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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been on a fat free diet for over a year and a half. Since then I have had very few reactions, and all have been minor. Traveling is very difficult, eating in restaurants is tough, but my health is much better. Any one try this? Before my diet I had times when I could eat some fat, but I never knew when I would hit the crucial limit. Once my bowels were exposed to fat they would stay sensitive for days. So additional fat would tip the balance. It's radical, but has worked for me.
 

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Hi there,Everyone needs some fat in their diet for many reasons. Olive oil and oil from salmon, for example, are 'good fats' in that they lower blood cholesteral (sp?) levels. Fat should never be cut out completely.Lisa
 

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Hi there,Everyone needs some fat in their diet for many reasons. Olive oil and oil from salmon, for example, are 'good fats' in that they lower blood cholesteral (sp?) levels. Fat should never be cut out completely.Lisa
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's true that there are good fats. That doesn't mean everyone can actually EAT those fats. Olive oil is NOT good for me. I probably eat the equivalent of 5-10% recommended daily fat each day, because it's hard to totally avoid fat (my favorite cereals have 2% daily fat, for example). I can occasionally eat salmon poached in water, and shrimp is not a problem. There are ways to get the right nutrition without eating fat. I found I can tolerate more complex foods as I removed the fat. I'm not saying this is an easy diet! Fat tastes good and it is everywhere. Traveling has become a real problem. But I sure like being healthy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's true that there are good fats. That doesn't mean everyone can actually EAT those fats. Olive oil is NOT good for me. I probably eat the equivalent of 5-10% recommended daily fat each day, because it's hard to totally avoid fat (my favorite cereals have 2% daily fat, for example). I can occasionally eat salmon poached in water, and shrimp is not a problem. There are ways to get the right nutrition without eating fat. I found I can tolerate more complex foods as I removed the fat. I'm not saying this is an easy diet! Fat tastes good and it is everywhere. Traveling has become a real problem. But I sure like being healthy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
cynthia, I am inclined to agree with what LisaL said, that we all need some sort of fat (the 'good' fats) in our diets.I am curious, what are your other daily sources of fat...do you eat peanut butter? Or eggs? And when you say you enjoy being 'healthy', what does that mean? Do you have normal BMs? Have you had any adverse reactions to having too little fat in your diet?
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
cynthia, I am inclined to agree with what LisaL said, that we all need some sort of fat (the 'good' fats) in our diets.I am curious, what are your other daily sources of fat...do you eat peanut butter? Or eggs? And when you say you enjoy being 'healthy', what does that mean? Do you have normal BMs? Have you had any adverse reactions to having too little fat in your diet?
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi tamz. I roughly follow a diet recommended in a cookbook, "The New McDougall Cookbook". It's a ultra low-fat, vegetarian diet. I do eat fish sometimes, but not often. I don't eat any fats except what may occur in low-fat foods, such as whole-wheat pasta. No peanut butter (boohoo) or eggs or anything tasty. It's a tough diet and not for everyone. I have gone down three sizes, but my weight has stablized now. I might lose a bit more but it is very slow. I have normal BM's, unless something creeps into my diet, like the time I had some delicious homemade bread. I became suspicious since it tastes *so* good so asked for the receipe. "Lard" said the cook. Ugh! Then I have my old D reaction, which is what used to happen regularly. My doctor says I'm healthy and I eat lots of veggies, whole grain breads, pasta and rice, fruits and fat-free frozen fudge bars (yum). But like I said, eating out is very hard. We stayed at a nice place in Maine where the meals were included. I sent the cook a copy of the McDougall cookbook and he actually made special meals for me all week. But it made me nervous. What if he forgot and there was too much butter or oil? It was hard to enjoy the great food, though it was a treat. I can eat lobster, by the way. Just don't dip it in butter. Had to eat lobster in Maine!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi tamz. I roughly follow a diet recommended in a cookbook, "The New McDougall Cookbook". It's a ultra low-fat, vegetarian diet. I do eat fish sometimes, but not often. I don't eat any fats except what may occur in low-fat foods, such as whole-wheat pasta. No peanut butter (boohoo) or eggs or anything tasty. It's a tough diet and not for everyone. I have gone down three sizes, but my weight has stablized now. I might lose a bit more but it is very slow. I have normal BM's, unless something creeps into my diet, like the time I had some delicious homemade bread. I became suspicious since it tastes *so* good so asked for the receipe. "Lard" said the cook. Ugh! Then I have my old D reaction, which is what used to happen regularly. My doctor says I'm healthy and I eat lots of veggies, whole grain breads, pasta and rice, fruits and fat-free frozen fudge bars (yum). But like I said, eating out is very hard. We stayed at a nice place in Maine where the meals were included. I sent the cook a copy of the McDougall cookbook and he actually made special meals for me all week. But it made me nervous. What if he forgot and there was too much butter or oil? It was hard to enjoy the great food, though it was a treat. I can eat lobster, by the way. Just don't dip it in butter. Had to eat lobster in Maine!
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
cynthia, I am somewhat familiar with the McDougall plan. I visit www.vegsource.com a lot and they have a section for it. I am a vegetarian, almost vegan because I don't eat dairy products at all. I did read a book by Dr. Dean Ornish that I believe is very similar to the McDougall plan. You mentioned that you eat lots of fruits and veggies...and I am assuming that does not aggravate your IBS? Lucky you! I used to be able to eat lots of fruits and veggies and be just fine, but now it seems like certain varieties give me awful D symptoms!
I know what you mean about being nervous when other people cook you food. My friend made some awesome cookies that made me extremely naseous. Then I remembered her saying they had butter flavored Crisco in them!! It is somewhat strange that we can't eat #### anymore, our bodies just reject it! In fact, I had a baked potatoe from Wendy's for lunch yesterday. I put butter on it, because I didn't think it was a big deal. Well, I had D the rest of the day and evening...and I'm wondering if the butter is to blame?!?
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
cynthia, I am somewhat familiar with the McDougall plan. I visit www.vegsource.com a lot and they have a section for it. I am a vegetarian, almost vegan because I don't eat dairy products at all. I did read a book by Dr. Dean Ornish that I believe is very similar to the McDougall plan. You mentioned that you eat lots of fruits and veggies...and I am assuming that does not aggravate your IBS? Lucky you! I used to be able to eat lots of fruits and veggies and be just fine, but now it seems like certain varieties give me awful D symptoms!
I know what you mean about being nervous when other people cook you food. My friend made some awesome cookies that made me extremely naseous. Then I remembered her saying they had butter flavored Crisco in them!! It is somewhat strange that we can't eat #### anymore, our bodies just reject it! In fact, I had a baked potatoe from Wendy's for lunch yesterday. I put butter on it, because I didn't think it was a big deal. Well, I had D the rest of the day and evening...and I'm wondering if the butter is to blame?!?
 

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Hi Cynthia - I have to agree with you. When I was on a very strict diet (rice and veggies) my BM's were normal after one month and I was the healthiest I have ever been. Of course dealing with eating only rice and veggies was nearly impossible to keep up with and I fell off the truck so to speak. After reading your post, I am seriously considering it again. I will be checking out that cookbook.Congrats to you!s
 

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Hi Cynthia - I have to agree with you. When I was on a very strict diet (rice and veggies) my BM's were normal after one month and I was the healthiest I have ever been. Of course dealing with eating only rice and veggies was nearly impossible to keep up with and I fell off the truck so to speak. After reading your post, I am seriously considering it again. I will be checking out that cookbook.Congrats to you!s
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi Tamz. I have problems with fruit that has a lot of roughage, like oranges or grapefruit. Bananas, strawberries, peaches, etc are fine. But I noticed blackberries have too many seeds for me. Some veggies are a problem, like tomato sauce (raw tomatoes are fine), cukes, broccoli, burpy stuff. The cookbook stresses beans and I haven't been able to embrace them. Hi LisaL. No, I'm not trying to get pregnant. We have two great kids, both adopted. So I'm not worried about pregnancy. Can you explain your question about organs?sarren, interesting that you tried a non-fat diet. I found it really tough in the beginning because it meant I was cooking one set of foods for me, one for the kids and one in between for my husband. Now we come to a middle ground, where everyone generally eats less fat, but they eat cheese, yogurt, pizza, butter etc, but not every night and I eat stuff plain. I might make pasta, tomato sauce, corn, french bread, and cut up melon for dinner, but I will eat plain pasta with a veggie that I can eat (not corn), no sauce, no cheese, a fat-free dressing on the pasta and I can eat the bread, but with no butter. My son will eat pasta, sauce, cheese, bread, butter, melon, corn. My daughter will eat pasta, no sauce, maybe cheese on the side, corn, bread, no melon (but she has already eaten a meals's worth of food when she got home because she is too excited to eat at school. She's tall and thin, and always moving...), and my husband, well, you get the idea, everyone eats what works for them from the pool of food I present. This diet can be boring, but I'm not tempted to slip anymore. I hated getting sick. I discovered I can eat spices like ginger, horseradish and mustard, so I use those on my foods. My taste buds have definitely changed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi Tamz. I have problems with fruit that has a lot of roughage, like oranges or grapefruit. Bananas, strawberries, peaches, etc are fine. But I noticed blackberries have too many seeds for me. Some veggies are a problem, like tomato sauce (raw tomatoes are fine), cukes, broccoli, burpy stuff. The cookbook stresses beans and I haven't been able to embrace them. Hi LisaL. No, I'm not trying to get pregnant. We have two great kids, both adopted. So I'm not worried about pregnancy. Can you explain your question about organs?sarren, interesting that you tried a non-fat diet. I found it really tough in the beginning because it meant I was cooking one set of foods for me, one for the kids and one in between for my husband. Now we come to a middle ground, where everyone generally eats less fat, but they eat cheese, yogurt, pizza, butter etc, but not every night and I eat stuff plain. I might make pasta, tomato sauce, corn, french bread, and cut up melon for dinner, but I will eat plain pasta with a veggie that I can eat (not corn), no sauce, no cheese, a fat-free dressing on the pasta and I can eat the bread, but with no butter. My son will eat pasta, sauce, cheese, bread, butter, melon, corn. My daughter will eat pasta, no sauce, maybe cheese on the side, corn, bread, no melon (but she has already eaten a meals's worth of food when she got home because she is too excited to eat at school. She's tall and thin, and always moving...), and my husband, well, you get the idea, everyone eats what works for them from the pool of food I present. This diet can be boring, but I'm not tempted to slip anymore. I hated getting sick. I discovered I can eat spices like ginger, horseradish and mustard, so I use those on my foods. My taste buds have definitely changed.
 

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Hi,Below is just a bit of info. I know you said your kids eat butter and cheese, but no kids should have their intake of fat restricted too much.Why Do We Need Fat In Our Diet?Essential fatty acids are found mainly in plant sources. They must be eaten because the body cannot make them. These fatty acids are converted into substances very important to the regulation of many body processes, including normal cell growth and activity and proper nerve function. The substance made from the essential fatty acids are also important in maintaining hormonal balance, for immune response and resistance to disease, in lowering blood pressure, in decreasing clumping of blood cells, and for lowering of blood cholesterol.Too little fat may result in caloric deficiency, dry skin, decreased resistance to disease, irregular or lack of menses, muscle wasting and retarded growth in young children.My comment about the vital organs is that fat protects them (grade school science). I am in great shape and have a lower fat diet, but it is unhealthy to restrict it entirely (or almost entirely).Lisa
 

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Hi,Below is just a bit of info. I know you said your kids eat butter and cheese, but no kids should have their intake of fat restricted too much.Why Do We Need Fat In Our Diet?Essential fatty acids are found mainly in plant sources. They must be eaten because the body cannot make them. These fatty acids are converted into substances very important to the regulation of many body processes, including normal cell growth and activity and proper nerve function. The substance made from the essential fatty acids are also important in maintaining hormonal balance, for immune response and resistance to disease, in lowering blood pressure, in decreasing clumping of blood cells, and for lowering of blood cholesterol.Too little fat may result in caloric deficiency, dry skin, decreased resistance to disease, irregular or lack of menses, muscle wasting and retarded growth in young children.My comment about the vital organs is that fat protects them (grade school science). I am in great shape and have a lower fat diet, but it is unhealthy to restrict it entirely (or almost entirely).Lisa
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Cynthia,I'm glad this way of eating is working for you. I'm almost willing to try anything at this point, but going low/no fat for me would make me put ON weight... I'm one of the carb-sensitive folk who seem to be able to eat a lot of fat, and not gain weight. But put some sugar, starches, or other carbs in my mouth (like all the pasta, rice and veggies you eat), and I'd balloon right up. This is why I get so frustrated! If the fat intake is irritating my bowel/colon, then the trade-off is to gain weight? NO!!! I'm still trying to rid my body of the last 20lbs of 'baby' fat from pregnancy, and my 'baby' is now 6... I guess nothing works for everyone, but it can be so darn frustrating to weed thru all the 'quick fixes' out there!Tired
 
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