer: Yes. While the term may be mouthful, gastroesophageal reflux disease is actually a very accurate term to describe what's going on. Heartburn is the symptom, or feeling that we experience.Sometimes heartburn is an occasional event, which occurs after we eat a large meal. Or, when it is ongoing, heartburn heralds the presence of GERD, or a digestive disorder that affects the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Heartburn actually has nothing to do with heart, but results when stomach contents, containing acidic juices, moves from your stomach back up into your esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach). The backward flow, also called reflux, typically occurs when the LES or lower esophageal sphincter (which sits between the bottom of the esophagus and the top of the stomach) is weak or relaxes inappropriately. The opened muscle thus allows the contents of the stomach to come back up into the esophagus. Several factors can interfere with the LES from working properly. The severity of heartburn or GERD depends on how dysfunctional the LES is, and how much acid fluid makes it way back up the esophagus.Question #: 4 What foods and liquids that can contribute to heartburn?Answer: A number of food and liquids can set the stage for heartburn. They can work to open the lower esophageal muscle abnormally, such as mints, chocolate, fats or spicy foods. Others contribute to acid in the stomach, which means if reflux does occur, the contents that splash back up into the esophagus are more irritating. Anything that increases pressure on the contents of the stomach can contribute to reflux as well. And don't forget about alcohol, it both relaxes the lower esophageal sphincter muscle and may irritate the mucous membrane that lines the esophagus. Alcohol can be a double-whammy. It's important for you to pay attention to which kinds of food give you the most trouble, and then work to avoid them.Question #: 5 What are some other factors that can contribute to heartburn?Answer: Smoking, being overweight, wearing tight fitting clothes, diabetes all contribute to heartburn. People with diabetes mellitus, are at increase risk of heartburn. These very same people often have weight to lose. The good news about all of the factors is that they can be modified or controlled. If you smoke, QUIT (for all kinds of reasons). Cigarette smoking weakens the lower esophageal muscle.Being overweight puts considerable pressure on the stomach, increasing the likelihood of reflux, as does wearing tight clothes. Question #: 6 Can a heart attack can feel like heartburn, and it is difficult to tell the two apart?Answer: Sometimes the pain caused by a heart attack and the discomfort caused by heartburn is very difficult to distinguish. Sometimes, doctors need to use sophisticated equipment and blood tests to determine whether or not a heart attack is in process. And to make matters even more complicated, those who are prone to heart attacks are also prone to heartburn: people over 40, who are overweight and smoke. That's why all chest pain needs to be taken seriously!Question #: 7 What are other things you should do in addition to lifestyle and dietary changes to get rid of heartburn. Answer: A number of lifestyle and dietary changes can be made to lessen the burn of heartburn. First, avoiding foods that contribute to the problem is key. Second, eating a number of smaller meals and/or smaller portions of food can also help to control symptoms. Avoid eating meals before bedtime, and forget about the mid-night snacks. This will lessen the amount of contents in the stomach that is available for reflux, and also cut down on the acid in the contents. Losing weight and walking or staying upright after meals will help as well. Question #: 8 What are some other lifestyle changes that will help?Answer: Elevating the head of the bed on 6-inch blocks or sleeping on a specially designed wedge can help a lot at nighttime. These maneuvers reduce heartburn by allowing gravity to help keep stomach contents in place. By avoiding bending over or wearing tight clothes, you take pressure off the stomach, and thus lessening the chance of reflux. Question #: 9 What are the different kinds of medication, antacids, which can help treat heartburn?.Answer: Today, there is a wide range of medications, both over-the counter and prescription, which is advertised toto help alleviate heartburn. Over the counter antacids (like Maalox, Mylanta, Tums and Rolaids) could help temporarily but actually makes things worse. Over-the-counter acid blockers, like Pepcid AC, Zantac 75, and Tagamet HB has also been used to help alleviate symptoms of mild cases. If heartburn is an ongoing problem (more than 3 weeks), you should make some lifestyle changes that best suit your specific problem...and the best and most effective alternative would be to take a natural supplement that has no side effects. An effective plant-based digestive enzyme products has shown to give excellent results in the treating the cause ..and not just the symptoms, thereby eliminating the unhealthy condition. www.ultimate-enzymes.comQuestion #: 10 Can heartburn or GERD, can cause serious complications?Answer: While heartburn, or GERD, is rarely life threatening it can have some serious consequences if left untreated for a long period. Most of the complications involve damage to the esophagus, which results from the esophageal lining being repeated exposed to the corrosive acid in the stomach contents. These problems can include inflammation, ulcer formation, bleeding and scarring. Barrett's esophagus is a condition that involves severe damage to the mucous lining of the esophagus. Doctors believe that Barrett's may be a precursor to esophageal cancer. GERD can also on occasion contribute to chronic cough and asthma, however it does not result in pneumococcal pneumonia, which is caused by an organism.
 
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