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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_..._v21/ai_4790738 Quote:The most common cause of intestinalgas is swallowing air. Indeed, most of the gas inside us is composed of oxygen and nitrogen. Swallowing air is hard to avoid--a little goes down with each mouthful of food. Eating too fast can increase air intake. Ill-fitting dentures and chewing gum are other sources of air swallowing.Other intestinal gasses include hydrogen,carbon dioxide and methane. They are produced in the large intestine when undigested food is fermented by bacteria that live in the colon. This is known as colonic fermentation.Those five gasses are odorless andconstitute about 99 percent of all intestinal gas. The foul odor associated with flatus comes from trace amounts of other gasses that result from the fermentation process. Some of these trace gasses can be detected by smell in concentrations as low as one part per 100 million.The amount of gas a person takesin and produces varies from individual to individual (from about 400 to 2,400 cubic centimeters a day). The amounts differ because people are different: Some swallow more air than others, and some produce more gas than others. (Methane production, for example, seems to run in families, with only about 30 percent of the population producing it.)However, it may not be the amountof gas that causes stomach and social discomfort but the movement of the gas. Researchers have found that the complaint of "too much gas" often results from slow transit time through the digestive tract, rather than excessive volume.The gas eruptions also vary from individualto individual. People who swallow more air and indulge in beer or soft drinks (which contain carbon dioxide) may be well-known belchers. Foods that get into the colon in an undigested state and are fermented there by bacteria result more in flatus production.There seems to be some minor disagreementover the number of daily flatus incidents that is considered normal. One publication reported 13 as average, while another said 14. It is interesting, however, that neither cited a reference.Internal production of gas is probablybest limited by diet. Lactose-intolerant people, for example, need to avoid milk and most milk products in order to escape discomfort and embarassment. (See "Sweet Milk and Sour Stomachs" in the March 1984 FDA Consumer.) In one study, the number of flatus episodes in one lactose-intolerant individual increased from 34 to 141 a day with a pure milk diet. The accompanying box lists other foods that get the bacteria working in the colon. Of course, beans head the list.The two Navy researchers, Dr. MichaelM. Van Ness and Dr. Edward L. Cattau Jr., of the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., in their American Family Physician article, reveiwed other methods of controlling gas output, including use of antibiotics and other drugs. They concluded that "the treatment of the patient with excessive flatulence remains a challenge." However, they added that "diet modification ... is prudent and worth a therapeutic trial.The first time an advisory panel ofexperts reviewed anti-gas products for FDA was in 1973. It concluded that there weren't enough studies to prove any drug ingredient both safe and effective.FDA disagreed with its panel, concludingthat one ingredient--simethicone--was safe and effective for relief of flatulence and gas.Yet, a subsequent report by anotherpanel of experts--the one issued in 1982--again found that no ingredient had been proven safe and effective in treating gas and flatulence. The panel called for more study on the following ingredients: cellulase and hemicellulase, charcoal, homatropine methylbromide, magnesium hydroxide, pancreatin and pancrelipase, simethicone, sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate.However, the agency has yet to respondto the 1982 report. It remains to be seen if the agency, when it does respond, will stay with its position that simethicone is safe and effective.FDA is to determine whether thatlatest panel report will change its previous viewpoint about simethicone.One expert who doubts the value ofsimethicone is the author of the NIH fact sheet on gas, Dr. Harris R. Clearfield, professor of medicine at Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital in Philadelphia. He says simethicone "has an anti-gas effect in test tubes ... [but] does not seem to relieve the symptoms of gas in most people."The digestive aids panel did throwout a number of ingredients as generally safe, but not effective. These ingredients included such folk remedies as ox bile, dehydrated garlic, and blessed thistle plant, plus the roots and lower stems of golden seal.Relieving gas in a socially acceptablemanner may remain elusive to many people. To them, the best advice seems: Watch your diet, eat more slowly, chew your food well, and relax, since some researchers believe that stress may contribute to that gassy feeling.COPYRIGHT 1987 U.S. Government Printing OfficeCOPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Micheal Lewitt:What a gas - flatulence http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_...v16/ai_16720832 Quote..."When you analyze rectal gas," Levitt says, "you find that it is about 99 percent carbon dioxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and methane. Most of these gases are either swallowed inadvertently when food is eaten or released from the food as it is digested. What makes this remarkable to most people is not just that these gases are so common but that they are also utterly odorless."...Second quote:" :"Flatulence is characterized by an overproduction of a wide range of gases, including hydrogen," he says. "Not all of the gas generated in the intestines is excreted, however; some of it is absorbed by the blood and exhaled through the lungs. If you can measure the level of excess hydrogen in a patient's breath, therefore, you can diagnose a flatulence problem and perhaps help reverse it."
 

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Fedotozine is about to be released..ten years ago. This article was written April 1987In 2005
quote:The most common cause of intestinalgas is swallowing air.
We think it's mostly carbon dioxide and hydrogen.
quote:(from about 400 to 2,400 cubic centimeters a day)
we think, from my recollection, it's about 400 to 1,500, but that's on a diet that includes beans. Without them, the volume be substantially lower.
quote: Lactose-intolerant people, for example, need to avoid milk and most milk products in order to escape discomfort
they don't need to avoid it. Consuming it dietary amounts does not produce appreciable symptoms.
quote:the number of flatus episodes in one lactose-intolerant individual increased from 34 to 141 a day with a pure milk diet.
This is just poor reporting. The individual had a problem unrelated to lactose intolerance that caused him to have a lot of gas.
quote: One expert who doubts the value ofsimethicone
Still accurate. Products like Gas-X really are useless.
 

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quote:Second quote:" :"Flatulence is characterized by an overproduction of a wide range of gases, including hydrogen," he says. "Not all of the gas generated in the intestines is excreted, however; some of it is absorbed by the blood and exhaled through the lungs. If you can measure the level of excess hydrogen in a patient's breath, therefore, you can diagnose a flatulence problem and perhaps help reverse it."
Not sure what the
is about,spasman? It is not as if your breath smells of flatulence. Hydrogen is odorless.
 

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The only exception is when we eat garlic."Q. Why does our breath smell like garlic days after we've eaten it, no matter how many times we brush our teeth?T.A.S.Concord A. Eau de garlic emanates not from our mouths but from our lungs, long after we've eaten the pungent herb and brushed our teeth for the 15th time.Dr. Michael Levitt, chief of research at the Minneapolis Veterans' Administration Hospital, says he discovered garlic's sneaky way around our toothbrushes and mouthwash when he developed the standard test for lactose intolerance. That's the inability of some people's digestive systems to break down the sugar, called lactose, that is common in dairy products.Most people have an enzyme, lactase, that breaks down that particular sugar. In folks who don't, the lactose is broken down instead by bacteria that live in our digestive system. The byproduct of that is hydrogen gas. Some of the hydrogen is emitted as flatus. Some of it makes its way out on our breath.Levitt's test measures the baseline hydrogen content of a patient's breath before ingesting dairy foods. If the hydrogen in the breath goes up after a glass of milk, it confirms lactose intolerance.``If intestinal gas can get into your blood and breath, why doesn't your breath doesn't smell the way flatulence does?'' Dr. Levitt asks rhetorically. He explains that of the various gases in flatus, the tiny percentage that are offensive (less than 1 percent) are all sulfur-based.``They are all poisons if they get into the blood,'' Levitt says. ``Hydrogen sulfide is one. It's as poisonous as cyanide.''If those gases got into the bloodstream, you can imagine the results. So the lining of the intestines has evolved the ability to metabolize those dangerous sulfurs out of the gas that diffuses into the blood. Only the safe, non-smelly gasses like hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen can get through to our blood, lungs, and ultimately our breath.But then there's garlic. It contains a unique sulfur compound, allyl methyl sulfide. The body doesn't metabolize it as it diffuses through the intestinal lining.``It's apparently non-toxic,'' Levitt says. ``This particular sulfur compound can get into the blood stream and up into the lungs. That's why we still have garlic breath hours and days after we've eaten it.''"from http://www.boston.com/globe/search/stories..._why/030199.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:"Dr. Levitt asks rhetorically. He explains that of the various gases in flatus, the tiny percentage that are offensive (less than 1 percent) are all sulfur-based.``They are all poisons if they get into the blood,'' Levitt says. ``Hydrogen sulfide is one. It's as poisonous as cyanide.''-Wow Bonnei,that should explain why people get pain everywhere in their body.Even fybromyalgia.Cyanide in the muscles,bones,mouth,lungs...That hurt!!!
The
was because i'm impress about this quote: "If you can measure the level of excess hydrogen in a patient's breath, therefore, you can diagnose a flatulence problem and perhaps help reverse it." It's brilliant to analize the gas,that should be in ALL G.I. department.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Flux Quote:"we think, from my recollection, it's about 400 to 1,500, but that's on a diet that includes beans. Without them, the volume be substantially lower."Recollection?You have been "recollected" at his office?You are in the normal range now?How?Flux,there is no threat here.Tell us your story or send me an e-mail.
Make your "coming out"
 

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Spasman about gases being poisonous in the body, "So the lining of the intestines has evolved the ability to metabolize those dangerous sulfurs out of the gas that diffuses into the blood. Only the safe, non-smelly gasses like hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen can get through to our blood, lungs, and ultimately our breath."Recollect does not mean re-collect or collect again. It means to recall or remember
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Gas diffused from the bowel in the body whatever what they are,in IBSers,are probably the cause of the endless list of symptoms associated with the syndrom.BTW,i have something for Flux(saliva does play a role): http://www.soilandhealth.org/02/0201hyglib...Moser02ch2.html Quote:"Horace Fletcher, whose name has become synonymous with the importance of chewing food well (Fletcherizing), ran an experiment on a military population in Canada. He required half his experimental group to chew thoroughly, and the other half to gulp things down as usual,. His study reports significant improvement in the overall health and performance of the group that persistently chewed. Fletcher's report recommended that every mouthful be chewed 50 times for half a minute before being swallowed. Try it, you might be very surprised at what a beneficial effect such a simple change in your approach to eating can make. Not only will you have less intestinal gas, if overweight you will probably find yourself getting smaller because your blood sugar will elevate quicker as you are eating and thus your sense of hunger will go away sooner. If you are very thin and have difficulty gaining weight you may find that the pounds go on easier because chewing well makes your body more capable of actually assimilating the calories you are consuming."...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
HI Bonnei,i have found my clinic here for the breath test.I will contact them. :love: The weird thing is that most fructose malabsorbers have D apparently.That's what the Iowa nurse told me.I don't really beleive her.
 

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I think you either would have D or be alternating. It just depends on the volume of fructose you intake. I think you said grape juice helps you have motions. If you had juice in excesss of the amount you could absorb you would get D ir soft stools. Perhaps you don't have that much juice. Try drinking 4-5 glasses of juice for three days and see what happens. Are you going to do the fructose intolerance breath test?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In the past,i had D sometimes with fruit juice.But now C is there with trapped wind.Even the fruit juice don't do much.Yes,i will contact Mcgill in Mtl.2 hours from here.
I will save near 1000$ if they offer it free rather than do the home test from the Iowa U.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have also hope on Talnetant(clinical trial) to reduce this fu****g sensitivity in my lower bowel and modulate the motility.Zelnorm figth the C well but it make me more irritable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hey Bonnei the top researcher from Mcgill
university is DEATH!
CBC news (2002): http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2002/08/13/mishkin020813 Death of McGill doctor highlights cancer cluster studies Last Updated Tue, 13 Aug 2002 14:28:28 MONTREAL - A doctor who died last week of leukemia claimed he became ill because of poor ventilation in a building he worked in for years at McGill University in Montreal. Dr. Barry Mishkin was 34 years old. Benzene is used to manufacture synthetic rubber Michkin believed the years he spent working and studying in a medical building were the cause of his acute lymphacytic leukemia, which was diagnosed in March, 1999. Two other doctors who worked in the lab during the 1990s now have leukemia. They all claim they were exposed to dangerous levels of benzene, a chemical known to cause leukemia in humans. Lawyer Gordon Kuglar is suing McGill on behalf of Mishkin. The university hasn't responded, except for a statement to the media saying there's no evidence linking Mishkin's leukemia with the time he spent in the anatomy building. Causal link difficult to establish Dr. Louis Drouin of Montreal Public Health's Occupational and Environmental Health Unit has examined other recent clusters of suspected cancer cases in the province: At Montreal's Ste-Justine hospital, 18 lab technicians developed cancer. Public health officials tested air quality and checked for potential hazards in the building. There was no proof of cause and effect. In Ste-Hyacinthe, five people at a vocational school developed kidney cancer. Again, no link was established between the cancers and the building's environment. In "most of these cancer cluster investigations, we cannot have any resolution of the problem," said Drouin. A 22-year study of cancer cluster investigations by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control found no causal links. Drouin said the Canadian experience is the same. "When you have two or three people in a small building or a school or a hospital and try to link with a specific occupational exposure which has been 22 years ago, the number is so small," said Drouin. "It can be by chance, it can be real but with the statistical tools we have they cannot conclude." It will take months � if not years � to establish whether Mishkin lost his life as a result of the dangers in the the place he once worked.
Tragic.Even his lab partner has leukemia
Well,i'm not sure i would be able to be breath tested at Mcgill.
He died at 34 years old,what a loss!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The article on Natural gas was release just after his death.I think his brothers was also researchers as i can see in the article.Do you know what means "the canadian journal of CME" in the article?I'm trying to find which departments works on breath test there.I think we can say that he was our M.Lewitt.He was influenced by him in his research. :love:
 

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http://www.stacommunications.com/journals/index.html The Canadian Journal of Continuing Medical Education is directly affiliated with Canada's major universities and their medical faculties. Each month its articles are drawn from a different medical school's CME program. Its audience includes general and family practitioners, as well as most clinical specialists. Its objective is to inform readers about the latest advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment modalities.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Poor ventilation and occupational exposure to hazards is found in every type of job, not just universities. Although people tend to assume universities know better they are just as prone to all the various issues that any workplace has (sometimes more so depending on how committed the university is to keeping very old buildings in service as they can be hard to retrofit to modern standards).K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Flux,i knew it was from 87,i was just testing you.
BTW,i don't think you are able to find a newer FDA article on gas.
Thanks K.
 
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