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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
»Bloating is worst if you have more gas.That's pretty simple.Add fiber supplements and you WILL INCREASE BLOATING AND GAS.High amount of gas is usually caused by some food.One simple fact,even in normal subject,bloating is associated with a fullness sensation.So this fullness is symptomatic in C-type because of the motility disorder.If you are C-type then bloating and gas usually rules your life.Conclusion:Excessive bloating is caused by increase in gas in correllation with stagnation.AMEN.Spasman 2006 LOL
 

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Bloating can also be due to other things.It may be gas for you, but that doesn't mean it is the only thing that is true for every other person on the planet.If the bloating goes away when you eventually fart, it may in fact be due to gas. Gas is not the ONLY answer.Plenty of people here spend a lot of time trying to get rid of gas they do not have. If gas vs non-gas producing foods makes a difference for you, it may be gas. There are plenty of examples of people here give up all gas-producing foods and still find they are bloated all the time anyway.If gas-reduction techniques work for you, great, but do not assume that that has to be the ONE AND ONLY thing that is 100% totally true for every other person.There are LOTS of reasons for bloating, gas is but one of them. You cannot assume that if you are bloated it HAS TO BE gas.K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
quote:There are plenty of examples of people here give up all gas-producing foods and still find they are bloated all the time anyway.
I don't think it's possible to eliminate 100% of the fermentation since evolution gives this process to enhance elimination.But yes it's possible to reduce it with diet.However,since bloating happen in normal subject after eating and goes away after peristaltis and time,it's obvious that C-type has chronic bloating because of motility issues.I just want Flux to admit that increase in gas means increase in bloating.
 

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Well it doesn't for me.Even when I was farting up a storm (IBS or not the farting was before during and after) I was never bloated or distended.Now I am on probiotics I don't fart hardly ever, but the belly is still the exact same as it was when I farted more than the normal range.K.
 

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quote:I don't think it's possible to eliminate 100% of the fermentation since evolution gives this process to enhance elimination.
Huh?
quote:I just want Flux to admit that increase in gas means increase in bloating.
I think you have a liter of gas in your intestine (and I don't think IBSers have that much) and be minimally bloated (if the gas is spread out across the whole digestive tract for example), so nope, no admission here.
 

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Well since we are on the subject, what does cause bloating when it's not gas? I myself am bloated every waking moment for the most part. It goes down a little but gets worse periodically throughout the day. Sometimes I swell up so much that the skin around my belly hurts because it's so tight. I have noticed it can happen regardless of whether I have eaten as well. My gut will just start mysteriously expanding for no discrenable reason. So what is adding that physical girth? Are the intenstines "thickening" somehow? Are they dialating?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
quote:be minimally bloated (if the gas is spread out across the whole digestive tract for example
The gas accumulate in 3 areas.Kind a like the Bermuda triangle.
The pubis,the cecum and the sigmoid.So it is not necessarly "spread out" but accumulate here and there.It's just the way the G.I. tract is natually designed.The less movement there is,the more bloat you feel.As i said,normal subject feel bloated after a big meal so it appears that C-ers aren't able to propulse the gaz.So they are constantly in a "after meal state".
quote:I don't think it's possible to eliminate 100% of the fermentation since evolution gives this process to enhance elimination. Huh?
Even when the humans were monkeys,there was a fermentation process.So i hope you realize that something who took millions of years to build should'nt be destroy easily.
 

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I think some of bloating when the abdomen gets bigger around (as opposed to people who feel bloated, but the measurments stay the same, which seems to me to be about mis-sensing signals) I think some of it is when the intestines are uncomfortable or painful they don't like the stomach wall pressing in on them and we by reflex pouch out the stomach area to feel better.If your big stomach goes away after a fart fest it could be gas. If it comes and goes and your farting stays the same, it probably isn't gas that just, for lack of a better analogy, teleports in and out of your intestines at random.Pancreatic enzymes can reduce bloating, and that as far as I can tell has nothing to do with gas production. It has to do with signalling within the GI tract.
 

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Spas, when I take good probiotics I seem to produce very little gas by fermentation. I mean I have days when I only fart maybe one or two times.Digesting carbs by fermentation is only ONE way bacteria eat carbs. The bacteria that do not produce gas from carbs do not ferment them. If you get enough non-fermenting bacteria in there they eat up all the carbs and there is very little left for the gas producing, fermenting bacteria to eat.K.
 

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Okay... I just found out I have IBS, but I've been experiencing symptoms for about 6 years now. I get gas all the time, but excuse me for sounding gross, it's hard for me to pass it. I'll get all bloated and everything else and eventually I'll pass it, but it takes forever. Is that something that is associated with what I'm eating? Is there something that can help that?
 

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Flatus reducing diet: http://www.gicare.com/pated/edtgs12.htmProbiotics may help reduce the amount of gas you produce from these foods.Walking, Yoga and T'ai Chi are all things that may help you pass gas faster than you otherwise would (farting in T'ai Chi and Yoga classes is common, the thought is the torso twisting is what gets the gas to the end quicker than usual).K.
 

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Thank you so much for the welcome! I'm so happy to have found this site! Thanks also, Ms. Kathleen for the advice. I'm definitely going to start putting it into practice. I also have to look up T'ai Chi, 'cuz I have no idea what that is!!!
 

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T'ai Chi is an internal chinese martial art. It is done in slow motion. You may have seen video of people (usually chinese) doing it in the park early in the morning.I study T'ai Chi, so I know about the farting in class thing
 

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Ohhhh, okay... I have heard of it. Sounds interesting. I also just read the link you sent me. Great information! I'm definitely going to try eliminating certain categories to see which are the worst. That's a great idea.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Kathleen M, Ph.D.:farting in T'ai Chi and Yoga classes is common, the thought is the torso twisting is what gets the gas to the end quicker than usual.
I wish I'd known this a year ago, when I was the only guy in a 20 strong yoga class. I thought it was just me, and clenched like mad. I never was aware of any of the ladies cutting loose, although the thought now occurs to me that they may well have felt less inhibited on the weeks when I wasn't there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
quote:Spas, when I take good probiotics I seem to produce very little gas by fermentation. I mean I have days when I only fart maybe one or two times.
You are on what rigth now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
http://www.acg.gi.org/patients/gihealth/pdf/belching.pdfPage 1 BELCHING, BLOATING AND FLATULENCEBy Larry Szarka, M.D., Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota and Michael Levitt, M.D., Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota 1. What are the Gas Related Symptoms? Belching, or burping, refers to the noisy release of air or gas from the stomach through the mouth. Unpleasant abdominal fullness or distention is called bloating. Flatulence is the passage of excessive amounts of intestinal gas, or flatus, through the anus. 2. How Common are Gas Symptoms? As much as 7% of the general population complain of excessive or bothersome belching, and 11% report frequent bloating. Normal people pass gas (flatus), on average, ten times each day. Passage of gas up to twenty times daily is still considered normal. 3. What are the Causes of Gas Symptoms? There are several important factors that influence gas related symptoms. These includethe amount of air that is swallowed; the efficiency with which the gastrointestinal tract moves and expels the air or gas; and the amount of gas that is produced by the bacteria living in the colon that act on incompletely digested food. There are also individual differences in sensitivity or tolerance to normal amounts of retained gas or the passage of a normal amount of flatus. 4. Can a Person Swallow Too Much Air? It is clear that some individuals swallow too much air into the stomach. Eating quickly, gulping food or beverages, and other habits such as drinking through a straw, chewing gum, sucking on hard candy or wearing loose fitting dentures may contribute to excessive air swallowing. People also swallow more frequently, and swallow more air, when they are nervous. Air can also be swallowed and released voluntarily as many people are able to belch at will. In some people, excessive belching has become a learned behavior, or habit, that initially may have been associated with some relief of indigestion symptoms, but now continues almost unconsciously. The air that is swallowed and not removed by belching will pass through the digestive tract and eventually pass as flatus from the rectum. In normal people, about 50% of the gas passed from the rectum comes from swallowed air, and this amount can increase significantly in those individuals who swallow air excessively. Surprisingly, most people who experience excessive bloating and flatulence do not swallow or produce excessive gas. In these individuals, it seems that the movement of swallowed air, from the stomach © The American College of Gastroenterology6400 Goldsboro Rd., Suite 450, Bethesda, MD 20817 P: 301-263-9000 F: 301-263-9025 Internet: www.acg.gi.org --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Page 2 toward the rectum, is much slower than normal. Additionally, the gas may sometimes move the wrong way, returning to the stomach. So, in spite of the fact that the amount of gas may be normal, people can experience bloating and "gas" because the gas is not moved efficiently, and it may accumulate, causing discomfort from the increased stretching of the bowel walls. 5. How Do Some Foods Lead to Excess Gas? Some people have difficulty digesting certain foods completely. This can lead to partially digested food passing from the small intestines to the colon. There are a large number of bacteria in the colon that will readily "digest" the food further and produce gases in the process. Foods that contain certain sugars that are very difficult for most people to digest include the well-known gas-forming foods such as baked beans, lima beans and lentils. Most people also have difficulty properly digesting commonly added sweeteners such as fructose and sorbitol. Some people (particularly adults of Asian, African and Southern European descent) have difficulty digesting lactose (milk sugar) because they do not make enough of the enzyme, lactase, which is needed to breakdown lactose. If there is a large amount of lactose in their diet, then the incompletely digested lactose will pass to the colon where bacteria break it down and produce gas. It is also thought that there are differences between individuals in their sensitivity to intestinal stretching from gas, and their tolerance for gas related symptoms. The sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract and the severity of symptoms tend to increase as the amount of stress increases. 6. Can Certain Medications Cause Excess Gas?There are some prescription medications that purposefully inhibit digestive enzymes (e.g. acarbose) and others that contain indigestible sugars (lactulose and sorbitol) to accomplish their intended effect. These medications will often cause gas-related symptoms.7. Can Excess Gas Mean There is a Serious Problem? Rarely, patients can have a serious underlying disease of the digestive tract, such as celiac disease (gluten intolerance), dumping syndrome or pancreatic insufficiency that is the cause of their gas symptoms. These conditions may lead to improper digestion of food and result in excessive diarrhea, flatulence and finally, malnutrition and weight loss. 8. When Should You See a Doctor about Belching, Bloating or Flatulence? By themselves, gas-symptoms are not worrisome or indicative of any underlying serious condition. A visit to the doctor may be helpful if the symptoms are very bothersome and there are other associated symptoms that may benefit from further testing and or treatment. Symptoms that should be further evaluated by a doctor include abdominal © The American College of Gastroenterology6400 Goldsboro Rd., Suite 450, Bethesda, MD 20817 P: 301-263-9000 F: 301-263-9025 Internet: www.acg.gi.org --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Page 3 pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, weight loss, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract and sometimes heartburn. Currently, there are few clinical tests (other than the history obtained from the patient and a physical examination) that are used to further assess gas symptoms. In some cases, endoscopy (the insertion of a small lighted flexible tube through the mouth into the esophagus and stomach) may be helpful if ulcer disease or reflux disease is suspected, or sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy (insertion of a similar tube into the rectum and colon) if there are associated changes in the bowel patterns. An x-ray of the abdomen may be performed if blockage of the intestines needs to be excluded. Sometimes lactose intolerance should be assessed with a trial of a lactose free diet for two weeks, or with a special blood or breath test. There are also simple blood tests available to screen for celiac disease (gluten sensitivity) if there are other features to suggest this disorder. 9. What Treatments are Available for the Gas-Related Symptoms? Sometimes excessive belching is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and treatment of this condition may alleviate bothersome burping. Anti-gas medications, such as simethicone, are generally useless for excessive belching. Lifestyle modification such as avoidance of rapid eating, chewing gum, carbonated beverages and stopping smoking are often recommended but the response is variable. When simple reassurance and lifestyle modifications are not satisfactory, then psychological treatments such as relaxation therapy or behavioral therapy are currently the most useful approaches. Bloating and flatulence are sometimes related to constipation, and treating the underlying condition may be helpful. After other conditions, such as lactose intolerance, have been excluded, a low gas-forming diet should be recommended. The diet excludes poorly digested foods such as the Brassica vegetables (brussels sprouts, turnip, rape, mustard and cabbage, as well as beans and lentils. Foods (including any drink, candy, gum or breath freshener) that contain sorbitol and added fructose should also be avoided. Fiber supplements and a high fiber diet can aggravate bloating symptoms, and should be discontinued if there is no benefit. A diet containing rice flour is fully absorbed in the small intestines and so produces the least amount of gas. There are several over-the-counter medications to treat gas-related symptoms including simethicone, activated charcoal and beano. Unfortunately, none of these products are very effective.© The American College of Gastroenterology6400 Goldsboro Rd., Suite 450, Bethesda, MD 20817 P: 301-263-9000 F: 301-263-9025 Internet: www.acg.gi.org
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
In my book,
quote:the increased stretching of the bowel walls.
is bloating.
 

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But not in your body.
 
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