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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.dcnutrition.com/fattyacids/
quote: Linoleic acid (omega 6 fatty acid) serves as the parent of a large polyunsaturated fatty acid, called ARACHIDONIC ACID. Arachidonic acid in turn forms PROSTAGLANDINS (PGE2) and thromboxanes (TXA,), hormone-like lipids that tend to promote blood clotting, induce pain and inflammation and cause smooth muscle contraction . Another pathway converts arachidonic acid to LEUKOTRIENES, one of the most powerful inflammatory agents.
http://www.dcnutrition.com/fattyacids/ The link above explains how an overindulgence of so-called healthy fat like (corn oil, canola, sunflower...) may actually be harmful.I have read this type of research repeatedly and i am very convinced of it.i think that when the ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 becomes too heavily stacked in favor of omeg 6's --then, trouble can start. Our ancestors had a ratio that was 3 to 1. Today it is closer to 25 to 1. That spells trouble.Do I think that this is the cause of IBS? No. However, i think that many factors can contribute to the onset of IBS and why would anyone want to stack the deck against themselves through nutritional negligence?The immune and nervous system are heavily dependant upon "good fats" like omega 3 fatty acids. However, once I became ill the inclusion of healthy fats gave minimal results.Today, I have banished all seed oils. I use olive oil, coconut oil (high in easily absorbed MCT's and potent antifungal fats like lauric acid found in high concentration in breast milk), also flax seed (omega 3's), cod oil, and fish body oils.For 20 years I was a strict consumer of seed oils. I thought they were healthy. Now i know that they are subject to high degrees of oxidation. Omega 3's like flax oil are the same way. I am also a big believer in the use of vit E and C to help retard the oxidation of these oils once consumed.
 

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I think it's good to stay away from fats and oils period. I think you need a little for your metabolism; but I'm a strong advocate for the Dean Ornish (heart surgeon) diet of retstricting your total calorie intake of fats/oils to something like 5%? I heard a study on NPR about deep fat fryers and how the more the fat gets reheated, (like each time you cook with it), the more your body produces these stroke promoting hormones. The arteries and capillary blood vessles shrink incredibly! If you deep fat fry at home its fairly safe, but when you eat at say McDonalds the fat gets reheated many times and is much worse for you.
 

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I even heard Dean Ornish speak on NPR one time. He said DOGS eat better than us. I'm glad you said ancestors, because he brought that up. Our caveman type ancestors had very little fat in their diet because it was so scarce. Wild animals were/are very lean and to get vegetable oils you had to eat a lot of vegetables (now its so easy, just buy it by the gallon all concentrated). Ornish says that our bodies crave it because it's scarce and it forces us to go search it out. It backfires in modern society where it's so easy to get because of technology and since our ancestor-like tongues are craving it, we go way overboard. I've cut out a lot of oil/fat in my diet, and your body gets used to it. If you're not used to eating a low fat diet, it tastes awful at first, but after a while the food tastes good low in fat, and actually high fat food just sits in my stomach and I have a hard time digesting it (dysbiosis?).
 

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I agree that all IBSers should avoid all oils. I'm following a diet prescribed in the book Eating for IBS by Heather VanVorous and it says to avoid all fats (fried foods, large amounts of oil, red meat, etc.) and dairy, which are all powerful intestinal triggers for our sensitive tummies. I see a lot of people here using olive oil and cringe at the results of that meal will be for that person. However, I know each one of us is different. I use small amounts of canola oil (less than a tablespoon for the entire meal) in most of the recipes that I make, if necessary. Otherwise, I use Pam Olive Oil spray to stir fry foods. I log my foods on www.fitday.com and have consistently kept my fats to 10-12 percent of my diet consistently. Once I started doing that, my symptoms lessened immensely. I didn't eat fried foods that often nor did I consume dairy, but did a lot of oils because I read that the 'good ones' were healthy for me. Not so in my case. I've also started taking a fiber supplement (Citrucel: 2 capsules 4x/day) and have stopped eating raw fruits and veggies which are also triggers and irritants to the digestive track in raw form. I do a lot of soups and veggie stir frys and have done well. The diet is based on including soluable fiber as the basis of each meal, and to not eat anything but soluable fiber on an empty tummy. Also, keep it low fat. I swear it works!The complex carbs (oatmeal, cornmeal, pasta, potatos, rice, etc.) are filling and I have not gained any weight on this high-carb diet (at least 60-70 percent carbs).Check out www.eatingforibs.com and www.firstyearibs.comHope this helps someone!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jules...has made an interesting point when she said, "each of us is different". I am a person who can tolerate very high levels of fat in my diet without all the problems that heather talks about. My triggers are carbs which is why i avoid heather's advice like the plague. however, now that i am recovering i can consume much larger quantities of carbs, but i still can not touch any grain whatsoever. they still cause violent reactions and not just in my intestines but all over (like brain fog).some of our ancestors subsisted on high degrees of fat. tribal groups that lived near northern coasts are an example.so once again, it depends on the individual. the best book on diet and foods that i have ever read is by a dr Peter d'adamo and his blood typing books (his first book is not as good as his follow up book). i am blood type "O" and he recommends lower carb intake and higher fat intake. the "A" type is more of a carb eater.i need to get about 30% of my calories from fat. this is how i function best. for a while i was getting 50 to 60% of my calories from fat and yet i had no cramping at all, but as i improved (due to various treatments) i was able to include more carbs which allowed for more bulk/fiber in my diet.
 
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