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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
For me this is almost an everyday occurance. I don't know why it happens - maybe too much greasy foods? I know that women float in hot tubs because their fat content is higher than men.
 

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The only possible cause of this is gas in the stool. Eating greasy food or too much fat in the stool (something that is abnormal and not present in IBS) cannot cause this.[This message has been edited by flux (edited 07-12-2000).]
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You should talk to my hubby!!
He knows all about Floaties
Pellets
Pasty poops
We have a whole list of them
Enjoy the adventure
My thoughts and prayers are with you all.
 

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A doctor wrote in a local newspaper column that everyones poop should float. This is when they are getting the proper amount of fibre in their diets. Not sure about it but it was a reason.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have floating stools when I take my metemucil. If I don't take my metemucil, I noticed that my stools don't float. So I am thinking it may be from the gas inside me, Metemucil does give me gas.
 

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Caca is correct about the floating stools. Normal and health stools should float - it means there is enough fiber in the diet.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well if that is case with floating stools and fiber, and mine do not float when I do not take metemucil, guess I must not be getting enough fiber. Thanks for the info.
 

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quote:Caca is correct about the floating stools. Normal and health stools should float - it means there is enough fiber in the diet
There is no specific medical rule (if there is such a thing) that stools should float. Since only gas in the stool can make it float the only way consuming fiber could do this is the person makes enough gas from it. However, gas production is variable and some people make very little.
 

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I am familiar with the floating stool phenomenon attributable to the consumption of psyllium. It happens to me consistently. It may be possible that psyllium makes stools float for some people because of gases. More likely it is attributable to the fact that when psyllium mixes with water it becomes a mucilage. It is the protein in the mucilage that would make it float. As an indelicate example, if you coughed up phlegm and spit it into water it would float-but not because of gases. The mucoproteins in phlegm make it float because the proteins are lighter that the water.
 

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quote:More likely it is attributable to the fact that when psyllium mixes with water it becomes a mucilage. It is the protein in the mucilage that would make it float.
One would have to consume probably very large volumes of fiber to do this, and the standard doses are very tiny. So I would go with the gas as the cause. However, one counterpoint to this idea is that fiber doesn't seem to cause much gas when taken in standard amounts (at least not that anyone can find.)
 

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PsylliumII. Uses:psyllium is produced mainly for its mucilage content, which is highest in P. ovata. Mucilage describes a group of clear, colorless, gelling agents derived from plants. The mucilage obtained from psyllium comes from the seed coat. Mucilage is obtained by mechanical milling/grinding of the outer layer of the seed. Mucilage yield amounts to approximately 25% or more (by weight) of the total seed yield. Plantago seed mucilage is often referred to as husk or psyllium husk. The milled seed mucilage is a white fibrous material that is hydrophilic (water-loving). Upon absorbing water the clear colorless mucilaginous gel that forms increases in volume by ten-fold or more. Psyllium is mainly used as a dietary fiber, which is not digested by action in the small intestine. The purely mechanical action of psyllium mucilage absorbs excess water while stimulating normal bowel elimination. Although its main use has been as a laxative, it is more appropriately termed a true dietary fiber.The United States is the world's largest importer of psyllium "husk" with over 60% of total imports going to pharmaceutical firms for use in products such as "Metamucil", "Effersyllium" and "Fiberall". Psyllium mucilage is also used as a natural dietary fiber for animals. The dehusked seed that remains after the seed coat is milled off is rich in starch and fatty acids and is used in India as chicken feed and as cattle feed.Psyllium mucilage possesses several other desirable properties. As a thickener, it has been used in ice cream and frozen deserts. A 1.5% weight/volume ratio of psyllium mucilage exhibits binding properties that are superior to a 10% weight/volume ratio of starch mucilage. The viscosity of psyllium mucilage dispersions are relatively unaffected between temperatures of 68 to 122�F, by pH from 2 to 10 and by salt (sodium chloride) concentrations up to 0.15 M. These properties in combination with psyllium's natural fiber characteristic may lead to increased use by the food processing industry. Technical grade psyllium has been used as a hydrocolloidal agent to improve water retention for newly seeded grass areas and to improve transplanting success with woody plants. VIII. Information Sources:* Abraham, Z.D. and T. Mehta. 1988. Three-week psyllium husk supplementation: Effect on plasma cholesterol concentrations, fecal steroid excretion, and carbohydrate absorption in men. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 47(1):67-74.* Anderson, J.R., K. Bukhave, L. Hojgaard, J. Rasmussen, N. Hermansen, H. Worning and E. Krag 1988. Decomposition of wheat bran and isabgol husk in the stomach and small intestine of healthy men. J. Nutr. 118(3):326-331.* Anderson, J.W., D. Deakins, T. Floore, B. Smith, S. Whitis. 1990. Dietary fiber and coronary heart disease. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 29(2):95-147.* Bell, L.P., K. Hectorn, H. Reynolds, D. Hunninghake. 1990. Cholesterol-lowering effects of soluble-fiber cereals as part of a prudent diet for patients with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 52(6):1020-1026.* Bhagat, N.R. 1980. Studies on variation and association among seed yield and some component traits in Plantago ovata Forsk. Crop Improv. 7:60-63.* Chan, J.K.C. and V. Wypyszyk. 1988. A forgotten natural dietary fiber: psyllium mucilloid. Cereal Foods World 33(11):919-922.* Chastagner, G.A., J. Ogawa, K. Sammeta. 1978. Cause and control of damping off of Plantago ovata. Plant Disease Reporter 62:929-932.* Costa, M.A., T. Mehta, J. Males. 1989. Effects of dietary cellulose, psyllium husk and cholesterol level on fecal and colonic microbial metabolism in monkeys. J. Nutr. 119(7):986- 992.* Czarnecki, M. and L. Golez. 1987. Influence of mineral fertilization on yield and nutrient absorption in Plantago psyllium L. Herba Pol 31(3/4):167-174.* Gupta, R. 1982. Recent advances in cultivation of Isabgol (Plantago ovata Forsk.) in India. In Cultivation and Utilization of Medicinal Plants. C.K. Atal and B.M. Kapar eds. Pages 406- 417.* Lantner, R.R., B. Espiritu, P. Zumerchik, M. Tobin. 1990. Anaphylaxis following ingestion of a psyllium-containing cereal. J.A.M.A.J. Am. Med. Assoc. 264(19):2534-2536.* Liebman, B. 1988. The laxative that lowers cholesterol. Nutr. Action Health Letter 15(9):9. * Mathur, D.P., B. Rangarajan, V. Gupta. 1990. Psyllium production and marketing in India. New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Pub. Co. 167 pp.* McNeil, D.L. 1989. Factors affecting the field establishment of Plantago ovata Forsk. in northern Australia. Trop. Agric. 66(1):61-64.* Mehta, K.G., J. Modi, R. Gupta. 1976. Psyllium. Indian J. Agron. 21(4):509-510.* Modi, S.M., K. Mehta, and R. Gupta. 1974. Isabgol, a dollar earner of North Gujarat. Indian Farming 23(10):17-19.* Psyasyatskene, A.A. and Y. Vaichyunene. 1987. Plantains in the Lithuanian S.S.R.: Specific growth of local species and species being introduced and mucilage localization in their organs. I. in Russian: Abstract in English in Hort Abstracts.* Rubis, D.D. 1990. Personal communique in regard to Plantago and psyllium.* Russell, T.E. 1975. Plantago wilt. Phytopathology 65:359-360.* Samra, J.S. and B. Gill. 1986. Seed yield of Isabgol as influenced by doses and sources of nitrogen. J. Res. Punjab Agric. Univ. 23(4):557-560.* Stewart, R.B., W. Jale, M. Moore, F. May, R. Marks. 1991. Effect of psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid on serum cholesterol in the elderly. Dig. Dis. Sci. 36(3):329-334.* The Herb Market Report. 1990. anon. 6(1).* Wolever, T.M.S., V. Vuksan, H. Eshuis, P. Spafadora, R. Peterson, E. Chao, M. Storey, and D. Jenkins. 1991. Effect of method of administration of psyllium on glycemic response and carbohydrate digestibility. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 10(4):364-371.------------------------------------------------------------------------Last updated: Wed Jan 26 19:14:51 CDT 2000 by aw
 

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Should that have told us anything relevant to the relationship between floating stools and psyllium?
 

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I was told that floating stools is caused by gas.Also, I was told that "normal" stool/the "ideal" stool should break up when hitting the water. Fiber is said to help achieve "the normal stool" If this is not happening with the fiber then you need to try a different type of fiber and/or consume more water with it.Some fibers do cause more gas in some people -- this usually goes away after your body adjusts to it but the water is very important with it. Most people don't consume enough water anyway and when taking fiber supplements you need even more water.
 

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The "perfect" B.M. is totally tubular and the diameter of a quarter....so sayeth a gastroenterologist with whom I'm familiar!
 
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