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seems like one of the better sources of info? I like their description of motility (one of three characteristics of IBS that have been identified."Altered GI motility includes distinct aberrations in small and large bowel motility. The myoelectric activity of the colon is composed of background slow waves with superimposed spike potentials. Colonic dysmotility in IBS manifests as variations in slow-wave frequency and a blunted, late-peaking, postprandial response of spike potentials. Patients who are prone to diarrhea demonstrate this disparity to a greater degree than patients who are prone to constipation. Small bowel dysmotility manifests in delayed meal transit in patients prone to constipation and in accelerated meal transit in patients prone to diarrhea. In addition, patients exhibit shorter intervals between migratory motor complexes (the predominant interdigestive small bowel motor patterns). Current theories integrate these widespread motility aberrations and hypothesize a generalized smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness. They describe increased urinary symptoms, including frequency, urgency, nocturia, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge. Visceral hyperalgesia is the second part of the 3-part complex that characterizes IBS."this makes sense to me but I'm not sure if others hereunderstand. how clear is it to you?tom
 

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seems like one of the better sources of info? I like their description of motility (one of three characteristics of IBS that have been identified."Altered GI motility includes distinct aberrations in small and large bowel motility. The myoelectric activity of the colon is composed of background slow waves with superimposed spike potentials. Colonic dysmotility in IBS manifests as variations in slow-wave frequency and a blunted, late-peaking, postprandial response of spike potentials. Patients who are prone to diarrhea demonstrate this disparity to a greater degree than patients who are prone to constipation. Small bowel dysmotility manifests in delayed meal transit in patients prone to constipation and in accelerated meal transit in patients prone to diarrhea. In addition, patients exhibit shorter intervals between migratory motor complexes (the predominant interdigestive small bowel motor patterns). Current theories integrate these widespread motility aberrations and hypothesize a generalized smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness. They describe increased urinary symptoms, including frequency, urgency, nocturia, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge. Visceral hyperalgesia is the second part of the 3-part complex that characterizes IBS."this makes sense to me but I'm not sure if others hereunderstand. how clear is it to you?tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is interesting. Although just for the info, make sure your not having a real heart attack.Interesting test, the splenic flexture is one area I had pain in IBS."Pain from presumed gas pockets in the splenic flexure may masquerade as anterior chest pain or left upper quadrant abdominal pain. This splenic flexure syndrome is demonstrable by balloon inflation in the splenic flexure and should be considered in the differential of chest or left upper quadrant abdominal pain.Pain from presumed gas pockets in the splenic flexure may masquerade as anterior chest pain or left upper quadrant abdominal pain. This splenic flexure syndrome is demonstrable by balloon inflation in the splenic flexure and should be considered in the differential of chest or left upper quadrant abdominal pain."Admittedly this is kindof technical, but also has some good basic info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is interesting. Although just for the info, make sure your not having a real heart attack.Interesting test, the splenic flexture is one area I had pain in IBS."Pain from presumed gas pockets in the splenic flexure may masquerade as anterior chest pain or left upper quadrant abdominal pain. This splenic flexure syndrome is demonstrable by balloon inflation in the splenic flexure and should be considered in the differential of chest or left upper quadrant abdominal pain.Pain from presumed gas pockets in the splenic flexure may masquerade as anterior chest pain or left upper quadrant abdominal pain. This splenic flexure syndrome is demonstrable by balloon inflation in the splenic flexure and should be considered in the differential of chest or left upper quadrant abdominal pain."Admittedly this is kindof technical, but also has some good basic info.
 
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